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FURTHER APPLICATIONS OF INTEGRATION

FURTHER APPLICATIONS OF INTEGRATION

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FURTHER APPLICATIONS OF INTEGRATION

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  1. 9 FURTHER APPLICATIONS OF INTEGRATION

  2. FURTHER APPLICATIONS OF INTEGRATION 8.3Applications to Physics and Engineering • In this section, we will learn about: • The applications of integral calculus to • force due to water pressure and centers of mass.

  3. APPLICATIONS TO PHYSICS AND ENGINEERING • As with our previous applications to geometry (areas, volumes, and lengths) and to work, our strategy is: • Break up the physical quantity into small parts. • Approximate each small part. • Add the results. • Take the limit. • Then, evaluate the resulting integral.

  4. HYDROSTATIC FORCE AND PRESSURE • Deep-sea divers realize that water pressure increases as they dive deeper. • This is because the weight of the water above them increases.

  5. HYDROSTATIC FORCE AND PRESSURE • Suppose that a thin plate with area A m2 is submerged in a fluid of density ρkg/m3 at a depth d meters below the surface of the fluid.

  6. HYDROSTATIC FORCE AND PRESSURE • The fluid directly above the plate has volume • V = Ad • So, its mass is: • m =ρV =ρAd

  7. HYDROSTATIC FORCE • Thus, the force exerted by the fluid on the plate isF = mg =ρgAd • where g is the acceleration due to gravity.

  8. HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE • The pressure Pon the plate is defined to be the force per unit area:

  9. HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE • The SI unit for measuring pressure is newtons per square meter—which is called a pascal (abbreviation: 1 N/m2 = 1 Pa). • As this is a small unit, the kilopascal (kPa) is often used.

  10. HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE • For instance, since the density of water is ρ = 1000 kg/m3, the pressure at the bottom of a swimming pool 2 m deep is:

  11. HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE • An important principle of fluid pressure is the experimentally verified fact that, at any point in a liquid, the pressure is the same in all directions. • This is why a diver feels the same pressure on nose and both ears.

  12. HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE Equation 1 • Thus, the pressure in anydirection at a depth d in a fluid with mass density ρis given by:

  13. HYDROSTATIC FORCE AND PRESSURE • This helps us determine the hydrostatic force against a verticalplate or wall or dam in a fluid. • This is not a straightforward problem. • The pressure is not constant, but increases as the depth increases.

  14. HYDROSTATIC F AND P Example 1 • A dam has the shape of the trapezoid shown below. • The height is 20 m. • The width is 50 m at the top and 30 m at the bottom.

  15. HYDROSTATIC F AND P Example 1 • Find the force on the dam due to hydrostatic pressure if the water level is 4 m from the top of the dam.

  16. HYDROSTATIC F AND P Example 1 • We choose a vertical x-axis with origin at the surface of the water.

  17. HYDROSTATIC F AND P Example 1 • The depth of the water is 16 m. • So, we divide the interval [0, 16] into subintervals of equal length with endpoints xi. • We choose xi* [xi–1, xi].

  18. HYDROSTATIC F AND P Example 1 • The i th horizontal strip of the dam is approximated by a rectangle with height Δx and width wi

  19. HYDROSTATIC F AND P Example 1 • From similar triangles,

  20. HYDROSTATIC F AND P Example 1 • Hence,

  21. HYDROSTATIC F AND P Example 1 • If Ai is the area of the strip, then • If Δx is small, then the pressure Pi on the i th strip is almost constant, and we can use Equation 1 to write:

  22. HYDROSTATIC F AND P Example 1 • The hydrostatic force Fi acting on the i th strip is the product of the pressure and the area:

  23. HYDROSTATIC F AND P Example 1 • Adding these forces and taking the limit as n → ∞, the total hydrostatic force on the dam is:

  24. HYDROSTATIC F AND P Example 2 • Find the hydrostatic force on one end of a cylindrical drum with radius 3 ft, if the drum is submerged in water 10 ft deep.

