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Using this Tutorial

Using this Tutorial

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Using this Tutorial

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  1. Using this Tutorial • use sidebar menu on left to go directly to the relevant section required • use the button on the top right of the screen to quit the tutorial. This tutorial is set up as a slide show. For navigation through the tutorial: There are also links embedded in various slides which you can follow to get more detail on a particular subject. These will be highlighted like this as text links, or as graphics with text ( ). When you place your mouse pointer over the text or graphic the icon will change to the hand ( ) symbol, indicating that a link exists. Note – items may open behind the slide show. Press the Windows button on your keyboard to switch to them Link Please Note: This tutorial is a guide only – please download the official “Guidelines for completion of the new PMDS Form” from www.per.gov.ie Begin

  2. Introduction Performance Management and Development System • Review and evaluation of PMDS by this Department identified a need to simplify and streamline the process. • To address this, we have developed a new PMDS form as the first step. • We have combined the 3 existing forms into a new single form that helps everyone to: • Plan goals; • Identify learning needs; and • Provide constructive feedback. • We consulted Personnel Officers across the Civil Service during the design phase and then agreed the form between management and staff unions. • This tutorial provides guidance to you in filling out the new PMDS form whether you’re a Jobholder or Manager.

  3. New Form PMDS Form 2012 • The purpose of the new form is to provide a tool for you and your Manager in managing performance. • The main changes are: • One condensed form replacing the Role Profile, Interim and Annual Review forms; • Information on cost centre, budget and salary element of budget. This section is optional for 2012 and your HR Unit will decide if this information is required; • Section on setting goals and tasks with a focus on how to measure progress and results; • Priority Goal on Performance Management for all Managers; • A Learning and Development Plan which includes the cost of formal training. The cost section is optional for 2012; • Managers who do not proactively manage the performance of their staff, including completion of PMDS, cannot be rated above “2”; • Rating of “3” is highlighted as the fully acceptable level of performance; • Feedback Conversation replaces “Upward Feedback” on the “old” forms; and • A new Career Development section.

  4. Stage 1 Stage 1 Personal Details Goal Setting Towards the end of the year you need to plan for the coming year. You should agree your performance goals with your Manager, set out how achievement of these goals will be measured, identify the competencies needed to achieve the goals and what your learning and development objectives are. Remember, your goals should be linked with your business plan so that your performance benefits the organisation effectively. Click on the buttons to the left to see the details of each section of Stage 1. Cost Centres & Budgets Purpose of my Job Setting my Goals Achieving my Goals Learning and Development

  5. Stage 1 Stage 1 Personal Details Personal Details All staff need to complete this section. You should fill in your name, grade, section and your direct Manager – this is the same as the “old” Role Profile form. In addition, you need to fill in your current salary. Cost Centres & Budgets Purpose of my Job Setting my Goals Achieving my Goals Learning and Development

  6. Stage 1 Stage 1 Personal Details • Cost Centres & Budgets • If you are a Manager and have responsibility for a specified annual financial allocation, that is, a Cost Centre and/or you have staff reporting directly to you, then you should fill in this section of the form. • This helps to focus on the cost of resources for which you are responsible. • It should help you to link the outputs of your staff with the overall cost to the taxpayer of the resources. • It will be optional for 2012 (the first year of operation) until organisations can ensure that this information is easily available to Managers. • You should provide the following: • Cost Centre(s) that you have responsibility for; • Total amount available to you in your Cost Centre(s); and • Total cost of salaries of staff reporting to you. Cost Centres & Budgets Purpose of my Job Setting my Goals Achieving my Goals Learning and Development

  7. Stage 1 Stage 1 Personal Details Purpose of my Job This section remains the same as the “old” Role Profile form. All staff need to fill it in. This is where you make the critical link between your role and the Strategic Objectives of the organisation – as set out in the Business Plan / Statement of Strategy of your organisation. Cost Centres & Budgets Purpose of my Job Setting my Goals Achieving my Goals Learning and Development

