Download
connecting pbis student support teams and school mental health n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Connecting PBIS, Student Support Teams, and School Mental Health PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Connecting PBIS, Student Support Teams, and School Mental Health

Connecting PBIS, Student Support Teams, and School Mental Health

182 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

Connecting PBIS, Student Support Teams, and School Mental Health

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Connecting PBIS, Student Support Teams, and School Mental Health Margaret Grady Kidder William Flook Joan Ledvina Parr Erika Wood Baltimore County Public Schools National Association of School Psychologists Chicago, Illinois March 2, 2010

  2. Baltimore County Public Schools • Dr. Joe A. Hairston, Superintendent • 26th largest school system in the nation • Approximately 103,832 students • 37.1% FARMS • 52.2% Minority enrollment • 03.2% English language learners • 12.3% Students with disabilities 6-21 • 172 schools, centers, and programs • 104 Elementary • 27 Middle • 24 High • 4 Special education schools, 11 centers, 2 programs • Over 17,000 employees including 8,850 classroom teachers October 2009

  3. Department of Student Support Services Dale R. Rauenzahn, Executive Director Patsy J. Holmes, Director • Alternative Programs • Athletics • Health Services • Psychological Services • Pupil Personnel/School Social Work Services • Safe & Drug-free Schools • School Counseling

  4. Department of Student Support Services • Mission Coordinates prevention and intervention programs and services: • to support schools, students, and parents/guardians, • by addressing the cognitive, behavioral, social, emotional, health, safety, and alternative educational needs of all students • to maximize students’ potential achievement

  5. Objectives • Review the Response to Intervention (RtI) framework in progress • Review ideas and issues related to culturally responsive schools • Review the Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) program

  6. Objectives • Review PBIS implementation, discipline, and achievement data • Review Student Support Teams (SST) • Review web-based SST forms, Student Support Plans, and 504 Plans • Review school mental health services through community partnerships and outcome data

  7. Response to Intervention (RtI) • General education initiative that provides high quality teaching and learning experiences for all students, all grades, all classrooms • Systematic, schoolwide, multi-tiered approach that provides prevention and early intervention activities to support student achievement and positive behavior • Implements academic and behavioral instructional interventions and supports at increasing levels of intensity to address specific student needs Maryland State Department of Education, June, 2008

  8. Response to Intervention (RtI) • Specially designed instruction and services • More intensive, individualized behavior planning Intensive Intervention Response to Intervention • Alternative instructional programs • Individualized student interventions as specified in student support plans Early Intervention • Supplemental instruction • Targeted interventions for groups of students or settings Prevention • Differentiated instruction based on frequent progress monitoring • Effective classroom organization and behavior planning • Consistent implementation of the core curriculum • Schoolwide behavior planning

  9. Maryland’s Response to Intervention (RtI) Framework Behavioral Systems Academic Systems • Intensive, Individually Designed Interventions • Strategies to address needs of individual students with intensive needs • Function-based assessments • Intense, durable strategies • Intensive, Individually Designed Interventions • Address individual needs of student • Assessment-based • High Intensity • Targeted, Group Interventions • Small, needs-based groups for • at risk students who do not respond • to universal strategies • High efficiency • Rapid response • Targeted, Group Interventions • Small, needs-based groups for at-risk students who do not respond to universal strategies • High efficiency/ Rapid response • Function-based logic • Core Curriculum and • Differentiated Instruction • All students • Preventive, proactive • Schoolwide or classroom • systems for ALL students • Core Curriculum and • Universal Interventions • All settings, all students • Preventive, proactive • Schoolwide or classroom systems for ALL students and staff 1-5% 1-5% 5-10% 5-10% 80-90% 80-90%

  10. Response to Intervention (RtI) • Essential Components • Universal screening • Problem-solving/decision-making practices • Tiered levels of implementation of high quality instruction/intervention • Progress monitoring • Fidelity of implementation • Family involvement • Considerations for English Language Learners Maryland State Department of Education, June, 2008

  11. Systematic Academic & Behavior Planning Intervention/Team Tiers Tier 3 Intensive Interventions: SST/IEP Teams Small groups or individual students; alternative programs and special education instruction and/or services FEW ~5% SOME ~15% Tier 2 Targeted Interventions: Student Support Teams Groups of students or individual students at risk; screen and monitor; case management, student support plans, 504 plans Tier 1 Universal Interventions : PBIS Teams Grade Level Teacher Meetings All settings, all students; monitor and differentiate instruction; implement supplemental interventions ALL ~80% of Students

