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OREGON CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT Professional Growth and Evaluation August 29, 2011 PowerPoint Presentation
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OREGON CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT Professional Growth and Evaluation August 29, 2011

OREGON CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT Professional Growth and Evaluation August 29, 2011

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OREGON CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT Professional Growth and Evaluation August 29, 2011

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  1. OREGON CITY SCHOOL DISTRICTProfessional Growth and EvaluationAugust 29, 2011 Sit with your colleagues from your building

  2. Checking your MemoryGive One Get One!

  3. Goals for Building Team Training To understand how using rubrics can be a systemic approach to support professional development and a culture for learning. To know the components of the new supervision and evaluation handbook To understand teacher’s role in the process To apply learnings by designing an introduction of PGE to staff

  4. AGENDADay One/AM Rubrics and effective teaching Components of the “New” Purple Book What responsibilities do teachers have? What responsibilities do administrators have? Building Planning Time Next steps…

  5. SB 290 By summer 2013: Performance standards with multiple levels of proficiency for principals and teacher evaluations. Performance standards must be research-based. Evaluations will be informed by multiple measures of student achievement.

  6. SB 290 By summer 2013: Performance standards with multiple levels of proficiency for principals and teacher evaluations. Performance standards must be research-based. Evaluations will be informed by multiple measures of student achievement.

  7. Effective Rubrics are….. • Definitions of effective teaching • Based on research • Human Development Theories • Principles of Learning • Learning Theories and Brain Research • Research based • Using rubrics improves teacher practice and student achievement

  8. Self-assessment Goals PGP

  9. Evaluation Activities: Formative and Summative • Observations • Self-assessment • Self-directed inquiry • Reflection on practice • Collaboration • Teaching artifacts: assignments, worksheets… • Planning documents : lesson plans, curriculum units, classroom management plans… • Parent and Community Communications: newsletters, student progress reports… • Student work • Student, parent feedback • Communication logs, records

  10. Understanding Each Domain: Paired Reading • “A” and “B” each read narrative of one domain • “A” summarizes the description • “B” gives an example of what this looks like in classroom • Select next domain and reverse roles • Repeat, switching roles until all domains read • Discuss learnings and insights!

  11. Getting to Know your Rubric!! • At your table are statements. Match the statement to the appropriate domain and component. • Find your elbow partner and discuss the answers to both questions. • When partners are finished, pair up with another pair. • Compare answers and reach consensus.

  12. Levels of Performance

  13. Levels of Performance

  14. The Old and the New Purple Book OLD NEW Self-assessment SMART Goals PGPS Mini Observations with feedback Differentiated to meet teacher needs Self-reflection Written Evaluation • Goals • PGPS • Formal Observation Cycles • Written Evaluation

  15. Formative Educator Administrator Meet with educator to: Review self-assessment and PGP Conduct mini-observations (6 in pilot year) Provided feedback following mini-observations • Complete self-assessment • Write SMART goals for PGP • Collect artifacts to document growth, if appropriate • Reflect on mini-observations • Implement PGP

  16. Differentiated Supervision Cycles

  17. Practice Self Assessment Look at Domain 3. Read each component statement and level of performance. Assess your proficiency using the levels for each component. Identify components that you would like more information about!

  18. SMART GOALS What are they? Why use them? How do you write them?

  19. What Are SMART GOALS? • S pecific, strategic • M easurable • A ttainable • R esults-oriented • T ime-bound

  20. SMART Goal School Improvement Smart Goal By June of 2012, 80% of our students will demonstrate achievement of 80% of the expected learning outcomes in number and operation sense.

  21. SMART Goal Individual Professional SMART Goal By June of 2012, the sixth grade team will develop 6 common formative assessments for the math curriculum aligned with lesson plans for the district’s standards.

  22. SMART Goal: Format • Goal Statement • Related to Domains • How will this goal improve student learning? • What measurable criteria will be used to assess your goal’s success?

  23. SMART Goal: • Goal Statement: • Form a study group with five other staff members to learn about cooperative learning techniques. All five components of cooperative learning will be implemented in year 3. • Related to Domains: • Classroom Environment and Student Management • Instruction and Assessment • Professional Responsibilities and Relationships

  24. How will this goal improve student learning? • The group will research the effectiveness of cooperative learning. Student learning should improve as a consequence of using cooperative learning in social studies, language arts, and science. • What measurable criteria will be used to assess your goal’s success? • Student work completed in cooperative learning groups will be compared to previous assignments done independently. Two assignments will be assessed and compared annually.

  25. Practice Writing SMART Goals…

  26. Goal Writing Activity • Using the results of your needs assessment, design a SMART goal to address a professional growth goal • Share your goal with your 3 o’clock appointment partner.

  27. Professional Growth Plans

  28. Observations Formal Observation Cycles Mini-Observations No pre conference unless requested by admin or educator Unannounced visitation Shorter duration, usually 10-20 minutes Post conference for two minis, informal feedback for the rest • Pre-conference to discuss lesson and class • Scheduled visitation • Usually a full period or 30-45 minutes • Post Conference scheduled after each observation

  29. Summative Activities Educator Administrator Meet with educator to: Review self-reflection Summarize mini observations, observations of other professional practice, review of artifacts Assign a rating on each component in domains • Self-Reflection on growth • Share artifacts, if approp.