  8. Stage 1 Stage 1 Personal Details • Setting my Goals • All staff complete this section. It replaces the following sections in the “old” Role Profile form - Longer Term Objectives; Key Objectives; Key Performance Indicators; and Critical Success Factors. • You should identify your work goals and the tasks that are needed to achieve them. These goals should be SMART (see menu item). Each goal should have tasks with specific dates for completion. Do not use language such as “ongoing” or “as required”. • You should limit the number of goals to the critical ones. The number of goals defined should be between 3 and 5 but this will vary from role to role. • Goals should be measured by using indicators such as: • Output – e.g., completion rates, number or type of outputs in an agreed timeframe, savings without reductions in service • Qualitative – e.g., satisfaction surveys, stakeholder feedback Cost Centres & Budgets Purpose of my Job Setting my Goals Achieving my Goals Learning and Development Note to Managers

  9. Stage 1 Stage 1 Personal Details Setting my Goals Note to Managers If you are a Manager your first goal must be – “Manage the performance of the staff reporting to me” The management of staff performance in this context takes in the setting of their performance and learning goals and regular review and feedback on their performance. It is not only the completion of their PMDS. You should ensure that all Jobholders reporting to you have their own individual goals and tasks for which they are responsible. Cost Centres & Budgets Purpose of my Job Setting my Goals Achieving my Goals Learning and Development

  10. Stage 1 Stage 1 Personal Details Achieving my Goals This section is completed by all staff. It replaces the following sections in the “old” forms – Competencies; Skills and Knowledge. This section creates a direct link between the goals set and the competencies. Using the Competency Framework (see menu item) you should identify the competencies that are most relevant to achieving your goals and then choose the appropriate statements to describe them. Cost Centres & Budgets Purpose of my Job Setting my Goals Achieving my Goals Learning and Development Note to HR Units

  11. Stage 1 Stage 1 Personal Details Achieving my Goals Note to HR Units Departments / Divisions should continue to identify core competencies from the framework for their Jobholders where this is appropriate. Cost Centres & Budgets Purpose of my Job Setting my Goals Achieving my Goals Learning and Development

  12. Stage 1 Stage 1 Personal Details Learning and Development This section is completed by all staff. This gives you an opportunity to consider how you could do your job better by identifying your learning and development needs – and how these can be provided. This section relates to the requirements of your current job - longer term learning and development needs are included in the Career Development section (see menu item). If you identify formal training courses they should be costed and the amount entered in the relevant column – for value-for-money purposes. Your Departmental Training Unit (DTU) or the Civil Service Training and Development Centre (CSTDC) can supply this information. The costing of courses is optional for 2012 so that organisations can develop systems to make this information available to you. This section of the form should be sent to your DTU when completed. Cost Centres & Budgets Purpose of my Job Setting my Goals Achieving my Goals Learning and Development Note to Managers and HR Units

  13. Stage 1 Stage 1 Personal Details Learning and Development Note to Managers and HR Units Learning and Development is a fundamental element of PMDS. For performance to improve there must be developmental opportunities for staff. It is recommended that all staff identify learning and development needs each year. Departments are encouraged to make this a mandatory element of PMDS. In particular, Departments may wish to explore schemes of formal continuous professional development (CPD) for various groups of staff, e.g., Managers, HR Staff, IT Staff etc. This approach then becomes an important first step in introducing CPD across the whole organisation. Cost Centres & Budgets Purpose of my Job Setting my Goals Achieving my Goals Learning and Development

  14. Stage 2 Stage 2 Self Assessment Interim Review To make performance management effective you should be reviewing your performance on a regular basis, for example monthly or bi-monthly. This is the best way that you can ensure an improvement in your performance. Stage 2 provides for a formal review – the Interim Review - 6 months after you have completed Stage 1. It is also vital that underperformance is addressed as soon as it is identified. You can read the guidelines on “Management of Underperformance” on the Public Expenditure & Reform website under the following link – Underperformance Click on the buttons to the left to see the details of each section of Stage 2. Interim Review Meeting Sign-off Note to Managers

  15. Stage 2 Stage 2 Self Assessment Interim Review Note to Managers As a Manager you should ensure that there are no surprises at the Interim Review stage. Where there are issues or difficulties in respect of performance these should be addressed as and when they arise. Do not ‘save them up’ for the Interim Review stage. Where performance issues exist you should refer to the ‘Management of Underperformance Guidelines’ on the Public Expenditure and Reform website under the following link – Underperformance. It is important that Jobholders are given clear and constructive feedback. It is equally important that they are given an opportunity to put their own views forward during the Feedback Conversation (see menu item). Interim Review Meeting Sign-off

