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World Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA)

World Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA)

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World Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA)

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  1. World Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) ACCESS for ELLs® Lync Training November 4, 2013 Chris Williams
  2. WIDA ACCESS Placement Test(W-APT™) November 12, 2013 Chris Williams
  3. W-APT™ Give each new student in your district the home-language survey. If the answer to any of the 4 required home-language survey questions is any language other than English, then administer the screener, W-APT™. The W-APT™ is downloadable free to districts from the website: Contact Chris Williams for a password. The results of the W-APT™ must be shared with parents within the first 30 days of enrollment or 2 weeks of enrollment during the school year. www.wida.us
  4. Identified English Learners (EL) Students A program services committee will design a Program Services Plan (PSP) for each identified EL student. The teacher will provide services throughout the year with appropriate instructional and assessment accommodations for each individual EL student. All identified EL students are required federally to be assessed annually with an English Language Proficiency test.
  5. W-APT™ Scores – Grades 1-12 For Grades 1-12, if a student scores an overall composite proficiency level of less than a 5.0 on the W-APT™ the student is considered an EL and will be placed in an EL program. The student will take ACCESS for ELLs® in January. For Grades 1-12, if a student scores an overall composite proficiency of a 5.0 on the W-APT™ the student is considered Initially Fully English Proficient (IFEP). The student is not an EL and will not take ACCESS for ELLs® in January.
  6. W-APT™ Scores – Kindergarten Since the K-WAPT™ assesses only listening and speaking and yields only an oral proficiency score (1-30),all kindergarteners regardless of their K-WAPT™ raw score, must be administered ACCESSthe following January in order to assess reading and writing. Kindergarten students cannot exit an EL program until after taking the first grade ACCESS for ELLs®. Parents can refuse EL services but the student will still have to take ACCESS for ELLs® in January.
  7. Kindergarten K-WAPT™ Program Options Listening & Speaking Domains
  8. Contact Information Chris Williams Office of Assessment and Accountability Division of Support and Research Chris.williams@education.ky.gov (502) 564-4394 ext. 4750 For more information, please contact WIDA Help Desk:1-866-276-7735 or help@wida.us
  9. ACCESS for ELLs® November 12, 2013 Chris Williams
  10. ACCESS for ELLs® 2013-14 ACCESS Testing Schedule
  11. ACCESS for ELLs®
  12. ACCESS for ELLs® Exit Criteria Overall Composite of a 5.0 on a Tier B or C and 4.0 or higher overall Literacy Composite.
  13. ACCESS for ELLs® ACCESS Ordering
  14. Ordering Materials Ordering window for ACCESS is October 10-November 7 MetriTechsent every DAC an e-mail on instructions for ordering their ACCESS materials and passwords DACs have to go to the MetriTech site to order ACCESS materials. Test booklets are ordered from MetriTech, Inc. online at www.metritech.com/wida, or by contacting MetriTechcustomer service at (800)747-4868
  15. Ordering Materials Districts will receive a 10% overage of ACCESS for ELLs® materials from MetriTech Do not over order; only order what the district needs
  16. Tier Placement for ACCESS for ELLs®Grades 1-12
  17. Profile 1: Fatima Fatima shows language skills typical of a student at level 3, Developing, in most classroom subjects. She is not yet approaching grade-level literacy in the core content areas. Tier B Which tier is most appropriate for Fatima?
  18. Profile 2: Mohammed Mohammed is in second grade and in his first year of instruction in English. He is comfortable with basic conversations outside the classroom, but struggles with even low-level reading tasks. Tier A Which tier is most appropriate for Mohammed?
  19. Profile 3: Esther Esther is approaching grade level literacy in the core academic content areas. Her teacher feels she will likely meet the state’s exit criteria for ELL support services by the end of the academic year. Which tier is most appropriate for Esther? Tier C
  20. Profile 4: Lily Lily shows some emerging proficiency in academic English. She seems comfortable interacting with her fluent English-speaking peers but Lily’s teacher characterizes her as a beginner in reading and writing. Which tier is most appropriate for Lily? A/B line  Tier B
  21. Profile 5: Byung Byung’s placement tests reveal level 4.8 oral proficiency in English, as well as grade-level literacy in his native language. His English reading and writing skills are lower. A portfolio of his work provides evidence that his literacy skills are not yet on grade level. Which tier is most appropriate for Byung? B/C line  Tier C
  22. ACCESS for ELLs® Pre-id Labels
  23. Fields in IC for the Pre-id Label Name (First, Last and Middle Initial) District Name and Code School Name and Code State Student ID (SSID) District ID (optional)- Do not use SSN #s Gender Grade Date of Birth
  24. ACCESS for ELLs® Pre-id Label
  25. Pre-id Labels for ACCESS
  26. ACCESS for ELLs® Accommodations
  27. ACCESS Accommodations Only applies to ELs with Disabilities Must have an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) or 504 Plan The accommodation must be stated in the IEP or 504 Plan and are marked yes or no and in what domain on the ACCESS roster Test Booklets are available in large print No Braille available Hearing impaired students only take the reading and writing parts of the test List of appropriate accommodations is located in the ACCESS for ELLs® manual and on the ACCESS online training site
  28. ACCESS for ELLs® Responsibilities and Testing Format
  29. What’s New for ACCESS for ELLs® New form of ACCESS for ELLs® this year is Form 302. Listening Test of ACCESS for ELLs®, will be media-based for all tiers and grades 1-12. The Reading Test is designed to take no more than 35-45 minutes. IEP or 504 Plan students who require an extended time accommodation will use media-based or script. There are no changes to the test administration procedures for the Speaking and Writing domains of the assessment.