  12. The problem solving process is not about proving what’s wrong with the student. It’s about finding out how to teach the student so he or she can learn. It’s discovering who that child is …as a LEARNER. http://www.ciclt.net/ul/gael/SettingtheSSTAGEforGreatPerfomances.ppt#430,40,Slide 40 Changes in Our Approach to Problem Solving

  13. The Need for Developing Culturally Responsive Systems The “Whole” Student Peer Influences Curriculum Learner Home/ Community Classroom Environment http://www.signetwork.org

  14. Culturally Responsive Schools • The three-tiered, response to intervention (RtI) model is a systems approach to educate all students while being responsive to current social, cultural, and educational challenges • A culturally responsive disciplined school is one that acknowledges the presence of culturally linguistically diverse (CLD) students and demonstrates evidence of caring, fairness, behavioral management, affirmations, social skills instruction, and commitment Cartledge et al., 2009

  15. Culturally Responsive Schools • A culturally responsive school enables a staff to demonstrate cultural competence • Being culturally competent means possessing the ability to function effectively within cultural contexts that is different from your own • Various cultural, language, heritage, and experiences are valued and used to facilitate learning and development • To have practice that is culturally competent, requires knowledge, skills, experience, and the ability to engage in practices that result in improved outcomes and services for all students Ritter & Skiba, 2006

  16. Culturally Responsive Schools • Questions to think about • Do the students in my school come from diverse cultural backgrounds? • What are my perceptions of students from different racial, ethnic, social-economic groups? What are my colleagues’ perceptions? • How do I respond to my students based on these perceptions? Do I respond differently because of these perceptions? • How well does my school incorporate the culturally linguistically diverse student’s family and community? http://www.nccrest.org/disproportionality/PositiveBehaviorSystems.ppt

  17. Culturally Responsive Schools • An example: An elementary school in year 3 of PBIS implementation experiencing issues of school climate despite buy in and great response to PBIS • Discipline referrals decreased • Students more engaged in learning—spending more time in the classroom vs. office • Student perception survey (3rd , 4th and 5th graders) • Despite students feeling that teachers care about them and like them, why don’t our students feel valued and wanted within their classrooms?

  18. FEW SOME ALL Tier 1: Universal InterventionsPositive Behavioral Interventions and Supports PBIS

  19. Maryland PBIS Partnership & Collaboration

  20. PBIS in Baltimore County • BCPS Blueprint for Progress Performance Goal 4: All students will be educated in school environments that are safe and conducive to learning • All 172 schools, centers, and programs are expected to have a Code of Conduct and address behavioral issues through the school improvement planning process

  21. PBIS in Baltimore County • Coordinated by Department of Student Support Services • Selected schools are invited to participate in PBIS training • Schools selected by suspension rates/behavior issues • Schools self-select based on their school improvement planning • 72 schools and centers implement PBIS • 45 elementary, 16 middle, 8 high, 2 special, 1 center/program • 60 PBIS coaches: school psychologists, pupil personnel workers, school social workers

  22. Basic Concepts of PBIS New School Teams are trained at the PBIS Summer Institute sponsored by Maryland State Department of Education, Sheppard Pratt Health System, and the Johns Hopkins University The following training materials are adapted from the PBIS model as developed by Dr. George Sugai, University of Connecticut, and Dr. Rob Horner, University of Oregon See US Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) Technical Assistance Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports at www.pbis.org See www.pbismaryland.org

  23. Key Elements of PBIS Schoolwide behavior planning is based on a balance of four key elements: • Clearly specified OUTCOMES that are related to behavior and student achievement • SYSTEMS that support staff buy-in and sustained use of effective practices • DATAgathered by the school to make decisions about improving behavior and learning • Evidence-based PRACTICES and interventions that are effective for staff and students

  24. Process for Supporting Social Competence and Academic Achievement OUTCOMES Supporting Staff Behavior Supporting Decision Making DATA School-wide Classroom Non-classroom Individual SYSTEMS Office Discipline Referrals Staff Input Academic Progress Attendance PRACTICES Define behavior expectations Specify routines Teach Acknowledge Correct Follow up and feedback Reinforcement Generalization Supporting Student Behavior

  25. PBIS Schoolwide Interventions • Establish commitment and maintain team • Establish schoolwide expectations • Establish an on-going system of rewards • Establish a system for responding to behavioral violations • Establish a data system to monitor progress and aid in decision making • Arrange for consistent implementation and utilize district level support

  26. 1. Establish commitment and maintain team • Establish PBIS Leadership Team • Strong, administrative support • Schoolwide representation on PBIS Team • Secure schoolwide agreements and supports • Strive for “full” (>80%) faculty participation • Prioritize resources (time, materials, cost) • Plan on a 3 – 5 year commitment • Establish a data-based action plan (see packet) • Review and connect with the School Improvement Plan • Use the PBIS Staff Survey results • Use behavior data, office referrals, suspensions