  16. Stage 2 Stage 2 Self Assessment • Self Assessment • You should fill in the relevant sections of the form that relate to the Interim Review as a “self-assessment”. Your completed form should be given to your Manager prior to the Interim Review Meeting. • Your self-assessment acts as a starting point for the discussion you have with your Manager at the meeting. • Before filling in the sections you should review the following: • Setting My Goals – the interim review box allows for any changes in goals or associated tasks to be recorded; • Achieving My Goals; and • Learning and Development Plan. • If progress has not been to the expected standard as a direct result of factors outside your control then you can reflect this in the commentary. Interim Review Meeting Sign-off

  17. Stage 2 Stage 2 Self Assessment Interim Review Meeting When you have completed your self-assessment you should meet with your Manager to discuss the performance in the review period. Any changes to goals, tasks, competencies or learning and development needs should be covered in this meeting. Interim Review Meeting Sign-off

  18. Stage 2 Stage 2 Self Assessment Sign-off Stage 2 is completed when you and your Manager have agreed the assessment of your performance at the end of your Interim Review meeting. Both parties should sign the form indicating this agreement. Interim Review Meeting Sign-off

  19. Stage 3 Stage 3 Self Assessment Annual Review At the end of the PMDS cycle (normally 12 months after Stage 1) an Annual Review should take place between you and your Manager. This is a fundamental part of the process. You, and your Manager, should view this as an opportunity to build further improvements in your performance for the following year. At every stage of the PMDS process there should be no surprises, and this is also true of the Annual Review stage. This is a two-way process, so you should have no surprises for your Manager at this stage. If there are issues they should be dealt with as they arise as part of the ongoing performance management process. Click on the buttons to the left to see the details of each section of Stage 3. Annual Review Meeting Sign-off Rating Goal 1 Note to Managers

  20. Stage 3 Stage 3 Self Assessment Annual Review Note to Managers You should give special attention when awarding a rating to your staff. A rating of 3 should be seen as the Jobholder performing to the required standard for their role. It should not be seen as a negative rating. As a Manager you should be aware of attendance and how it impacts on a Jobholder’s performance. If you have an issue with attendance patterns it should be dealt with as it occurs and not ‘held over’ until the Annual Review. If you are dealing with attendance issues you should take account of the guidelines set out in Circular 9/2010 (see Personnel Code website). The Jobholder should be given an opportunity to comment on their attendance patterns if they consider it necessary. A rating higher than 3 should only be awarded in cases where the performance has significantly exceeded the required standard. Annual Review Meeting Sign-off Rating Goal 1

  21. Stage 3 Stage 3 Self Assessment • Self Assessment • You should fill in the relevant sections of the form that relate to the Annual Review as a “self-assessment”. • Your completed form should be given to your Manager prior to the Annual Review Meeting. • Your self-assessment acts as a starting point for the discussion you have with your Manager at the meeting. • Before filling in the sections you should review the following: • Setting My Goals; • Achieving My Goals; • Learning and Development Plan; and • Assessment of performance at Interim Review stage. • If progress has not been to the expected standard as a direct result of factors outside your control then you can reflect this in the commentary. Annual Review Meeting Sign-off Rating Goal 1

  22. Stage 3 Stage 3 Self Assessment Annual Review Meeting When you have completed your self-assessment you should meet with your Manager to discuss the performance in the review period. Any changes to goals, tasks, competencies or learning and development needs should be covered in this meeting. Annual Review Meeting Sign-off Rating Goal 1

  23. Stage 3 Stage 3 Self Assessment Sign-off Your Manager will complete the assessment of performance on the form and award a rating to you following your discussion. Account should be taken of the agreed goals in Stage 1 and 2, tasks, competencies, learning and development and any attendance issues that might have arisen during the year that impacted on performance. If you agree the assessment of performance with your Manager you should indicate this by both signing off on this part of the form. Every effort should be made to reach agreement on the Annual Review assessment. Where agreement cannot be reached the assessment is reviewed by an appropriate Reviewer with the opportunity to comment. A copy of the assessment section is then forwarded to your HR Unit – this includes the narrative, the rating and any comment on attendance. Annual Review Meeting Sign-off Rating Goal 1

