Overview of the Major Events and Battles of the Revolutionary War Grade 7 – 8 Dr. M. Ruffini - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Overview of the Major Events and Battles of the Revolutionary War Grade 7 – 8 Dr. M. Ruffini

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  1. Overview of the Major Events and Battles of the Revolutionary WarGrade 7 – 8Dr. M. Ruffini Objectives Slide Program

  2. Slide 1- Home Slide Slide 2 – Objectives Slide 3 – Paul Revere’s Ride Slide 4 – Battle of Concord and Lexington Slide 5 – Americans Capture Fort Ticonderoga Slide 6 – Battle of Bunker Hill Slide 7 – Colonies in Rebellion Slide 8 – Americans Attack Canada Slide 9 – U.S. Navy Created Slide 10 - “Common Sense” Slide 11- Siege of Boston Slide 12 – Declaration of Independence Slide 13 – Battle of New York Slide 14 – Battle of Valcour Slide 15 – Washington Retreats Slide 16 - Battle of Trenton Slide 17 – Battle of Princeton Slide 18 – Battle of Brandywine Slide 19 – Battle of German Town Slide 20 - Battle of Bennington Slide 21 – Battle of Saratoga Slide 22 – Valley Forge Slide 23 – Treaty of Amity and Commerce Slide 24 – Battle of Monmouth Slide 25 - Massacre at Wyoming Slide 26 - Siege of Charleston Slide 27 – Battle of Camden Slide 28 – Arnold Traitor Slide 29 – Battle of Cowpens Slide 30 – Articles of Confederation Slide 31 – Battle of Yorktown Slide 32 – Treaty of Paris Slide Program Menu

  3. Objectives Events: Paul Revere’s Ride Americans Capture Fort Ticonderoga Colonies in Rebellion Americans Attack Canada U.S. Navy Created “Common Sense” Declaration of Independence Washington Retreats Treaty of Amity and Commerce Arnold Traitor Articles of Confederation Treaty of Paris Battles: Battle of Concord and Lexington Battle of Bunker Hill Siege of Boston Battle of New York Battle of Valcour Battle of Trenton Battle of Princeton Battle of Brandywine Battle of German Town Battle of Bennington Battle of Saratoga Valley Forge Battle of Monmouth Massacre at Wyoming Siege of Charleston Battle of Camden Battle of Cowpens Battle of Yorktown Objectives • Name and discuss the major events of the revolutionary war. • Name and discuss the famous battles of the revolutionary war. Slide Program

  4. Click on Picture to Access Web Site Paul Revere’s Ride Paul Revere Warns: "The British Are Coming" 1775 The British planned a surprise attack on Lexington; a storage place for colonial arms. Paul Revere overheard these British plans. On April 18th, Revere road out in the middle of the night to warn colonial militia of the approaching British. Slide Program

  5. Click on Picture to Access Web Site Battle of Concord and Lexington Forewarned by Paul Revere, American militiamen fought 800 British troops on April 19th, 1775. The battle broke out at Concord. Seventy-three British soldiers were killed and over 200 were wounded. The Americans lost 49 soldiers and suffered 39 wounded. This marked the beginning to Revolutionary War. Slide Program

  6. Click on Picture to Access Web Site Americans Capture Fort Ticonderoga American forces under Benedict Arnold and Ethan Allen captured the British fort of Ticonderoga. The fort was captured without firing a shot. The capture was the first offensive action by the colonists, and the cannons captured there were invaluable. Slide Program

  7. Click on Picture to Access Web Site Battle of Bunker Hill The Americans occupied Bunker Hill overlooking Boston on the evening of June 16th. The British, commanded by General Gage, had no choice but to attack the Americans. On the afternoon of the 17th, Gage's forces attacked. In a hard fought battle, the American were forced to withdraw. While the British were victorious, they suffered heavy losses. Slide Program

  8. Click on Picture to Access Web Site King George Declares Colonies in Rebellion On April 23, 1775 King George III of Great Britain declared, "The colonies are in open and avowed rebellion. The die is now cast. The colonies must either submit or triumph." Slide Program