  30. ACCESS for ELLs® Administration Before districts can administer ACCESS: Need to give the Administration Code and Inclusion of Special Populations training to their personnel Each new test administrator on his/her own has to have completed all 3 quizzes of the ACCESS training online with at least 80% accuracy on each quiz before the testing window begins with his/her own unique ACCESS password Remember to review all the ACCESS online training materials each year
  31. ACCESS for ELLs® Administration New personnel to your district will need their own ACCESS Training password. Do not share your ACCESS passwords. Districts will need to contact Chris Williams for ACCESS passwords. It is a secure test. Use a # 2 pencil, pens aren’t permitted. Grade/Tier Header sheets may be duplicated. Manuals, test materials and other forms can’t be duplicated. Test booklets may not be distributed to teachers and administrators prior to the testing dates.
  32. DAC or Designee Responsibilities Order materials from MetriTech Receive and inventory test materials Document any discrepancies on the Documentation of Materials Not Returned Form Coordinate the administration and distribution of test materials to schools among your districts Prepare a list of the following for each school: - Grades to be tested - Amount of testing materials required - Testing schedule Collect, organize and ship materials to MetriTech Complete rosters in SDRR
  33. BAC Responsibilities Report any discrepancies with testing materials to the DAC Inventory all ACCESS for ELLs® materials upon receipt from the DAC Train personnel with the current Administration Code and Inclusion of Special Populations documents Deliver and inventory the test materials to each test administrator each day Disseminate the testing schedules Verify the EL students who have an IEP or a 504 Plan to be given accommodations Report issues during testing to the DAC Add new students or make corrections to EL students in SDRR and IC Box up all the materials after testing to give to the DAC
  34. Test Administrator Responsibilities Have had current Administration Code and Inclusion of Special Populations Training Passed all quizzes on the ACCESS online course with at least 80% accuracy Read all the manuals Signed a Nondisclosure agreement Administered the ACCESS for ELLs® assessment Returned all testing materials to the BAC each day
  35. ACCESS for ELLs® Administration Test will be on Form 302 Listening, Reading and Writing- 3 levels of the test: Tiers A, B, and C Speaking has no tiers Listening, Reading and Writing- Grade level clusters: K, 1-2, 3-5, 6-8, and 9-12
  36. Standard 1 – Social & Instructional Language (SIL) English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes in the school setting. Standard 2 – Language of Language Arts (LoLA) English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Language Arts. Standard 3 – Language of Mathematics (LoMA) English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Mathematics. Standard 4 – Language of Science (LoSC) English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Science. Standard 5 – Language of Social Studies (LoSS) English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Social Studies. The WIDA ELD Standards
  37. Centrality of the ELD Standards W-APTandACCESS for ELLs® Summative “Large-scale”AssessmentFramework Formative “Classroom”AssessmentFramework Ongoing Instruction & Assessment English Language ProficiencyStandards& PerformanceDefinitions ModelPerformanceIndicators:Formative ModelPerformanceIndicators:Summative
  38. Overall Organization of Standards Grade Level Clusters (5)
  39. Levels of English Language Proficiency EMERGING
  40. Criteria for Performance Definitions EMERGING Linguistic Complexity: Expectations of the quantity and organization of the student’s verbal response Vocabulary Usage: Expectations of the student’s use of appropriate vocabulary for grade level and proficiency level; refers to language quality Language Control: Expectations of the student’s control of English grammar, word choice in context, and the English sound system; refers to language quality
  41. Elements of Model Performance Indicators The Model Performance Indicators consist of three elements: The language function describes how students use language - the intent of the communication The exampletopic or content stem specifies the context or topic that is addressed - a “curricular kernel” The type of support generates ideas for approaching instruction and assessment
  42. Organization of MPIs within Standards Level 2 Emerging
  43. MPIs as Basis of Test Items Level 2 Emerging Level 2: Beginning Match needed resources or supplies with type of activities from pictures and oral statements (e.g., calculators & mathematic books) Grades: 6-8 Standard 1: Social and Instructional Language Domain: Listening Example topic: Resources & Supplies
  44. Sequence of MPIs within a Theme FolderTier A Level 2 Emerging MPIs for a Tier A Theme Folder Grades: 6-8 Standard 1: Social and Instructional Language Domain: Listening Example topic: Resources & Supplies
  45. Sequence of MPIs within a Theme Folder Tier B Level 2 Emerging MPIs for a Tier B Theme Folder Grades: 6-8 Standard 1: Social and Instructional Language Domain: Listening Example topic: Resources & Supplies
