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  1. Kim Hays 4th Grade Expository Writing Unit, Report Social Studies: Colonial Times

  2. 5th Grade Georgia Writing Test • Description • Administered to grades three, five, eight, and eleven. • Assessment for grade five consists of : • an evaluation of each student response to an assigned prompt representing three genres: narrative, informational, and persuasive • Allowed approximately 120 minutes to write essays

  3. 5th Grade Georgia Writing Test • Type of Writing: • Tests narrative, informational and persuasive writing • Students will be given either an informational, persuasive, or narrative writing topic. • Students do not know which topic will be given • Must be prepared to write in informational, narrative, and persuasive genres.

  4. 5th Grade Georgia Writing Test • Analytic and Holistic Scoring • The scoring system is analytic, or more than one feature or domain of a paper is evaluated. • Each domain itself is scored holistically. • Student writing will be assessed analytically in four domains: Ideas, Organization, Style, and Conventions. Analytic scoring will provide detailed information on student writing including scale scores and performance levels.

  5. 5th Grade Georgia Writing Test • Reports • Scores are reported in various ways to show the achievement of individual students and students as a group • Reports come in the form of: • System Report • Student Report • Student Achievement Roster • Scale Score Rank Order Roster • School Report • Student Label

  6. 5th Grade Georgia Writing Test • Resources for 5th Grade Writing Test: Georgia Department of Education. (n.d.) Standards, instruction, and assessment, testing: Grade five writing assessment. Retrieved May 17, 2007, from Georgia Department of Education Web site: http://www.doe.k12.ga.us/DMGetDocument.aspx/Grade%205.doc?p=6CC6799F8C1371F6C0EEF2BA1C3472A1300BEB9F0D2B4BD71CBD45CD9F4D062E&Type=D

  7. Pre-assessment Prompt • Pre-assessments are important to find out the knowledge the students have of the writing process. • Students should be given a piece of paper with two prompts. • They should be told to write an essay using one of the two prompts • The way the student develops the essay will give the teacher valuable insight

  8. Pre-assessment Prompt 1 • Prompt #1: The World Would be a Better Place if... • If you could change one thing to make the world a better place what would it be? Think about things you would change. Think about reasons you would change them. Choose one thing to change and tell your reader several reasons why it is the most important thing to change in order to make the world a better place. Remember to use specific details to support and explain your reasons.

  9. Pre-assessment Prompt 2 • Prompt #2: Which Pet Would You Choose? • Everyone has thought about a pet that they would like to have. What pet would you really like to have? Think about reasons you would like to have this pet. Write a paper telling about the pet you would like to have most and at least three reasons why you would choose it. Remember to use specific details to support and explain your reasons. • Summit, L. (2007). Writing. Retrieved May 20, 2007, from Lee's Summit R-7 School District Web site: http://www.manatee.k12.fl.us/sites/elementary/palmasola/wexpository.htm

  10. Post-assessment prompt • Post-assessment is futile for teachers • The post-assessment helps the teacher determine how much the student learned of the writing process • Student should be given a sheet of paper with two prompts • The student should write an essay about one prompt • The pre and post assessments should be compared to determine changes

  11. Post-assessment Prompt 2 • Prompt #1: What is the Most Important Thing You Have Ever Learned? • People learn things in school and in life. What is the most important thing you have ever learned? You may have learned how to do something. Perhaps you learned a valuable lesson about how to get along with people. Think about reasons why this lesson was important to you. Use specific details to explain and support your reasons.

  12. Post-assessment Prompt 2 • Prompt #7: Which Pet Would You Choose? • Everyone has thought about a pet that they would like to have. What pet would you really like to have? Think about reasons you would like to have this pet. Remember to use specific details to support and explain your reasons. Summit, L. (2007). Writing. Retrieved May 20, 2007, from Lee's Summit R-7 School District Web site: http://www.manatee.k12.fl.us/sites/elementary/palmasola/wexpository.htm

  13. Prewriting • Grouping Options related to Teacher Instruction: • Practice instruction: whole group format. • more effective use of time • same material is learned, so each student gets same information • eliminates duplication of questions • can explain everything to the entire group.