  9. Click on Picture to Access Web Site Americans Attack Canada 1775 In September 1775 Arnold set off with an American force to capture Quebec. It was not until December 31 that Arnold's troops were ready to attack. The attack failed and the Americans were repulsed after suffering heavy losses. Slide Program

  10. Click on Picture to Access Web Site U.S. Navy Created in 1775 On November 28, the Continental Congress authorized the establishment of the American Navy. Although the Navy was to play only a minor role in the war, the success of American privateers in interrupting British trade was an important factor aiding the patriot cause. Slide Program

  11. Click on Picture to Access Web Site Thomas Paine Writes “Common Sense” 1775 "Common Sense," published in January, argued that the time had come to sever colonial ties with England; and that it was in the American interest to do so. This pamphlet sold 120,000 copies in the first three months and was instrumental in convincing many colonists that the time had come for Independence. Slide Program

  12. Click on Picture to Access Web Site Siege of Boston 1775 After the Battle of Bunker Hill the British remained in Boston, surrounded by an ever growing number of Continental soldiers. Finally, after the Americans who were now commanded by General Washington occupied Dorchester Heights, the British were forced to withdraw from Boston. Slide Program

  13. Click on Picture to Access Web Site Declaration of Independence July 4, 1776 Twelve colonies voted in favor of the Declaration of Independence. New York abstained. This Declaration stated that the colonies were free and independent states, absolved of all allegiance to England. It made official what had already been happening; as the War of Independence was in full swing. Slide Program

  14. Click on Picture to Access Web Site Battle of New York 1776 In 1776, the British set forth to subdue the colonies. They began the effort by recapturing New York. First, they drove Washington off Long Island; then, from lower Harlem. After this initiative, Washington retreated to White Plains, where for the first time, he was able to hold off the British forces. The British, then again, outmaneuvered Washington. Washington was forced to retreat to New Jersey. Slide Program

  15. Click on Picture to Access Web Site Battle of Valcour In the fall of 1776, Sir Guy Carleton led a large force of British ships and moved down Lake Champlain. To oppose them, American General Arnold had assembled a small force of ships. Arnold's spirited defense against overwhelming odds held back the British long enough to convince Carleton to withdraw for the winter once he had arrived at Fort Ticonderoga. Slide Program

  16. Click on Picture to Access Web Site Captured- Washington Retreats Through N.J 1776 The British captured Fort Washington on Northern Manhattan Island on November 16, 1776, without much difficulty. Washington proceeded into New Jersey. He was pursued by Howe all the way south until he successfully crossed the Delaware River. Slide Program

  17. Click on Picture to Access Web Site Battle of Trenton On December 26th, Washington's Army crossed the Delaware and surprised the British at Trenton. The main attack was made by 2,400 troops under Washington on the Hessian Garrison. Washington's troops achieved total surprise and defeated the British forces. The American victory was the first of the war, and helped to restore American morale. Slide Program

  18. Click on Picture to Access Web Site Battle of Princeton Howe sent troops south to take on Washington in Trenton. The American troops sidestepped the British forces in Trenton, instead battling them in Princeton. The Battle of Princeton fought on Jan 3, 1776was won by the Americans at the last moment, forcing the British to withdraw to New Brunswick. Slide Program

  19. Click on Picture to Access Web Site Battle of Brandywine 1777 At the end of August, General Howe brought his army south by sea, threatening Philadelphia. On September 10th, Howe's forces attacked the American troops blocking his way to Philadelphia at Brandywine. In a day long battle, the British vanquished the American forces. The Americans, however, were able to extract their army. Slide Program

  20. Click on Picture to Access Web Site Battle of Germantown 1777 After Howe had occupied Philadelphia, Washington attacked British troops at Germantown. The Americans planned a four pronged attack. The morning was foggy, and American coordination broke down. As a result, the attack failed, and the American troops were forced to withdraw. Slide Program

  21. Click on Picture to Access Web Site Battle of Bennington 1777 The British suffered a major defeat when New England militia men ambushed a large force of British soldiers attempting to forage for supplies. The British force was almost wiped out, losing 207 dead and 700 captured. Slide Program