  46. Sequence of MPIs within a Theme FolderTier C Level 2 Emerging Grades: 6-8 Standard 1: Social and Instructional Language Domain: Listening Example topic: Resources & Supplies MPIs for a Tier C Theme Folder
  47. Item Creation Process
  48. Group-Administered Components Listening, Reading and Writing Administered in groups of up to 22 students Centrally scored by MetriTech not by the Test Administrator Each grade level cluster and each tier must have separate group sessions The test administrator scripts arrive with the test booklets and are different for each test form Scripts are different for each grade level cluster and tier
  49. Test booklet sequence: 1) Listening 2) Reading 3) Writing Each test will begin with practice or sample items Tests are organized by theme folders – A series of questions about one topic with graphic and/or text support Each theme folder for Listening and Reading contains 3-4 items (test questions) Writing test includes 3 tasks except Grades 1-2 Tier A has 4 tasks Test Booklet Organization
  50. Test Administration Times Listening and Reading are administered together in one group session Listening Administration: 25-40 minutes Breakin between Listening and Reading sections: 5 minutes Reading Administration: 35-45 minutes Logistics: 15 minutes (approximately) Writing is administered in a separate group session Writing Administration: 60 minutes + 5 minutes to finish up (if necessary) Logistics: 10-15 minutes (approximately) 22 students per group session
  51. Scheduling Guidelines- Example
  52. How to Read the Script This page is an excerpt from the beginning of the Test Administrator’s Script that you will receive.
  53. Listening Test Overview The 2013-2014 Listening Test will be media-delivered (CD or streamed online). Format: Multiple choice, group administered Media: CD or streaming audio from the Internet Time: 25-40 minutes Scoring: Machine scored (by MetriTech, Inc.) 6-7 thematic folders: each folder is centered on one standard (Language of: Math, Science, Language Arts, Social Studies, Social Instructional)
  54. Rationale for Media-Delivered Listening Test Increase standardization of administration Ease the workload of test administrators Test items will be able to reflect more authentic listening scenarios
  55. Listening Test Equipment Needs For the media-delivered format, test administrators need one of the following: CD player Desktop/laptop computer (if playing the CD on the computer or streaming audio from the Internet) Speakers (headphones may not be used to administer the Listening Test) Administration procedures remain the same whether using an audio CD or streaming audio from the internet.
  56. Computer Requirements The table below indicates the necessary minimum computer requirements for streaming the audio.
  57. Listening Test Guidelines Check CD player or Internet connection strength prior to testing. Listen to all tracks. Follow the Test Administration Script exactly. Prior to administering the test, practice administering by listening to the practice items while reading the script. Each track may be played only once. Only under unusual circumstances may tracks be played again. Do not pause between tracks, a 25 second response time already incorporated into the audio. Answer choices may not be read aloud.
  58. Listening Test: Practice Items Two practice items are included to familiarize students with the structure of the test. Practice items will require the test administrator to pause and play the audio files during the track. Follow the instructions in the Test Administrator’s Script exactly. Pausing and playing between tracks are only done during practice items. Practice items are not scored.
  59. Listening Test Administration Once the Listening test has begun, do not stop or pause the audio. Let the tracks play through to the end. Track 13 contains a 45-second Check-in. Use this time to circulate the room and make sure that each student has followed the recording to this point, as indicated in the Test Administrator’s Script. Do not press Play or Pause during the Check-in; the track already incorporates 45 seconds of silence in the audio and will automatically advance to continue the test. Prior to the beginning of the next test item, the narrator in the recording will indicate that the test will resume soon.
  60. What to Do in Unusual Circumstances In an emergency event or other unusually disruptive situations such as, 1) a student illness during the test administration, 2) an announcement over the loudspeaker, 3) a fire drill, or 4) a loud noise outside, it is acceptable to stop or pause the audio and attend to the situation. After the situation has been resolved, resume the Listening Test from the beginning of the last test item that was being administered. In the event that you experience technical difficulties (e.g., the CD player stops working, the CD begins to skip, the Internet connection is interrupted, etc.), where a considerable amount of time has passed (15 minutes or more), begin the test from the beginning of the Part that was being administered when the interruption occurred.
