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Landmark Television Broadcasts

Landmark Television Broadcasts

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Landmark Television Broadcasts

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  1. Landmark Television Broadcasts NEWS

  2. Nixon’s “Checkers” Speech (1952) • Richard Nixon • Vice-President candidate with Eisenhower • 39-year-old Freshman Senator from California • Member of House’s Un-American Activities Committee (Communism) Aggressive Investigations • Hero of right wing of Republican party

  3. Nixon’s Trouble • Nixon was believed to take $18,000 from a group of California businessmen in exchange for “special favors” when he became Vice-President

  4. Known as “Checkers” Speech? • At end of speech, he said that they did get something- a dog- their six year old daughter named it Checkers and they were going to keep it.

  5. Result of “Checkers” Speech • Nixon was vindicated • Gave Nixon unprecedented publicity • Helped win the election • Politicians who went on television used it as a political weapon

  6. Kennedy-Nixon 1st Debate KennedyNixon • Prepared for Debate No Preparation • Tanned (California) Sick (Staph infection) • Rested before Not Rested-Campaigning • Light Make-up “Lazy Shave”-ineffective • Suit was Dark Light suit • Confident Less self-assured • Talked to camera Talked to Kennedy (JFK contrasted with background Nixon didn’t)

  7. Nixon’s Painful Lesson Image is everything “It’s not what you say, but how you look”

  8. John F Kennedy Assassination (1963) • 70 hours of uninterrupted, noncommercial television coverage in November 1963 • Kennedy’s Assassination • Johnson’s swearing-in ceremony • Kennedy’s body lying in state in Washington D.C. • Ruby killing Oswald • Kennedy’s funeral

  9. How did coverage effect television? • Due to the continuous coverage television replaced newspapers as the nation’s primary source of information

  10. Cronkite’s Vietnam (1968) • Walter Cronkite • Veteran newsman • Anchor for CBS Evening News • “The most trusted man in America”

  11. Cronkite’s Criticism • February 27, 1968 • After witnessing Tet Offensive, Cronkite blamed the government and military for misleading the public. • Fighting an unwinnable war at the expense of “American lives and dignity”

  12. Cronkite’s Advice to Johnson • Due to the military stalemate, Cronkite said the only way out is to negotiate peace. • (It will take five more years to do so)

  13. Cronkite’s Denouncement Effect • Johnson decided not to run for re-election • Cronkite and television had power to sway public opinion and/or strengthen it • Johnson said: “ If I lost Cronkite, I’ve lost middle America”

  14. Nixon and Watergate (1972-74) • June 17, 1972 • A break-in at George McGovern’s Democratic National Headquarters in the Watergate Hotel in Washington, D.C. • “Burglars” connected to Nixon • Television and Radio dramatized testimony • Nixon and his administration were seen as conniving, distrustful, profane and corrupt.

  15. Television’s Role in Watergate • All three networks covered the Watergate hearings in entirety • Magnified the crimes to the public’s eye • Publicized evidence: Oval Office tapes, Presidential aides, friends were subpoenaed • Caused the Fall of Nixon

  16. 2000 Presidential Election • The Candidates George W Bush (R) Al Gore (D) In the closest election in history, a winner wasn’t determined until Supreme Court ruled in Bush’s favor (5-4) on December 12, 2000.

  17. How the Media lost • Broadcast networks had engaged in a “collective drag race on the crowded highway of democracy.” (Independent CNN report) • Haste to be the first to report results had led them to faulty reporting. • Florida was first called as a Gore state, then a Bush state, then too close to call. • U.S. Supreme Court finally decided election.