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Everyday Math

Everyday Math

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Everyday Math

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  1. Everyday Math This isn’t how we learned math!

  2. Thank you for being here and for supporting your student’s math education!

  3. Dr. Kimberly Kappler Hewittkapplerhewitt.kim@oakwoodschools.org937-297-7801

  4. Objectives • Provide an overview about our district’s use of Everyday Math (EM): • How did we come to use EM? • How are our students doing in math? (What does the data say?) • What do parents need to know about EM? • What does the future hold for our use of EM? • Answer parent questions and address concerns.

  5. How did OCSD come to use EM? • Summer, 2005: • Team of OCSD teachers/admin • Similar district programs • US Dept. of Education 2004 Adoption Guide • Reviewed: • Saxon • Everyday Math • Scholastic (Marilyn Burns) • FASTT Math • Houghton Mifflin • Investigations • Harcourt • Scott Foresman • Fall, 2005: • Held parent input meetings on 10/19, 10/22, and 10/24 • Parents completed input surveys • Survey data was shared with OCSD Board of Education • 2006-2007: Implemented in K-4 • 2007-2008: Piloted in 5-6

  6. Oakwood Math DataHow are our students doing in math? What does the data say?

  7. Math Data • Ohio Achievement Assessment (OAA) • Grades 3-8 • Value Added • Grades 4-8 • Iowa Test of Basic Skills • Grades 3, 5, 7

  8. Ohio Achievement Assessment District Comparison Data (2010)

  9. Ohio Achievement Assessment District Comparison Data (2010)

  10. Oakwood Value Added (2010)

  11. Oakwood Value Added (2010)

  12. Iowa Test of Basic Skills Data (2009)

  13. Iowa Test of Basic Skills Data (2009)

  14. Iowa Test of Basic Skills Data (2009)

  15. What do parents need to know about EM? • Three key things to know about Everyday Math (EM). • The EM system: • Games • Student Resource Book (SRB) • Math Journal • Manipulatives • Mental math • Home Links/Study Links and family newsletters • EM Algorithms • Partial sums • Partial differences • Lattice method of multiplication • Partial product multiplication • Partial quotient division • Integrating technology

  16. Three Key Things about EM • Spiral curriculum • Topics/skills tend to be introduced at an earlier grade • Mastery over time • Beginning • Developing • Secure

  17. Three Key Things about EM Everyday Mathematics is written based on a “spiral” curriculum, meaning a specific concept may be taught five times in two years, giving your child many opportunities to grasp the idea when developmentally ready to do so. For example, multiplication concepts are introduced in kindergarten with skip counting, again in first grade, in second grade through building arrays, and focused on in depth in third grade. Your child has many exposures to the concepts before mastery is expected.

  18. Three Key Things about EM • Multiple methods to solve • What works best? For student? For situation/problem? • Emphasis on the language of math • More reading and writing in math • Math-specific vocabulary (e.g. quotient; product; base x height; simplify; graphs, such as stem-and-leaf, line plot, etc.)

  19. EM System • Games • Student Resource Book (SRB) • Math Journal • Manipulatives • Mental math • Home Links/Study Links and family newsletters

  20. EM Algorithms • Partial sums • Partial differences • Lattice method of multiplication • Partial product multiplication • Partial quotient division

  21. EM Computation Algorithms • Background: • Math fact fluency is imperative • Algorithm: step-by-step procedure to fulfill an objective • Societal context: • Changing role of computation algorithms • Changing role of math • Algorithms abound! (e.g.)

  22. EM Computation Algorithms • Traditional algorithms fail a significant # of students • e.g., 60% US 10-year olds & 56% of Japanese 3rd graders mastered standard subtraction “borrowing” algorithm • Overemphasis on procedure over conceptual understanding leads to “bugs” (common, difficult-to-break habits of incorrect procedures) • EM introduces algorithms that are conceptually friendlier and algorithms that capitalize on students’ “natural” approaches to problems (e.g. solving left-to-right) • “that’s just how you do it” explanation promotes math myths

  23. EM Computation Algorithms • Students learn to compute using mental math, paper and pencil, and technology • Students learn to find exact and approximate results • Students are expected to attain mastery of one or more algorithms for each operation • Students use: • Invented procedures • Alternative algorithms • US standard algorithms • Focus algorithms: • Partial-sums • Trade-first subtraction • Partial-products multiplication • Partial-quotients • Distributed (spaced) practice is emphasized (v. massed)

  24. What does the future hold for our use of EM? • June, 2010: Common Core State Standards in Math adopted by Ohio • 2014-2015: New state tests based on CCSS in Math go into effect • OCSD plan: • 2010-2011: science (K-12 full review) • 2011-2012: English/language arts (K-12 full review) • 2012-2013: math and social studies (focused review)

  25. Educators’ Perspectives on EM

  26. Questions and concerns?