  61. Reading Test Overview Format: Multiple choice, group administered Time: 35-45 minutes Scoring: Machine scored (by MetriTech, Inc.) 6-7 thematic folders: each folder is centered on one standard (LoMA, LoSC, LoLA, LoSS, SIL)
  62. Reading Test Guidelines Follow the Test Administration Script exactly Item prompts and answer choices may NOT be read aloud Keep the test going at a steady pace Circulate through the testing room and monitor student work
  63. Intended to help guide students through parts of the test Indicated with a stop sign Whole-group check-ins Check in with all of the students at the same time and explain the next part of the test. Occurs after every section in the 1-2A Reading Test. Individual check-ins Students raise their hand when they arrive at a stop sign and you check to see if students have completed the section. Occurs halfway through 1-2B, 1-2C, 3-5A, 3-5B, 6-8A, 9-12A and at the end of every reading test Individual & Group Check-ins
  64. Writing Test Overview Format: Student constructed responses, group administered Time: Up to 60-65 Scoring: Rater scored (by MetriTech) 3 Parts: (except Grades 1-2 Tier A has 4 Parts) The following standards are covered: Grades 1-2 Tier A: SIL Grades 3-12 Tier A: SIL, LoLA, LoMA/LoSC Grades 1-12 Tiers B & C: SIL, LoMA/LoSC, IT (LoLA/LoSS/SIL)
  65. Writing Test Guidelines Keep the test going at a steady pace Circulate through the testing room and monitor student work to keep pace Follow the Test Administration Script exactly Task items (unless scripted) may NOT be read aloud
  66. Individual and Group Check-ins The Writing Test also includes individual and whole-group check-ins After 10 minutes, 20 minutes, and 30 minutes, circulate in the room to monitor students’ progress. Students should be encouraged to keep pace so they can do their best on the longest task at the end. If necessary, you can prompt students who are lagging behind by saying, “Make sure you save enough time for the other parts.”
  67. Writing Rubric 2 Emerging
  68. Rater scored by MetriTech using the WIDA Writing Rubric. Student responses are considered first drafts produced under standard testing conditions. Students are not expected to replicate all stages of the writing process they may complete in the classroom. Students should address each task completely; however, the exact quantity of sentences written is not a scoring criterion. Scoring of the Writing Test
  69. Collect test materials after the Listening/ Reading sessions AND the Writing sessions ALWAYS follow test security policies When Test Administration isComplete
  70. Speaking Test Overview Format: Student constructed response, no tiers – adaptive format, individually administered Time: Up to 15 minutes per student Scoring: Rated by Test Administrator, scale & proficiency level scores calculated by MetriTech Ratings (exceeds/meets/approaches expectations) assigned using Speaking Rubric Each form contains three parts (A, B and C) Part A: tasks 1-3 cover SIL at proficiency levels 1-3 Part B: tasks 1-5 cover LoLA and LoSS at proficiency levels 1-5 Part C: tasks 1-5 cover LoMA and LoSC at proficiency levels 1-5
  71. Conducted in a one-on-one, question-answer format All questions are standardized and read from a script Student responses to questions are assessed for proficiency using the WIDA Speaking Rubric For extra assistance, a short description of the language you should expect from the student is included in the script Student responses are NOT assessed for accurate content Speaking Test Guidelines
  72. Format of the Speaking Test Speaking test contains A warm-up in which the test administrator puts the student at ease The test questions A wind-down in which the test administrator leaves the student with a positive impression of his or her performance on the test. Test questions are grouped into thematic folders (identified as “parts” within the test) The targeted proficiency level of each task increases throughout each part Test is “adaptive,” that is, questions are presented until the student reaches his or her performance ceiling
  73. Format of a Thematic Folder Each thematic folder includes a set of tasks and each task includes a set of questions The speaking test includes three thematic folders, identified as “parts” within the test Part A: tasks 1-3 cover SIL at proficiency levels 1-3 Part B: tasks 1-5 cover LoLA and LoSS at proficiency levels 1-5 Part C: tasks 1-5 cover LoMA and LoSC at proficiency levels 1-5 Each task is aimed at eliciting speech at one particular English Language Proficiency (ELP) level within the WIDA Speaking Rubric Task 1 aims for speech at ELP level 1 Task 2 aims for speech at ELP level 2 and so on for further tasks
  74. Every task and question is based on a set of expectations for what the response will look like Areas of speech around which scoring expectations are based: Linguistic Complexity: Expectations of the quantity and organization of the student’s verbal response Vocabulary Usage: Expectations of the student’s use of appropriate vocabulary for grade level and proficiency level; refers to language quality Language Control: Expectations of the student’s control of English grammar, word choice in context, and the English sound system; refers to language quality A short description of the language you should expect from the student is included in the script under the Expect box Task Level Expectations
  75. Speaking Rubric 2 Emerging Speaking Rubric
  76. The Scoring Scale
  77. Exceeds is used when a response scores beyond the expectations of the task Meets is always the intended target for a speaking task Approaches is used when the response does not meet one or more expectations of the task Exceeds Meets Approaches No Response Response Marks
  78. Scoring Rules A rating of Meets or Exceeds each receives a point value of 1 There are no extra points awarded a score of Exceeds The Exceeds rating indicates a strong expectation that the student will be able to respond with at least a Meets rating to the following task in the test A rating of Approaches or No Response each receives a point value of 0 The zero point value reflects the fact that the student could not meet one or more of the requirements of the scoring rubric