  24. Stage 3 Stage 3 Self Assessment • Rating Goal 1 • The purpose of Goal 1 is to ensure that you, as a Manager, have proactively managed the performance of your staff effectively. • You do this by: • setting goals; • identifying learning and development needs; and • reviewing and assessing performance. PMDS is the formal structure for this process and the completion of the PMDS form is the evidence that this has taken place. If you have not done this for all staff* then you have not completed Goal 1 and therefore you will not receive a rating above 2. *Common sense should be applied to the term ”All Staff” taking account of circumstances where staff are absent from the workplace, e.g., on maternity leave, special leave, sick leave etc. Annual Review Meeting Sign-off Rating Goal 1

  25. Feedback Conversation Feedback Conversation • This section (which replaces the Upward Feedback of the “old” Annual Review form) is optional for you. If you choose not to take this opportunity then you must record this fact. However, it is recommended that you take the opportunity to have an open discussion with your Manager. • You should discuss how you feel you are being managed. • The discussion should focus mainly but not exclusively on: • Your role and responsibilities; • The value of your job to the organisation; • How your job is structured; • How your work is distributed; and • Your Learning and Development Plan. • You also have the opportunity to suggest ways in which you could add value to your role including: taking on new challenges; increasing efficiencies; creating developmental opportunities for you or for the team; and suggesting improvements to how things are done. more…..

  26. Feedback Conversation Giving Feedback Receiving Feedback Feedback Conversation Any feedback given by you should then be discussed by your Manager with their immediate Manager, and should form part of your Manager’s development programme for the following year. Although the Feedback Conversation replaces the Upward Feedback section of the previous Annual Review form, under the provision of General Council Report 1398 you can still constructively comment on how you are being managed, the running of your section/division and how PMDS is operating within your organisation. To use Feedback as a developmental process the language used and the messages conveyed should be non-judgemental and constructive in nature. Below are behavioural guidelines for giving and receiving feedback

  27. Feedback Conversation • Giving Feedback • Prepare carefully beforehand. • Be helpful and direct – language should be non-judgmental and constructive. • Own your message – use “I” statements; don’t generalise; take responsibility for your thoughts, feelings and actions. • Ensure that there is a balance in the feedback being given. • Support your comments with evidence – give clear examples to describe behaviour. • Focus on the issue or behaviour, not on the person – don’t threaten the person, but focus on their behaviour and your reaction to it. • Pose the situation as a mutual problem – remember: your personal feelings and thoughts are reactions to an interpersonal issue. • Give the recipient an opportunity to clarify what you said – make sure they understand properly; don’t start new misunderstandings • Above all, show respect for the other person. • Return Feedback Conversation Giving Feedback Receiving Feedback

  28. Feedback Conversation • Receiving Feedback • Prepare carefully beforehand. • Accept the feedback given, in a spirit of cooperativeness. • Listen actively and with an open mind – try to hear the message, rather than react defensively. • Ask for clarification if you do not fully understand the feedback. • Try to avoid the possibility of arguing, denying or justifying. Look for the developmental aspect – ask ‘what can I learn from this?’ • Thank the giver, and say that you intend to reflect on the information you have received. • Above all, show respect for the other person. • Return Feedback Conversation

  29. Career Development Career Development • This part of the form replaces the Suitability for Promotion section of the “old” Annual Review form. This section is optional for you. • However, we recommend that you and your Manager should look at your future career ambitions for the medium and longer term. You should try to evaluate the steps needed to fulfil your career aims. • You should consider your career objectives and how they might be achieved, including: • Mobility; • Transfer to another type of work; • Longer term learning and development; and • Promotion. • You complete this section yourself before the Annual Review meeting. This allows your Manager to prepare a response to your objectives. • You and your Manager should discuss practical ways to achieve your objectives. For example, you should look at the competencies required for the grade if you are looking at promotion. • Learning and development objectives listed here should relate to your future requirements, not your current role. If you identify something for your current role then it should be listed in your Learning and Development Plan.