  14. Prewriting • Grouping Options related to Teacher Instruction: • The teacher will be using the shared pen technique to fill out the group activity and will be asking questions of the group as a whole. • students will be able to actively help one another and learn from the process • individual conferences will be held with students

  15. Prewriting • Grouping options related to students’ needs: • Linguistic Needs: • Two students with delayed language skills. • Students will be grouped with peers with higher vocabularies. • Ensures that children will have help with unfamiliar words and concepts. • However, this will not affect the students during prewriting.

  16. Prewriting • Developmental Needs: • Four students in the classroom with learning disabilities. • Incorporated in the whole group activities. • Small group activities: • Partnered with the students on middle to high levels to ensure that they understand the concepts presented in the classroom. However, this will not affect students during prewriting

  17. Prewriting • One student in the classroom with orthopedic impairments. • The student has trouble with his fine motor coordination. • This student will be able to use the computer to create his prewriting project.

  18. Prewriting • Cultural Needs: • There are four students in the classroom that are bilingual. These students have trouble with subject-verb agreement. The students will be paired with higher level students. I will also be giving the students assistance during small group time. However, this will not affect the performance of the students during prewriting.

  19. Prewriting • Accommodations: • Delayed Language Skills: The students will be able to use a dictionary. The information that the students need to know will be summarized in language that the students easily understand. They will also be given extra time to complete the assignment if necessary.

  20. Prewriting • Accommodations • Learning Disabilities: During whole group instruction, the teacher should have a signal for the student when they know the answer. This will ensure that the student gets the right answer and feels comfortable with answering questions. They will be given extra time to complete the assignment if necessary.

  21. Prewriting • Accommodations • Orthopedic Impairment: The teacher will place the student with the orthopedic impairment in the class so that they are comfortable and can actively participate. The student will be able to complete his assignment using Microsoft Word on the computer. They will be given extra time to complete the assignment if necessary.

  22. Prewriting • Accommodations • Bilingual Students: The students will be able to help each other and gain help from the students they are paired with. These students will also be able to use the Spanish/English thesaurus to gain additional information. They will be given extra time to complete the assignment if necessary. The teacher will also be helping these students.

  23. Drafting • Instructional Procedures • Second step of writing process • Write without being concerned about mechanics • Take everything from graphic organizer and develop a draft • Skip every other line • Label as draft

  24. Drafting • Modeling: Teacher Material • Go over teacher model with students • Point out important information • First body paragraph comes from the first event. • Supporting details for the first event make up the rest of the paragraph • Each event should be a paragraph. • Remember to worry about developing your content and not getting stuck on tricky words or mechanics.

  25. Drafting • Practice Activity: • Write rough draft on South Carolina as a class • Use the graphic organizer created during prewriting as a class • Go through the graphic organizer with the class • Point out important information • Use the shared pen technique until the rough draft is completed.

  26. Drafting • Assessment Activity • Students create own version of draft using one of the other 13 colonies • Remind students to • Include everything from graphic organizer • Skip lines for revision • Start with introduction • Make every event into a paragraph • Conclusion that restates the main idea

  27. Drafting • Assessment: Checklist • Formatting: ____ Did I write in complete sentences? ____ Are my paragraphs organized? ____ Did I label my paper as draft? ____ Did I skip lines for revisions? ____ Did I include all of the information from my graphic organizer?

  28. Drafting • Assessment: Checklist • Introduction: ____ Did I begin with an introduction? ____ Did I add information to get the reader’s attention? ____ Did I state my three main points and the main idea of the paper in my introduction? ____ Did I include the colony name, the date the colony was founded, and whom the colony was founded by in the introduction?

  29. Drafting • Assessment: Checklist • Body: ____ Do I have a body to my draft? ____ Are each of my events discussed in their own paragraph? ____ Did each of my events include three details? ____ Did each paragraph contain a topic sentence and a concluding sentence?