  79. Scoring Rules: Using “?” If in doubt between scoring Meets or Approaches on a task, you check the question mark “?” column on the score sheet and administer the next task If the student Meets the next task level expectation, assign that task a score of Meets, and go back and assign the previous task in question a score of Meets If the student fails to meet the task level expectations on the next task, it is most likely that the performance was also deficient on the previous task. Assign the current task a score of ApproachesorNo Response as appropriate, and go back and assign the previous task in question a score of Approaches The question mark CANNOT be used on the last task (T3 in Part A or T5 in Parts B and C)
  80. Scoring Guidelines The Speaking Test Scoring Sheet is the last page of the student test booklet Test administrators must make a mark on the scoring sheet immediately after the student responds to the last question in a task The answers to all questions in a task are evaluated holistically when making a judgment about the student’s performance on a given task. If the task has several main questions, only one needs to be answered appropriately to meet expectations, provided that one answer demonstrates the expected quality and quantity of language Students are assessed on what speech they produce, not whether they correctly answer the question you are posing
  81. Navigating the Speaking Test (Grades 1-12)
  82. Pathway Through the Speaking Test
  83. T2 Start procedure! The T2 Start procedure is being introduced in the Speaking test for students taking Tiers B or C of the Listening, Reading and Writing tests This procedure is intended to eliminate the T1 question(s) that may be too easy for students of higher proficiency Students taking Tiers B or C will begin the Speaking Test from Task 2 (T2) in Part A Whether or not the student will start on T2 of Part B and C will depend on his/her performance on the previous T2 Task Rating and scoring guidelines for each task and discontinuing procedures remain the same during the T2 Start procedure
  84. Additional Resources on the T2 Start Procedure Resources providing detailed administration guidelines and information: Online ACCESS for ELLs® Test Administrator Training Course- Speaking Module (from the WIDA website) View the T2 Start procedure Tutorial District and School Test Administration Manual (downloadable from the WIDA website) Presentation Administering the Speaking Test T-2 Start Procedure on this Tool Kit Supporting files in the Speaking Test Administration folder in this Tool Kit
  85. Speaking Test Scoring Sheet for Tier A The scoring sheet should be filled out completely; a score for every task must be marked Any task not administered because the student has reached a ceiling level within a part should be marked as Not Administered If a “?” is marked for a task and resolved with a Meets or Approaches by administering the following task, it is not necessary to erase the mark
  86. Speaking Test Scoring Sheet for Tiers B and C Updated score sheet reflecting the T2 Start procedure The scoring sheet should be filled out completely; a score for every task must be marked Any task not administered should be marked as Not Administered If a “?” is marked for a task and resolved with a Meets or Approaches by administering the following task, it is not necessary to erase the mark ACCESS for ELLs®
  87. Contact Information Chris Williams Office of Assessment and Accountability Division of Support and Research Chris.williams@education.ky.gov (502) 564-4394 ext. 4750 For more information, please contact WIDA Help Desk:1-866-276-7735 or help@wida.us
  88. Kindergarten ACCESS for ELLs® Chris Williams November 12, 2013
  89. To train Test Administrators to administer the Kindergarten ACCESS for ELLs® To understand the organization, layout and scripting of the tests To learn the procedures for administering and reliably scoring the tests Training Objectives
  90. Assesses students’ academic English language proficiency Academic language is the vocabulary, grammatical structures and discourse required in learning the academic content of school subject aspects of language strongly associated with literacy development and achievement Purpose of the Kindergarten Tests
  91. Standard 1 – Social & Instructional Language (SIL) English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes in the school setting. Standard 2 – Language of Language Arts (LoLA) English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Language Arts. Standard 3 – Language of Mathematics (LoMA) English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Math. Standard 4 – Language of Science (LoSC) English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Science. Standard 5 – Language of Social Studies (LoSS) English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Social Studies. The WIDA ELD Standards
  92. Centrality of the ELD Standards Summative “Large-scale”AssessmentFramework Formative “Classroom”AssessmentFramework Ongoing Instruction & Assessment W-APTandACCESS for ELLs® English Language ProficiencyStandards& PerformanceDefinitions ModelPerformanceIndicators:Formative ModelPerformanceIndicators:Summative
  93. Overall Organization of Standards Grade Level Clusters (5)
  94. Levels of English Language Proficiency EMERGING
  95. Criteria for Performance Definitions EMERGING Linguistic Complexity: Expectations of the quantity and organization of the student’s verbal response Vocabulary Usage: Expectations of the student’s use of appropriate vocabulary for grade level and proficiency level; refers to language quality Language Control: Expectations of the student’s control of English grammar, word choice in context, and the English sound system; refers to language quality
  96. The MPIs consist of three elements: The language function describes how students use language to demonstrate their proficiency The example topic specifies the context for language instruction, derived from state content standards The support includes instructional strategies or tools used to assist students in accessing content necessary for communication; can be sensory, graphic, or interactive Elements of MPIs
  97. Kindergarten Test Design Aligned to PreK-K Standards The test is thematically integrated within two stories: A narrative story An expository story All domains (listening, speaking, reading, writing) are tested within each story. All domains are individually administered and adaptive so the student will start sections at appropriate levels and stop at his or her “ceiling.” All components are scored by the Test Administrator (TA) during test administration. In its entirety, the test takes an average of 45 minutes.
