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Confidentiality

Confidentiality

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Confidentiality

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  1. Confidentiality HIPAA

  2. Confidentiality • To put it simply, everything regarding patients is confidential, especially if it is in the patient’s chart. • The rule of confidentiality is extended to everyone who has access to the chart. • The patient’s record is a legal document and is not the place for stories, complaints or jokes

  3. Confidentiality • Willfully entering incorrect information into a patient’s record legally constitutes fraud and is a complete breach of professional ethics. • Information therein should never be discussed in public • Failure to follow these rules can lead to legal action for breach of confidence

  4. AS YOU LEAVE WORK OR YOUR CLINIC……. Follow this rule! • What you see here • What you say here • What you learn here • LET IT STAY HERE • WHEN YOU LEAVE HERE

  5. HIPAA Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act

  6. What is HIPAA? • A federal law designed to protect health information • Went into effect April 14, 2003 • Everyone who has access to a patients health information is required to follow rules related to sharing of that information. • Non-compliance with the law can result in fines or criminal penalties.

  7. 1 in 5 American adults believes their personal medical information has been disclosed improperly Half of these people believe that it resulted in personal embarrassment or harm California HealthCare Foundation Survey conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates, January, 1999 Privacy Rule:Cause for Concern

  8. Privacy Rule:Cause for Concern • 1 in 7 Americans has tried to keep their medical information confidential • Withhold information • Provide inaccurate information • Doctor-hop • Pay out-of-pocket for care • Avoid care altogether • California HealthCare Foundation • Survey conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates • January 1999

  9. A hospital in Montana posted the psychiatric records of dozens of children on its public web site, where they remained until discovered by a newspaper reporter. In Jacksonville, FL, a woman brought her teenage daughter to work and left her unattended at a logged in computer. The girl looked up patient phone numbers, and phoned to tell them that they’d tested positive for HIV. One patient attempted suicide. In Miami, Florida, several hundred hospital workers browsed though the records of a famous patient who had recently come to the facility. Cause for Concern

  10. Civil/Criminal Penalties • $25,000 for multiple violations of same standard in a calendar year • $250,000 and/or imprisonment up to ten (10) years for use of PHI for commercial advantage, personal gain, or material harm

  11. Permitted Disclosures • Patient • Personal Representative Examples: • Legal guardian • Power of attorney • Family, Relative, Next of Kin

  12. Permitted Uses and Disclosures of PHI Permitted: • Treatment • Payment • Health Care Operations

  13. Treatment • Provision of health care by provider • Coordination of health care among providers • Referral of patient from one provider to another • Coordination of health care or other services with 3rd parties if authorized by patient

  14. Payment • Determining coverage of health benefit claims • Billing, claims management and medical data processing • Review of health care services with respect to medical necessity, coverage, appropriateness • Utilization review activities

  15. Health Care Operations • Quality assessment and improvement • Legal services • Evaluating performance of health care professionals • Training future health care professionals • General administrative functions

  16. Patient Authorization • Must get authorization for all other uses such as: • Marketing • Clinical research • Mental health • Substance Abuse • HIV • Any others

  17. Patient Rights • Confidentiality of PHI • Privacy Notice • Request Restrictions • Confidential Communications • Access to Medical Record • Accounting of Disclosures • Amend/Correct Medical Record • File a Complaint

  18. Individually identifiable information Health information Demographics ANY form or medium Oral Written Electronic Name Photograph Social security # Finger prints Health status Admission date Diagnosis Medical record # Address Birth date Telephone # Fax # Email What is Protected Health Information (PHI)?

  19. Suggestions • IF you are unsure if disclosure of health information is permitted, it is best to get authorization from the patient first. • Become familiar with your employers standard operating procedure related to HIPAA • Become familiar with your employers privacy forms.

  20. Confidentiality of PHI Never share PHI unless job related Patient Rights: Confidentiality

  21. Internet Social Networking Sites such as My Space or Facebook etc • Be careful not to mention any patient information on those sites • Do not ask a patient to join your friends list

  22. Confidentiality of PHI Access PHI on need to know basis Dispose of PHI confidentially Patient Rights: Confidentiality

  23. Telephone- Calls to Patients Appointment reminders Voice message Leaving information with family Check to see patient preference Patient Rights: Confidentiality

  24. Telephone- Calls from Family/Friends What can be shared Professional judgment Use Privacy Rule when uncomfortable Patient Rights: Confidentiality

  25. Security Walk through with critical eye Patient schedules Simple changes “Reasonable” Increased awareness Patient Rights: Confidentiality

  26. Faxing Pre-call Cover sheet Call if error occurs Disposal Patient Rights: Confidentiality

  27. Email Non-secure Patient consent Subject line Security regulations Patient Rights: Confidentiality

  28. Patient Rights: Confidentiality Incidental Disclosures • Calling out patient’s name • Sign-in sheet • Reasonable • Limit where possible

  29. Patient Opportunity toObject or Agree • Disclosing PHI to family, friends, others assisting in patient’s care • Patient present/conscious • Verbal agreement • Opportunity to object • Use professional judgment • Patient not present/unconscious • Best interest of patient • Relevant to person’s involvement

  30. Disclosure of PHI • Must verify identity and authority before disclosing • If not known to yourequire: • ID/badge • Verbal affirmations • Legal documentation • Use professional judgment

  31. Patient Rights: Privacy Notice • Patient has the right to receive a notice of privacy practices • Given to every patient at first encounter • One time – document • Acknowledgment form – to be filed