  27. 2. Establish schoolwide expectations • Develop rules of behavior • 3 to 5 positively stated rules • Easy to remember • Apply to all students, settings, and staff • Develop a matrix of expected behavior in target contexts • Contexts include: classrooms, hallways, gym, cafeteria, common areas, bus loading zone, etc. • Teach the expected behaviors using an instructional approach • Directly teach (tell/explain, model/show, practice, give reminders and pre-corrections) • Actively supervise • Positively reinforce

  28. High 5’s Be respectful Be responsible Be there, be ready Follow directions Hands/feet to self The Respect School Respect others Respect property Respect yourself Formula 4 Success Respect Responsibility Ready-to-learn Re-thinking The 5 Be’s Be kind Be safe Be cooperative Be respectful Be peaceful Code of Conduct I am respectful I am responsible I am safe I am prepared Respect + Responsibility = Pride Show respect Show responsibility Develop Rules of Behavior

  29. Viking Code of Conduct Be respectful Be responsible Be ready Eagle PRIDE P reparation R esponsibility I ntegrity D iligence E arn Respect RAMS Rules R esponsibility and Respect A cademic Achievement M otivation S uccess Tenets of Kenwood Pride B e there and prepared L ive responsibly U phold integrity E arn and give respect Develop Rules of Behavior

  30. Matrix of Expected Behavior

  31. 3. Establish an on-going system of rewards • Acknowledge expected behavior • Use tangible rewards and acknowledgements • High Five’s, coupons, “gotchas” • Use social recognition • Assemblies, bulletin boards, names over the intercom • Use guidelines • Fade tangibles • Schedule strategically • Maintain 5:1 positive to correction ratio

  32. Correction Reinforcement(success) Discipline Works When …. Prevention creates more positive than negative consequences 5 : 1

  33. 4. Establish a system for responding to behavioral violations • Develop an agreement about which behaviors are handled in the classroom and which are managed in the office • Use verbal redirection, teacher consequence, and/or office referral • Use pre-correction and restatement of expected behaviors

  34. Decision Flowchart

  35. 5. Establish a data system to monitor progress and aid in decision making • Utilize a data management system, e.g., STARS discipline module • Develop procedures for ongoing monitoring and evaluation • Meet regularly to review data and implement interventions

  36. 6. Arrange for consistent implementation and utilize district level support • Develop/implement targeted interventions for groups of students or particular problem areas, e.g., hallways • Connect PBIS Team with School Improvement Team and Student Support Team (SST) • Utilize Student Support Team (SST) to develop and implement targeted group interventions, academic and behavioral interventions through Student Support Plans, and function-based support through FBA/BIPs • Utilize district level support and other resources

  37. How BCPS Supports PBIS Schools • Levels of PBIS support include: • School-based team • Strong, administrative leadership is encouraged • Schoolwide representation on PBIS team • PBIS coach assigned to school team • Provides expertise on the PBIS process, behavior analysis, and data interpretation • MSDE/BCPS PBIS leadership • Provides consultation, training, and support

  38. PBIS Training by MSDE & BCPS • MSDE leadership forum for administrators • MSDE summer institute for new PBIS schools • MSDE leadership and coaches meetings during school year • BCPS summer training for returning PBIS schools • BCPS PBIS team leaders/coaches meetings during school year • BCPS consultation by PBIS facilitator, coordinator, and coaches throughout year

  39. Baltimore County Schools Trained in PBIS (1) (1) (4) (11) (9) (6) (16) (15) (9) (3) (4) Data Aug 2008 – June 2009

  40. Mean SET Scores for PBIS Schools by Level of RecognitionMSDE Awards as of July 2009 Data Aug 2008 – June 2009

  41. Percentage of PBIS Schools per Implementation Phase Data Aug 2008 – June 2009

  42. Implementation Phases InventoryPercentage of Critical Features in Placeby Elementary, Middle, & High Data Aug 2008 – June 2009

  43. Mean Number of Suspensions and Expulsions by Elementary, Middle, & High SY0607 vs. SY0708 vs. SY0809 Data Aug 2008 – June 2009

  44. PBIS Elementary SchoolsMean Number of Suspensions and Expulsionsby Level of RecognitionSchool Year 2008 -2009 Data Aug 2008 – June 2009

  45. PBIS Middle SchoolsMean Number of Suspensions and Expulsionsby Level of RecognitionSchool Year 2008 - 2009 Data Aug 2008 – June 2009

  46. PBIS High SchoolsMean Number of Suspensions and Expulsions by Level of RecognitionSchool Year 2008 - 2009 Data Aug 2008 – June 2009