  98. Unique Features of the Tests Manipulatives Cards Student ActivityBoard Thematic Test questions center around two themes All four domains are tested in each theme Interactive Writing Experience The student has an opportunity to produce whatever he/she is able
  99. Narrative vs. Expository Narrative: Appropriate graphics Main characters are animals Description Rhyme, Rhythm Reminiscent of quality children’s literature 3rd person Fictional Expository: Time sequence Non-fiction Involves “doing” or “how to” Realistic orbelievable actions with people as main characters Story sequence between steps, logical organization Relate to events in student’s life
  100. Test Structure The Test Administrator (TA) reads the Narrative storybook, then administers: Listening & Speaking Tests (together) Writing Experience Reading Test The TA will then administer the following sections using the Expository activity board and cards: Listening & Speaking Tests (together) Writing Experience (starting point is based on Writing Experience score from Part B) Reading Test (starting point based on Reading score from Part C)
  101. Kindergarten Test: Structure Move through the Levels of each part until student reaches his/her ceiling Listening and Speaking Writing Part E (Writing) and Part F (Reading) Starting points are determined by performance on prior Writing and Reading tasks Reading Listening and Speaking Writing Reading
  102. The Kindergarten Student Story Booklet contains: Pictures and story for the Narrative section of the test (resembling authentic children’s literature) Graphic organizers related to designated sections of the test Kindergarten Student Response Booklet contains: Answer key for Listening & Reading items Space to record and tally student responses Criteria for moving on/winding down Student writing and teacher transcription of student writing Testing Materials (1 of 2) Student Story Booklet Student Response Booklet
  103. Kindergarten Test Administrator Script contains: Moving on/winding down script Expect boxes to assist with scoring students’ speaking responses Kindergarten Student Activity Board Kindergarten Cards & Card Pouch Booklet Testing Materials (2 of 2) Test Administrator Script Student Activity Board Cards and Card Pouch Booklet
  104. Follow the script EXACTLY. Read aloud everything in blackbold andblue bold print Student responses must be recorded and scored IMMEDIATELY after each level is complete (e.g. after A3) You must administer and score all items in any one level of a Part before making a determination about whether to continue to the next level or to stop that Part Kindergarteners may need breaks during the test administration Stretch breaks may be taken between each section of the test (e.g. after Listening/Speaking, before Writing) The test may be administered in two sessions with a break of no more than 2 school days between Parts C (Narrative) & D (Expository) General Test Administration Procedures
  105. Symbols in the Script * asterisk Gray box indicates that cards should be face down Card used for modeling
  106. Familiarize yourself with the Test Administrator Script for each portion of the Kindergarten Test prior to administering the test. It is recommended to practice with a colleague before you administer to a student You will need 2 sharpened pencils: one for you and one for the student Testing should occur in a quiet room Administer the test to the student using a rectangular (preferable) or circular table Place yourself at a right angle to the student, rather than across from or next to the student Preparing for Test Administration
  107. About Accommodations Remember, test accommodations are only available to students with disabilities (IEP or 504 Plan in place). The Test Administration Manual contains definitions to explain how to use the accommodations, and coding information for the accommodations section.
  108. Accommodations Codes Test booklet coding for use of accommodations includes these categories:
  109. Format: Both domains are administered togetherbylevel. The Listening items for one level are administered, then the Speaking items for that same level are administered. Directions: Read the entire narrative story first, then go to the beginning of Part A (level A1) to administer Listening and Speaking. Move through the levels, A1 to A5, based on student’s responses. Guidelines:Follow the Test Administration Script exactly, including pauses. Keep the test going at a steady pace. Scoring: After the student answers all items in a level, complete the score sheet in the Student Response Booklet. Part A: Listening & Speaking
  110. Listening Items Listening items prompt the student to point to something in a picture, or point to and/or move a card. Do NOT read a Listening item more than one time. Scoring: Listening items are marked correct or incorrect.