  30. SMART Goals SMART Goals Specific Measurable Achievable Relevant Timebound The setting of goals is an essential part of the PMDS process. Using the “SMART” technique, outlined here, will help you set more concise Priority Goals and tasks. This will ensure that goals are clearer, provide stimulation and challenge, and will encourage a more objective assessment of performance. Click on each of the tabs above to see the attributes of a SMART goal.

  31. SMART Goals SMART Goals Specific Measurable Achievable Relevant Timebound Goals are written in explicit terms, defining the output. There should be no doubt about what is to be achieved by the individual/team.

  32. SMART Goals SMART Goals Specific Measurable Achievable Relevant Timebound • Individuals will need to know not only what they are accountable for but also how performance will be measured. • Goals will obviously vary between individuals and therefore a variety of types of measures will be necessary. • The most common types are: • Quality; • Quantity; • Time; and • Cost.

  33. SMART Goals SMART Goals Specific Measurable Achievable Relevant Timebound Goals must be challenging and motivating rather than easy to achieve. But they must also be reasonable. They should represent a degree of ‘stretch’ in terms of resources, personal challenge and authority.

  34. SMART Goals SMART Goals Specific Measurable Achievable Relevant Timebound Ensure that the goals are written to drive these actions and produce results which are part of the strategic direction of the team, division and organisation. These will be set out in the organisation’s Strategic Statement and Business Plan for the area/section.

  35. SMART Goals SMART Goals Specific Measurable Achievable Relevant Timebound SMART goals will have specific time scales and target dates. Key dates are important to ensure that activities are structured effectively and deadlines met.

  36. Competency Framework Competency Framework • The Competency Framework describes the Knowledge, Skills, Behaviours and Attributes required to successfully accomplish your job. • The focus is on what competencies you need to perform your job effectively. • It is important that you and your Manager discuss and agree the standard of proficiency for each competency selected. • At this point consideration must be given to the behavioural competencies that you need to have and to demonstrate, to be successful in performing your role. • These competencies are specific to your role at a particular time rather than to you. • When you and your Manager review performance you should take the following into account when looking at what competencies have been demonstrated: • Weight – are some competencies more important to achieve; • Challenge – how do the competencies demonstrated represent a personal challenge; and • Constraints – are there any factors, either within or outside your control, that restrict you from demonstrating the competency. more…..

  37. Competency Framework Competency Framework There are 17 competencies that have been identified as being important to the work of the Civil Service. These competencies are grouped into the following 4 clusters: Personal Effectiveness– how we manage ourselves Thinking Style & Problem Solving – effective analysis Managing for Results – better management Group & Interpersonal Effectiveness – how we effect desired responses in others Each competency has a number of descriptive statements to help relate the competency to the job. Since jobs and roles vary, so do the competencies. The most effective way to use the framework is for you to identify 3 to 5 of the most important behavioural competencies required for you to do your job well. Concentrate on developing and demonstrating these initially. Your competencies will be matched to your goals. Remember – your section / division / organisation may have some ‘core’ competencies that they require all staff to demonstrate. Selecting Required Competencies

  38. Competency Framework Competency Framework Identify the 3 to 5 most important behavioural competencies you need to do your job well from the list (see link below). For each of these, select the statement or combination of statements which best reflects what is expected of you in your role. This will help to clarify the standard of proficiency you require in your job. You should agree this selection with your Manager. Once you have agreed the competencies and statements, your Manager should discuss whether you and/or the team: already exceed the required standard; is/are at that standard; or fall short of it. Where there is a shortfall you should agree with your Manager what actions are needed to bridge the gap, e.g., training, task assignment, learning & development. Competencies List

  39. Competency Framework Competency Framework Personal Effectiveness Achievement Drive/Commitment Self Confidence Initiative Teamworking Communications Thinking Style & Problem Solving Analytical Thinking Conceptual Thinking Decision Making/Judgement Specialised Expertise Managing for Results Managing Budgets & Resources Information Seeking and Management Concern for clarity and work quality Group & Interpersonal Effectiveness Networking/Influencing Interpersonal Understanding Customer Service Managing & Developing People Leadership

