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Oakland, California PowerPoint Presentation
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Oakland, California

Oakland, California

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Oakland, California

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  1. Oakland, California

  2. The Unity Council Vision Economically, socially & physically revitalize the Fruitvale neighborhood

  3. The Unity CouncilWho we are • The Unity Council was founded in 1964, incorporated in 1967, and received 501 (c) (3) tax exempt status in 1968 • The Unity Council is a non-profit community development corporation committed to enriching the quality of life of families primarily in the Fruitvale District (Place-Based Philosophy) • The Unity Council has an annual budget of approximately $10M and 150 full-time staff

  4. Unity Council ProgramsWhat do we do • Commercial District Revitalization • Workforce Development • Peralta Service Corporation • Americorps • Head Start and Early Head Start • Family Literacy • Youth Services • Senior Services • Homeownership • Public Market • Fruitvale Village Development

  5. The Fruitvale NeighborhoodLate 1980’s, early 1990’s Assessment • Problems: • Flight to the suburbs • Decline in economic, physical, and social conditions • High commercial vacancies • Low homeownership • High absentee property owners

  6. The Fruitvale Neighborhood • Assets: • Centrally located • Excellent transit system • Ethnically and racially diverse • Strong community based organizations • Committed & Powerful political leadership

  7. Fruitvale BART Parking Lot

  8. Components of aComprehensive Development • Physical Revitalization • Economic Revitalization • Social Revitalization

  9. Components of aComprehensive Development • Physical revitalization • New construction • Fruitvale Transit Village • Pedestrian plaza and paseo • Las Bougainvilleas • Façade and Street improvement • Code compliance • Graffiti abatement • Grime reduction

  10. Las Bougainvilleas Affordable Senior Housing

  11. LasBougainvilleas

  12. Components of aComprehensive Development • Economic revitalization • ‘Main Street’ • Referral to capital sources • Business assistance and seminars • Organizing of merchants and residents • Promotion of neighborhood • Cultural & neighborhood celebrations • Qué Pasa Newsletter

  13. Components of aComprehensive Development • Social revitalization • Community & Family Asset Development • Resident and block organizing • Leadership Development • Crime busting • Pedestrian safety • Neighborhood cleanups • Leadership development • Increased Open Space and Recreational Services

  14. Strategic Approach$70M Mixed-Use Development • Comprehensive • Geographically based • Large-scale • Built on 19-acres surrounding the Fruitvale BART station • Collaboration and partnership • Targeting of Resources

  15. Fruitvale Transit Village Implementation • Land assembly • Environmental hazards • Zoning • Access to capital & financing • Political will & bureaucracy • Time

  16. Fruitvale Transit Village • The Central Core includes: • 2 mixed-use complexes – 255,000 sq. ft 47 Residential Units 40,000 sq ft Retail 114,000 sq ft Commercial • Major Street Improvements - International Boulevard & 34th Avenue • Parking: BART & Tenants • Intermodel bus transfer facility

  17. Fruitvale Village Leasing Program • Residential Fully Leased • Commercial – 20,000 sq ft available • Retail – 5,200 sq ft available

  18. Project Impact Area

  19. What It Takes • Commitment to and connections to community • Shared vision • Support from the community • Support from elected and appointed officials • Institutional capacity: • Leadership • Strong Board of Directors • Strong executive & fiscal management • Sophisticated development and financing knowledge • Fundraising

  20. Fruitvale Village Construction

  21. Extent to which TOD Goals are Achieved • Projects that strive to achieve physical and economic revitalization goals as part of TOD agenda • Uses and configurations that allow a greater ability to live, work, and shop within the same neighborhood • Development that strives to attain greater local economic development and enhanced fiscal revenues • The provision of retail uses and services within walking distance necessary to satisfy the basic daily needs of residents and local employees • Public-private developments that strive to make projects financially attractive to the private sector

  22. Extent to which TOD Goals are Achieved (cont’d) • Increased transit usage and mobility choices • Better transit connections to both local and regional destinations • Decreased auto use and ownership • Reasonable level of parking that does not encourage more auto use or displace better uses of limited TOD land

  23. Conclusion • Comprehensive strategies work • Change is possible • There is greater awareness with respect to sustainable development, but few resources

  24. Oakland, California