  111. Speaking Items Speaking items prompt the student to talk about the pictures and the story. Scoring: There is guidance as to what to look for in a student response, found in the “Expect” box.Follow these guidelines to determine if the student meets or does not meet the task-level expectations. NOTE: These are based on the WIDA Speaking Rubric. Refer to the rubric if you have questions.
  112. Every task is based on a set of expectations for what the response should look like. The TA rates each task holistically, considering the response to all questions in the task. Scoring expectations are based on: Linguistic Complexity: Expectations of the quantity and organization of the student’s verbal response Vocabulary Usage: Expectations of the student’s use of appropriate vocabulary for grade level and proficiency level; refers to language quality Language Control: Expectations of the student’s control of English grammar, word choice in context, and the English sound system; refers to language quality Task Level Expectations
  113. Meets vs. Approaches “Meets” is highlighted on the scale to emphasize that Meets is the expected score. Tasks are designed to elicit speech that will meet all expectations of the proficiency level it targets.
  114. The TA must score the item immediately after the student responds to the last question in a task. If unsure whether to score a response Meets or Approaches, the “?” (question mark) box can be marked. Then administer the next task. If the response to the next task scores Meets, go back and rate the previous task (the one with ? marked) Meets. If the response to that next task scores Approaches, go back and rate the previous task Approaches. Note: The last task on a Part may not be scored with a “?”. The rating represents the student’s performance on the complete task, not on individual questions within the task. Scoring Rules
  115. Speaking Rubric 2 Emerging Speaking Rubric
  116. Test Navigation There is a “Moving On” section of the script, which indicates what you are to do next after scoring a level. You are always moving ahead in the test, either to the next level in the same Part, or to the next Part of the test if the child does not meet expectations. Only after Part F do you end the test.
  117. Part B: Writing Experience Format: There are two tasks in this Part of the Writing Test, assessing five levels. First, the student writes his/her name as a screening task. If done successfully, the student proceeds to the Writing Experience. In the Writing Experience, the script prompts the student to talk about something from the story, then write it. If the student is struggling, there are prompts to scaffold the student to write words and sounds. Scoring: Based on the PreK/K Writing Rubric
  118. Part B: Student Response Booklet Left page (Teacher’s page) Right page (Student’s Page) Transcribe what the student says he/she wrote in the box.
  119. Scoring in Writing The student writes in the Student Response Booklet. After the student writes, the TA transcribes what the student says he/she wrote. Score the writing as “High,” “Mid,” or “Low” immediately and check off the box at the bottom of Part B in the Student Response Booklet. Assign the writing a score of 1-6 using the Writing Rubric after the student completes the entire test.
  120. High, Mid, Low The Expect box for writing contains the criteria to determine the starting point in Part E (Writing).
  121. K Writing Rubric (1 of 3)
  122. K Writing Rubric (2 of 3)
  123. K Writing Rubric (3 of 3)
  124. Part C: Reading Format: There are five levels of tasks on the Reading Test. Tasks include matching cards, categorizing pictures, and pointing to a picture. Some of the initial tasks assess pre-literacy skills. Scoring: Reading items are each scored correct or incorrect. Based on how many tasks the student correctly completed, score the student’s performance as “High,” “Mid,” or “Low” and record in Part F in the Student Response Booklet. This will determine the starting point in the next Part of the Reading test.
  125. Part D: Listening and Speaking Tests Listening & Speaking like Part A Based on the Activity Board Open and close panels as directed Follow the script exactly Begin at level D1, and administer Part D until student reaches his/her ceiling Scoring rules for Part D are the same as for Part A
  126. Part E: Writing Leveled writing tasks Entrance point based on student’s performance on Part B. Mark the student’s starting point in Part E under theStarted Here column If “High” start with E4/5 If “Mid” start with E3 If “Low” start with E1
  127. If a student is unable to complete the task or scores only one item correctly, the test administrator will mark Stopped Here, indicating that the student is done with this Writing section. Part E: Writing
  128. Part E: Scoring Guidance E1 – E3 Leveled Tasks : Scored as Correct or Incorrect. If the student completes a level successfully (following the Stop If criteria), move on to the next level. E4/5 Writing Experience Task: Rated using the PreK-K Writing Rubric. The test administrator assigns the writing a score of 1-6 using the Writing Rubric after the student completes the entire test.
  129. Part F: Reading There are 5 levels of Reading tasks in Part F. Entrance point based on student’s performance on Part C. Mark the student’s starting point in Part F under theStarted Here column If “High” start with F4 (reading short phrases) If “Mid” start with F3 (reading words) If “Low” start with F1 (pre-literacy task) Scoring Part F is the same as scoring Part C. Both F1 and C1 require you to MOVE ON, regardless of the number of correct answers.