  25. HYDROSTATIC F AND P Example 2 • In this example, it is convenient to choose the axes as shown—so that the origin is placed at the center of the drum. • Then, the circle has a simple equation: x2 + y2 = 9

  26. HYDROSTATIC F AND P Example 2 • As in Example 1, we divide the circular region into horizontal strips of equal width.

  27. HYDROSTATIC F AND P Example 2 • From the equation of the circle, we see that the length of the i th strip is: • So, its area is:

  28. HYDROSTATIC F AND P Example 2 • The pressure on this strip is approximately • So, the force on the strip is approximately

  29. HYDROSTATIC F AND P Example 2 • We get the total force by adding the forces on all the strips and taking the limit:

  30. HYDROSTATIC F AND P Example 2 • The second integral is 0 because the integrand is an odd function. • See Theorem 7 in Section 5.5

  31. HYDROSTATIC F AND P Example 2 • The first integral can be evaluated using the trigonometric substitution y = 3 sinθ. • However, it’s simpler to observe that it is the area of a semicircular disk with radius 3.

  32. HYDROSTATIC F AND P Example 2 • Thus,

  33. MOMENTS AND CENTERS OF MASS • Our main objective here is to find the point P on which a thin plate of any given shape balances horizontally as shown.

  34. CENTERS OF MASS • This point is called the center of mass(or center of gravity) of the plate.

  35. CENTERS OF MASS • We first consider the simpler situation illustrated here.

  36. CENTERS OF MASS • Two masses m1 and m2 are attached to a rod of negligible mass on opposite sides of a fulcrum and at distances d1 and d2 from the fulcrum.

  37. CENTERS OF MASS Equation 2 • The rod will balance if:

  38. LAW OF THE LEVER • This is an experimental fact discovered by Archimedes and called the Law of the Lever. • Think of a lighter person balancing a heavier one on a seesaw by sitting farther away from the center.

  39. MOMENTS AND CENTERS OF MASS • Now, suppose that the rod lies along the x-axis, with m1 at x1 and m2 at x2and the center of mass at .

  40. MOMENTS AND CENTERS OF MASS • Comparing the figures, we see that: • d1 = – x1 • d2 = x1 –

  41. CENTERS OF MASS Equation 3 • So, Equation 2 gives:

  42. MOMENTS OF MASS • The numbers m1x1 and m2x2 are called the momentsof the masses m1 and m2 (with respect to the origin).

  43. MOMENTS OF MASS • Equation 3 says that the center of mass is obtained by: • Adding the moments of the masses • Dividing by the total mass m =m1 + m2

  44. CENTERS OF MASS Equation 4 • In general, suppose we have a system of n particles with masses m1, m2, . . . , mn located at the points x1, x2, . . . , xn on the x-axis. • Then, we can show where the center of mass of the system is located—as follows.

  45. CENTERS OF MASS Equation 4 • The center of mass of the system is located at • where m = Σmi is the total mass of the system.

  46. MOMENT OF SYSTEM ABOUT ORIGIN • The sum of the individual moments • is called the moment of the system about the origin.

  47. MOMENT OF SYSTEM ABOUT ORIGIN • Then, Equation 4 could be rewritten as: • m = M • This means that, if the total mass were considered as being concentrated at the center of mass , then its moment would be the same as the moment of the system.

  48. MOMENTS AND CENTERS OF MASS • Now, we consider a system of n particles with masses m1, m2, . . . , mn located at the points (x1, y1),(x2, y2) . . . , (xn, yn) in the xy-plane.

  49. MOMENT ABOUT AXES Equations 5 and 6 • By analogy with the one-dimensional case, we define the moment of the system about the y-axisas • and the moment of the system about the x-axisas

  50. MOMENT ABOUT AXES • My measures the tendency of the system to rotate about the y-axis. • Mx measures the tendency of the system to rotate about the x-axis.