  40. Competency Framework Personal Effectiveness Achievement Drive / Commitment Self Confidence These competencies determine how we manage ourselves. Click each one for a description Initiative Team Working Communication Competencies List

  41. Competency Framework Achievement Drive / Commitment Personal Effectiveness Achievement Drive / Commitment Achievement Drive / Commitment The need to meetand surpasshighstandards of performance Self Confidence The job requires me to ……….? • Have a strong focus on results. • Set new challenges and strive for improvement. • Set challenging standards and goals for yourself and others. Initiative Team Working Communication Competencies List

  42. Self Confidence Competency Framework Personal Effectiveness Self Confidence Achievement Drive / Commitment The need to show high levels of confidence in one’s own ability to complete a task and select effective approaches to solving problems Self Confidence The job requires me to ……….? • Work confidently within agreed parameters. • Take and stand by decisions. • Deal confidently with difficult situations and setbacks. • Present oneself with assurance. Initiative Team Working Communication Competencies List

  43. Competency Framework Initiative Personal Effectiveness Initiative Achievement Drive / Commitment The need to act creatively and be forward thinking to anticipate problems and crises Self Confidence The job requires me to ……….? • Anticipate what needs to be done, and do it. • Anticipate what needs to be done, do it, and go beyond what’s expected. • Make forward plans and be adaptable to changing circumstances. • Be capable of new thinking and be creative in developing effective solutions. Initiative Team Working Communication Competencies List

  44. Team Working Competency Framework Personal Effectiveness Team Working Achievement Drive / Commitment The ability to work well and cooperate with others, to be part of a team Self Confidence The job requires me to ……….? • Be a good team player, work well with others. • Encourage and support others. • Seek to resolve team tensions. Initiative Team Working Communication Competencies List

  45. Competency Framework Communication Personal Effectiveness Communication Achievement Drive / Commitment The ability to communicate with others in a manner that conveys the key message(s) and is appropriate to the audience Self Confidence The job requires me to ……….? • Be willing and able to communicate. • Present factual information effectively, both orally and in written form. • Have good writing skills. • Be effective in oral presentation. • Be a persuasive communicator. Initiative Team Working Communication Competencies List

  46. Competency Framework Thinking Style and Problem Solving Analytical Thinking Conceptual Thinking These competencies relate to effective analysis and problem solving. Click each one for a description Decision Making / Judgement Specialist Expertise Competencies List

  47. Competency Framework Analytical Thinking Thinking Style and Problem Solving Analytical Thinking Analytical Thinking The ability to understand a complex problem or situation and approach it in a step-by-step way Conceptual Thinking The job requires me to ……….? • Breakdown my job into simple steps. • Think through issues logically and set priorities. • See relationships between issues and identify coherent solutions. Decision Making / Judgement Specialist Expertise Competencies List

  48. Competency Framework Conceptual Thinking Thinking Style and Problem Solving Conceptual Thinking Analytical Thinking The ability to identify patterns or connections between situations that are not obviously related and to identify key or underlying issues in complex situations Conceptual Thinking The job requires me to ……….? • See patterns/trends in data. • See the links between related information. • Provide clear and useful explanations. • Think creatively – “outside-the-box”. • Think strategically. Decision Making / Judgement Specialist Expertise Competencies List

  49. Competency Framework Decision Making / Judgement Thinking Style and Problem Solving Decision Making / Judgement Analytical Thinking The ability to make informed decisions or judgements about situations or issues where a course of action is needed Conceptual Thinking The job requires me to ……….? • Assemble facts and outline courses of action. • Weigh up pros and cons and make recommendations. • Consult and seek advice when there is no precedent. • Apply good judgement, especially where a degree of risk exists. • Make decisions where there are conflicting issues. Decision Making / Judgement Specialist Expertise Competencies List

  50. Competency Framework Specialist Expertise Thinking Style and Problem Solving Specialist Expertise Analytical Thinking A command over the technical skills required within the Jobholder’s particular discipline, with particular reference to the way in which they fit into overall developments within the relevant service or policy area Conceptual Thinking The job requires me to ……….? Decision Making / Judgement • Offer specialised advice to others. • Be accepted by colleagues as “expert”. • Draw on innovations and best practice in devising solutions. Specialist Expertise Competencies List