  130. Positive Reinforcement Be sure you end the test with something the student can do so that students leave with a positive feeling about the experience. In Listening Parts: If the student clearly does not understand the listening task, you may repeat the model. If the student still doesn’t understand, continue modeling with the other items, but score them as incorrect. In Speaking Parts: If the student says “I don’t know” you may assist him/her, but mark the answer “Approaches.” In Writing Parts: If the student cannot write sentences, prompt him/her to write single words or letters. In Reading Parts: If the student can’t read words or sentences encourage him/her to identify a sound or a picture he/she recognizes.
  131. Challenge: Behavior of Kindergarteners Kindergarten students need more stretch breaks: this should be at the discretion of the TA when he/she senses fatigue or distraction. Kindergarten students are easily distracted Extra effort should be made to ensure the testing area is quiet and away from student traffic. Although TAs should be ready to redirect students to the task, the scripts will include advice for extra prompting.
  132. Challenge: Literacy of Young Learners All Kindergarteners are developing literacy skills; the test will therefore include some pre-reading and pre-writing tasks. Additionally, at this developmental level, writing and reading skills are very intertwined, yet Federally requires testing these as discrete skills. The existing WIDA Writing Rubric has been modified for the Kindergarten level to reflect rules for “inventive spelling” and task level expectations.
  133. Take time before test administration to establish rapport with the student. Experience with young students is recommended for TAs for the Kindergarten test. Make extra effort to put the student at ease: Small talk on the way to the testing area Say, “We’re going to play some games/read a book” Establish age/birthday Talk about what they were doing in class, what they had for lunch, who is in their family, their favorite food, etc. Challenge: Maximizing Student Performance
  134. Challenge: Training Test Administrators Given the requirements of the scoring and the quantity of materials used in the test, sufficient training must be made available to test administrators. Additional training resources: Kindergarten Test Administration Training Video Complete Test Administration Scoring and adaptivity instructions Online Training Course at www.wida.us Speaking sound files Scored writing samples Kindergarten Test Administrator Manual Face-to-face training in your state or district Practice giving a test to a colleague
  135. Contact Information Chris Williams Office of Assessment and Accountability Division of Support and Research Chris.williams@education.ky.gov (502) 564-4394 ext. 4750 For more information, please contact WIDA Help Desk:1-866-276-7735 or help@wida.us
  136. Alternate ACCESS for ELLs® November 12, 2013 Chris Williams
  137. ACCESS for ELLs® Alternate ACCESS
  138. Alternate ACCESS for ELLs® A paper-pencil test for grades 1-12 It will occur during the ACCESS for ELLs® testing window Individualized Education Program (IEP) team determines whether the student takes Alternate ACCESS or ACCESS To participate in Alternate ACCESS Classified as an English Learner (EL) Has a disability Participates or is expected to participate in the Alternate K-PREP Disability precludes taking the ACCESS for ELLs® with accommodations
  139. Alternate ACCESS for ELLs® Participation Guidelines
  140. Contact Information Chris Williams Office of Assessment and Accountability Division of Support and Research Chris.williams@education.ky.gov (502) 564-4394 ext. 4750 For more information, please contact WIDA Help Desk:1-866-276-7735 or help@wida.us
  141. ACCESS for ELLs® Forms November 12, 2013 Chris Williams
  142. ACCESS for ELLs® Forms
  143. District Shipping Form
  144. Security Checklist
  145. Master Materials List
  146. School Materials List
  147. District Materials List (Overage)
  148. WIDA Agreement to Maintain Confidentiality Letter
  149. WIDA Agreement to MaintainConfidentiality Form
  150. School List for Pre-Id Labels
  151. Packing List
  152. Packing ACCESS Materials
  153. Packing ACCESS Materials
  154. Additional Materials Order Form
  155. School Header Sheet
  156. Unused and Non Scorable Testing Materials
  157. Documentation of Materials Not Returned
  158. Returning ACCESS Materials
  159. Optional Services and Reports
  160. ACCESS Growth Charts Growth data for all students with two years of test scores for multiple two-year-spans (2009 to 2010, 2010 to 2011, 2011 to 2012, 2012 to 2013 and 2013-2014) Growth data for every domain and composite at each grade level District-level and school-level reports Bar charts and scatter plots showing students’ growth compared to WIDA-wide growth Match rates tables that show the number and percent of students with two years of scores Downloadable CSV files of student data Cost: $200 per district, additional .15 per student Contact: MetriTech
  161. Future ACCESS 2.0 will be operational in 2015-16 It will be an online assessment Kentucky will field test 2014-15 in the domain of listening
  162. Contact Information Chris Williams Office of Assessment and Accountability Division of Support and Research Chris.williams@education.ky.gov (502) 564-4394 ext. 4750 For more information, please contact WIDA Help Desk:1-866-276-7735 or help@wida.us