  30. Drafting • Assessment: Checklist • Conclusion: ____ Did I end with a conclusion? ____ Did I summarize what I learned about the colony? ____ Did I restate my major points? ____ Did I give the reader new information to think about? ____ Did I provide closure? • Hays, K. (2007). Checklist for drafting, unpublished checklist, Valdosta State University, Valdosta, Georgia.

  31. Drafting

  32. Drafting

  33. Drafting Hays, K. (2007). Rubric for drafting, unpublished rubric, Valdosta State University, Valdosta, Georgia.

  34. Revising • Instructional Procedures • Third stage of process • Should only make revision such as: • Additions • Substitutions • Deletions • Moves • This should be done by using the appropriate proofreaders’ marks

  35. Revising • Instructional Procedures • Four Main Activities: • Reread draft • Sharing the rough draft using the writing groups • Revising the information using the feedback from the groups • Conferencing with the teacher.

  36. Revising • Modeling: Teacher material • Go over draft that teacher has prepared • Point out revisions that were made • Point out appropriate proofreaders’ marks • Tell students only to add, substitute, delete, or move content during this stage

  37. Revising • Practice Activity: • Read rough draft aloud to students • Have them listen for content to revise • Let students give compliments and suggestions • Continue until revising is completed using the shared pen technique

  38. Revising • Assessment • Have students revise the drafts they completed during the drafting process • Have them reread draft first and use proofreaders’ marks to revise content

  39. Revising • Assessment • Have students get with partner • Read report aloud, listen to the compliments offered, ask questions about your writing • Repeat process for partner • Use different colored pen to make three additions, substitutions, deletions, and moves using feedback from partner

  40. Revising • Assessment: Checklist • Stages of Revising Process: ____Did I reread through my rough draft and use the appropriate proofreader’s marks to make additions, substitutions, deletions, and moves of my own? ____Did I share my writing with a partner? ____Did I revise my writing using the feedback that was given from my partner? ____Did I have a conference with the teacher?

  41. Revising • Assessment: Checklist • Additions: ____Did I make at least three additions to my paper using the appropriate proofreader’s marks? • Substitutions: ____Did I make at least three substitutions to my paper using the appropriate proofreader’s marks?

  42. Revising • Assessment: Checklist • Deletions: ____Did I make at least three deletions to my paper using the appropriate proofreader’s marks? • Moves; ____Did I make at least three moves to my paper using the appropriate proofreader’s marks? Hays, K. (2007). Checklist for revising, unpublished checklist, Valdosta State University, Valdosta, Georgia.

  43. Revising

  44. Revising Hays, K. (2007). Rubric for revising, unpublished rubric, Valdosta State University, Valdosta, Georgia.

  45. Editing • Instructional Procedures • Fourth stage of writing process • Putting writing into final form • There are three main activities during the editing stage: • distancing yourself from the composition, • proofreading to locate your errors • correcting the errors made.

  46. Editing • Instructional Procedures • Remind students to proofread word by word and use proofreaders’ marks • Reread paper after gaining distance and correct mechanical errors • subject-predicate agreement • mechanics such as end marks • commas for series • capitalization • spelling • Homophones • sentence structure • vary the sentence structure

  47. Editing • Instructional Procedures Cont’ • Exchange paper with peer, but only write on own paper • Conference with teacher to correct additional mechanical errors

  48. Revising • Modeling: Teacher Material • Have teacher model on transparency • Look through draft and point out editing corrections that you have made • Show students the proper usage of the proofreaders’ marks • Remind students they are looking for mechanical errors

  49. Editing • Practice Activity • Edit class composition with students • Read class composition and look for errors • Touch each word lightly to make sure you are reading word by word • Reread sentences multiple times to ensure you correct all errors • Use the appropriate proofreaders’ marks to correct the errors

  50. Editing • Assessment • Make sure students have distanced themselves from the writing • Have them proofread for errors themselves • Remind students they are looking for mechanical errors