  22. Click on Picture to Access Web Site Battle of Saratoga Burgoyne felt he had no option but to press on to Albany. The American army, however, was blocking his way at Bemis Heights. The British made two attempts to break through American defenses, but failed. After the second attempt, they withdrew to Saratoga, where they were surrounded by American troops. The British had no choice but to surrender which they did on October 13, 1777. One quarter of the British forces in North America thus surrendered, and, while many battles were yet to be fought, American Independence was assured. Slide Program

  23. Click on Picture to Access Web Site Valley Forge-Winter 1777-1778 With the British Army secure in Philadelphia, the American army settled into winter quarters at Valley Forge. It was a winter of hardship and suffering for the troops. It was also a winter of training, in which the American troops were taught how to be professional soldiers. Slide Program

  24. Click on Picture to Access Web Site Treaty of Amity and Commerce - 1778 After the American victory at Saratoga, the French were ready to enter into an agreement with the Americans. On January 7, 1778, the French royal council declared unanimously in favor of a treaty of amity and commerce with the United States. It was followed on February 6th with a treaty of alliance. Slide Program

  25. Click on Picture to Access Web Site Battle of Monmouth Biggest battle during the American Revolution. Washington attacks Clinton's rearguard at Monmouth courthouse.Uses Wellington's Victory system modified for American Revolution era. No cavalry charges and complications here. Main aspects of rules include unit facing, morale modified by casualties received, command control and fatigue due to the hot temperatures during the battle. Victory is determined by killing enemy strength points and capturing the 4 crossroads in the battle area. Slide Program

  26. Click on Picture to Access Web Site Massacre at Wyoming 1778 At the end of June 1778, a group of 900 Tories and Native Americans struck the Wyoming Valley of Pennsylvania. A small force of militia and 60 regulars under the command of Colonel Zebulon Butler attacked the attackers and was butchered. All of those not killed on the battlefield were later tortured to death. Slide Program

  27. Click on Picture to Access Web Site Siege of Charleston 1779- 1780 The British began a southern strategy by beginning a siege of Charleston. The siege lasted until May 9th when British artillery fire was close enough to set the town on fire and force a surrender. Slide Program

  28. Click on Picture to Access Web Site Battle of Camden 17791780 In July 1780, Horatio Gates was at Camden, commanding a force of 1,400 Continentals. He was soon joined by patriot troops from Virginia and North Carolina. General Cornwalis was also in Camden, with an army of 3,000. Gates and Cornwalis soon found themselves facing each other across a field. The two sides advanced on each other, with the British regulars opposite the Carolina militia men. After a few minutes, the Carolina line gave way. This led to a general crumbling of the American lines, and the American army was soon in complete retreat. Slide Program

  29. Click on Picture to Access Web Site Arnold Traitor In an act that has made his name synonymous with treason in American history, General Benedict Arnold conspired to turn his command of West Point over to the British. In return, he was to receive money and become a general in the British army. His treason was discovered when Major Andre, his British contact, was captured. Andre, seen here, was reluctantly hung as a spy. Slide Program

  30. Click on Picture to Access Web Site Battle of Cowpens American General Morgan defeated a British force of regulars under the command of Colonel Tarleton. Morgan's troops enveloped the British in a classic military action that captured all of the British forces. Slide Program

  31. Click on Picture to Access Web Site Articles of Confederation Ratified With the approval of Maryland, the Articles of Confederation took effect. The Articles stated that there was a perpetual union between the states, while individual states remained sovereign. The states retained every right not given to the central government. It took four years before the Articles of Confederation were approved. They were then approved. They were superseded by the Constitution; ratified in 1788. Slide Program

  32. Click on Picture to Access Web Site Battle of Yorktown General Cornwalis arrived in Petersburg in May of 1781. After receiving conflicting instructions, Cornwalis went to Yorktown and began preparing a naval base there. General Washington moved south and, together with French ground and naval forces, surrounded the British army, forcing its surrender and effectively ending the war. Slide Program

  33. Click on Picture to Access Web Site Treaty of Paris On September 3, 1783, a peace treaty was formally signed between Great Britain and the United States. This treaty officially ended the Revolutionary War. Slide Program