  32. Patient Rights: Privacy Notice Notice describes: • How medical information is used and disclosed by covered entity • Summary of patient rights • Who to contact • How to file a complaint and ask questions

  33. Patient Rights:Request Restrictions • Informal • Ask caregiver to restrict what is told to others • Caregiver uses professional judgment • Inform patient of their decision • Applies to current episode of care • Formal • Refer to Privacy Officer • In writing • 30 days

  34. Patient Rights:Confidential Communications • Receive communication at alternate address • No reason given • Administratively reasonable

  35. Patient Rights:Access to PHI • Access or inspect their medical record • View with staff present • Obtain copies • 30 days

  36. Disclosures • Permitted with no need for authorization from patient • Required by law • Public health activities • Health oversight agencies • Victim of abuse, neglect • Law enforcement purposes • Organ donation • To avert serious threat to health or safety • Specialized government functions • Workers compensation

  37. Patient Rights:Corrections/Amendments • Informal process: Correct medical record • For inaccurate information • Use professional judgment • Formal process: Amend medical record • In writing • Determination based on circumstances

  38. Patient Rights:File a Complaint • Privacy Officer • Secretary of Health and Human Services

  39. Patient Rights: Confidentiality Big Daddy, super sports star, was injured during a game and comes to your practice wanting to get some emergency dental work. All your friends are begging you to find out more information about what happened to Big Daddy. Your position gives you access to patient records and it would be easy to find out everything everyone is curious to know. Big Daddy won't know or care. He might even have be pleased to know that everyone is so concerned about him. Plus, some of the information will come out in the press in a few days anyway. What do you do?

  40. Patient Rights: Confidentiality • Sneak a peek at the chart but refuse to share any information with friends. • Sneak a peek at the chart on your own personal time and share only information that will become public anyway. • Explain to friends that a professional in any health care institution cannot look at patient records without a good reason to know the information for health care or billing purposes. • Explain to friends that the institution has an audit system that will track anyone who looks at the patient’s record and that you will lose your job unless you had a good reason to look at the chart.

  41. Patient Rights: Confidentiality • Sneak a peek at the chart but refuse to share any information with friends. • Sneak a peek at the chart on your own personal time and share only information that will become public anyway. • Explain to friends that a professional in any health care institution cannot look at patient records without a good reason to know the information for health care or billing purposes. • Explain to friends that the institution has an audit system that will track anyone who looks at the patient’s record and that you will lose your job unless you had a good reason to look at the chart.

  42. Patient Rights: Confidentiality You are a health care professional caring for Mr. Linn, a patient. Dr. Herra approaches you and asks to see Mr. Linn’s chart. She is not his physician but is his next door neighbor. “I just want to know what he has so I can help,” she explains. What do you do? • Hand over the chart so she can help manage his care. She’s a doctor and knows what she’s doing. • Smile and ask, “Do you have his permission?” • Hand over the chart and tell your supervisor what happened. • Ask Dr. Herra to complete an acknowledgment releasing the medical record to her.

  43. Patient Rights: Confidentiality You are a health care professional caring for Mr. Linn, a patient. Dr. Herra approaches you and asks to see Mr. Linn’s chart. She is not his physician but is his next door neighbor. “I just want to know what he has so I can help,” she explains. What do you do? • Hand over the chart so she can help manage his care. She’s a doctor and knows what she’s doing. • Smile and ask, “Do you have his permission?” • Hand over the chart and tell your supervisor what happened. • Ask Dr. Herra to complete an acknowledgment releasing the medical record to her.

  44. Patient Rights: Confidentiality You attend a weekly meeting where a list of patient names, medical record numbers and diagnoses are distributed for purposes of discussion. After everyone else leaves the meeting you notice that several copies of the patient list are still on the table. What do you do?

  45. Patient Rights: Confidentiality A.Toss them in the wastebasket to make sure the next group using the room doesn’t see them. • Alert the person who distributed the list to make sure the problem doesn’t happen again. • Pick up all the copies and dispose of them confidentially to make sure the information does not become public. • Pick up all the copies, dispose of them confidentially, and raise the issue of privacy practices at the next meeting.

  46. Patient Rights: Confidentiality A. Toss them in the wastebasket to make sure the next group using the room doesn’t see them. • Alert the person who distributed the list to make sure the problem doesn’t happen again. • Pick up all the copies and dispose of them confidentially to make sure the information does not become public. • Pick up all the copies, dispose of them confidentially, and raise the issue of privacy practices at the next meeting.

  47. Dr. Good is discussing a patient’s care with a nurse just outside the patient’s door. Another patient wandering in the halls hears what is being said. Dr. Good later discusses the case in the elevator with Dr. Timely. Everyone in the elevator hears the conversation. Has Dr. Good violated the privacy regulations?

  48. No, because the privacy regulations only cover written or electronic information. • No, because the regulations allow health care providers to discuss anything they want, anywhere they want. • Yes, conversations about a patient should occur only where there is no possibility of being overheard. • Maybe. It depends on whether Dr. Good could reasonably have found more private times and places to discuss the case.

  49. No, because the privacy regulations only cover written or electronic information. • No, because the regulations allow health care providers to discuss anything they want, anywhere they want. • Yes, conversations about a patient should occur only where there is no possibility of being overheard. • Maybe. It depends on whether Dr. Good could reasonably have found more private times and places to discuss the case.

  50. Helpful Websites • http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/newfaq OCR frequently asked questions • http://privacy.med.miami.edu/index • http://policies.uihc.uiowa.edu • http://www.wedi.org/snip