  30. Teaching…. cannot be considered proficient or distinguished if students are not thinking or doing the learning themselves.

  31. Deepening Understanding of one Component: How Does a Teacher Engage? • Developing a common definition of ‘engaging students’. • Why engage students? • How often should we engage students?

  32. Engagement at Proficient Level

  33. Beyond Definitions: Critical Attributes A B Each person should write down three reasons for the beginning of the Civil War. Compare your answers with your elbow partner. When you are done, I’ll call on teams to share answers. Using the strips of paper at your table, organize these to show the steps in the scientific process. • Who can tell me at least three reasons for the beginning of the Civil War? • Can I have a volunteer tell me the steps in the scientific process?

  34. Data Set A B Think about the differences between the processes of mitosis and meiosis. Be prepared to share your answer with your elbow partner. • How are you doing with the two processes of mitosis and meiosis. Everybody get it? Any questions?

  35. More Testers: • Thumbs up if you agree and thumbs down if you disagree . Be prepared to defend your answer. The US made a good decision to pull out of Vietnam. • Who can tell me how hailstones are formed? • Write down in your journal two new ideas learned today. Share one with our neighbor. As you leave, hand your reflections to me. • Think of the difference between a ligament and a muscle tissue and how the difference effects the type of treatment. (Teacher waits 10 seconds) Mark, share your answer.

  36. B What do you notice? A 1. 2. 1. 2. Who can? Everyone should write..

  37. B Engaging Students/Activities and Assignments A Discretionary One by one Mandatory/all Simultaneous

  38. An Old Chinese Proverb • Tell me and I will forget • Show me and I may remember • Involve me and I will understand

  39. Brain Matters: Teaching with the Brain in Mind!!

  40. So, engagement increases rate of learning and retention…. What does the brain research say about the frequency need for student cognitive engagement?

  41. What do you know about teaching with the Brain in Mind? • By some estimates, 99 % of all sensory information is discarded almost immediately. • The number of neurons and dendrites in our brains remains the same t/o life. • Information remains in the working memory of the brain for less than 20 seconds. • Most HS/Adults can learn from a 20 min. lecture without processing information.

  42. Rehearsed Chunking - New Content Doing Sight Sensory Memory Working (Short-term) Memory Adults: __________ Students: _________ Processing(Elaboration & Organization) Long-term Memory Sound Smell Focus (Initial Processing) Retrieval Taste Touch NOT TRANSFERRED TO NEXT STAGE AND THEREFORE FORGOTTEN

  43. Rehearsed Chunking - New Content Doing Sight Sensory Memory Novelty Intensity Movement Working (Short-term) Memory Adults: Every 10 minutes + /- 2 • Students: _________ High School : Every 7-10 minutes Middle level/Intermediate : Every 5-7 minutes Primary: Every 2 to 5 minutes Processing(Elaboration & Organization) Long-term Memory Declarative: Rote Rehearsal Elaborative Rehearsal Procedural: Discussion, patterns, Problem-solving Sound Smell Focus (Initial Processing) Meaning and Emotion Retrieval Taste Touch NOT TRANSFERRED TO NEXT STAGE AND THEREFORE FORGOTTEN

  44. Engaging Engaging Students/Activities and Assignments Not engaging Discretionary 2. One by one Long stretches of telling without processing. More than 7 minutes Mandatory/all 2. Simultaneous 3. Throughout the lesson 2-5 min. for primary 5-7 min inter./ 7- 10 hs/adult

  45. Engaging Engaging Students/Activities and Assignments Not engaging Discretionary 2. One by one Long stretches of telling without processing. More than 7 minutes Mandatory/all Simultaneous 3. Throughout the lesson 2-3 min. for primary 5-7 min inter./ 7- 10 hs/adult 4. Processing the learning Does the engagement activity focus students on the learning?

  46. Quick Review • At your table is a list of strategies that engage students. • Circle those you have used in your classroom. • Select one to share how it was used with the content. • Select one you do not know to ask your colleagues about.

  47. Teaching Strategies to Engage Students Definition: Teaching Strategies are the activities teachers use in their lessons to engage students so students will process the learning and teachers can assess for learning. Names of Strategies shared through trainings including Engaging Students (Ellis), SIOP, GLAD, and Marazano. Think-Pair-Share S-O-S Summary Jigsaw Response Cards Numbered Heads Together Task Cards Round Robin/Round Table Four Corners 3-2-1 Summary Placemat Appointment Clock/ Quadrant Partners Graffiti Gallery Walk Say and Switch Ticket out the Door Three Step Interview Bingo Concept Map 60 second power write Mind Map 10-2 Rule Bingo Frayer Model Find Someone Who RAFT Concept Attainment Give one Get one Traffic Light KWL Thumbs up/Thumbs down Write Around Whiteboards Pivot A-B Inside/Outside Circle Entry prompts Value Lines (Birthday line-up, Living Likert) The Final Word 4 A’s Draw, Tell, Listen

  48. Summary Name 3 attributes or look-fors for engaging students. Name 2 reasons for using differentiated supervision cycles. Name 1 component of mini observation