Download
slide1 n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Connections in Online Classes “ Teaching online is an exercise in continual incremental improvements” (Dykman & Dav PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Connections in Online Classes “ Teaching online is an exercise in continual incremental improvements” (Dykman & Dav

Connections in Online Classes “ Teaching online is an exercise in continual incremental improvements” (Dykman & Dav

237 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

Connections in Online Classes “ Teaching online is an exercise in continual incremental improvements” (Dykman & Dav

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Connections in Online Classes“Teaching online is an exercise in continual incremental improvements” (Dykman & Davis, 2008, p. 162) Presentation created for a faculty flex workshop at MiraCosta College Friday, April 9 2:30 – 3:30 p.m. Presenter: Laura Paciorek Note: Some revisions were made after the presentation (in italics). Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  2. Overview: • Background information • Six types of connections • Timelines for fostering connections • Specific strategies for each type of connection • Sprinkling of research here and there throughout the presentation Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  3. First Things First: Background Information about Connections Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  4. Opening Thought: • “Learning is a very human activity” (Dunlap & Lowenthal, 2009, p. 129) Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  5. Why think about connections? • Even early in research, connections were noted as important. • Terry, 2001, stated, “an obvious positive aspect associated with the online community is the potential to improve course quality by making the virtual classroom more than a technology based correspondence course” (p. 9). • However, Terry also noted that, “the most significant problem with the online community is that course time and efforts are used on a subject that is not directly related to course content” (p. 9). Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  6. More about “time”: • Dykman and Davis (2008): “[Instructors] also need to learn to cultivate and sustain relationships with their students online, which can be a time consuming… process but which is also a critical part of online teaching effectiveness” (p. 158). • Online vs. face-to-face • Misunderstandings and unclear expectations Dykman, C., & Davis, C.. (2008). Online Education Forum: Part Two - Teaching Online Versus Teaching Conventionally. Journal of Information Systems Education, 19(2), 157-164.  Retrieved April 3, 2010, from ABI/INFORM Global. (Document ID: 1550276871). Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  7. Dykman and Davis, continued: “When there is a failure to communicate expectations and the student is not doing what the teacher intends, the situation can deteriorate without either party realizing that there is a problem until it is too late” (p. 158). • Online and face-to-face • Prevention is key = Connections Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  8. Learning Benefits Dunlap & Lowenthal, who cite Vygotsky (1978) state: • “We subscribe to the theory that learning, as a human activity, occurs within a social context, with higher cognitive processes originating from social interactions.” • Furthermore, “[Dunlap and Lowenthal] also believe that social interaction and connection has significant influence over student engagement” • (p. 130, Dunlap & Lowenthal, 2009) • http://www.patricklowenthal.com/publications/Using_Twitter_to_Enhance_Social_Presence.pdf Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  9. My Own Informal Survey • Most enlightening results = Open-ended • I interpreted results: same amount of people wanted more connections as wanted no additional connections. • Some made suggestions for how to increase connections in the course (which I will discuss later). • NOTE: I want to thank Linda Shaffer for giving me ideas about how to use surveys! Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  10. Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  11. Summary of Research • Connections are important. • Some students want connections more than others. • The amount of time connections take can be something to consider for faculty and students. Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  12. My Thoughts • Creating connections is worth the time! • Learning • Community • Finding what works well for each class is probably the most effective (i.e., don’t spend time on something that the class does not want). • Sometimes it’s something small that can make a huge difference for students. Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  13. Next: What I Do (Strategies) Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  14. Initial Thoughts • As I sat to prepare, I thought of three types of connections: • Content • Fellow classmates • Me (the instructor) • NOTE: All three of these connections are noted in research cited by Dunlap and Lowenthal (2009) including: Dunlap, Dobrovolny, & Young, 2008; Dulap, Furtak, & Tucker, 2009; and Dunlap, Sobel, & Sands, 2007. Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  15. Expanding Thoughts • My list quickly doubled: • Content • Fellow classmates • Me (the instructor) • *Course site (different from content) • *Wider campus and community • *Themselves as learners • “Perfectly good students can ‘burn out’ and be lost” (Dykman & Davis, p. 159). Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  16. Please note: In reality, we are working on all of these all the time… the focus shifts. Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  17. Course site (beginning) • I make the course available 1 week early • I email students to let them know, but do not require login until the first day. • Some colleges do not allow this due to when the courses are populated (it depends!). • This does require some upkeep in terms of seeing who is new on the roster and making sure they get the login information in a timely manner. • It’s a personal preference (not required!) • This serves as an extended “orientation” period. Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  18. Course site • Syllabus/Course Website Quiz • Common method • Allow multiple attempts • Select Menu Items (again, orienting students is the focus) • Show all left menu items • Some might say, “Coming Soon!” • Supporting vs. overwhelming students Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  19. Course site • “No stakes” and “low-stakes” activities: • Practice Turnitin.com assignment • Syllabus/course website quiz • Helps with students who have limited technology skills • I keep the technology simple at first • Before video: Screenshots • First lecture (more orientation) • Explain course site, menu items, etc… Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  20. Course site (beginning… or beyond?) • To sustain help in this area: Q&A Board Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  21. Course site(beginning… or beyond?) • Selections from the “Help! (Resources)” area. • Two main sections addressing the course site. Inside “Help! (Resources)” Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  22. Inside “Help! (Resources)” Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  23. Inside “Help! (Resources)” Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  24. Inside “Help! (Resources)” Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  25. Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  26. Inside “Help! (Resources)” Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  27. Course site(beginning… or beyond?) • Consistency: • “Following a regular module structure throughout an online course helps to establish and sustain the pace of the course and makes it easier for students to keep track of what is due and when” (Dykman & Davis, p. 158). • Same discussion board deadlines weekly • Same assignment deadlines every other week • Layout of weekly folders same week to week Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  28. Classmates (beginning, middle, end – whole course) • Dykman & Davis: • “Students sometimes feel that they are learning more from interacting with fellow students than from other aspects of an online course” (p. 160). • Set up this environment for them • Maintain the environment for them • Facilitate interactions • Probe deeper thought and discussion • Discussion board guidelines help Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  29. Classmates • Typical ways to have classmate interaction: • Content-Related Discussion board • First week: get to know each other • Photos • Later on: How was your break? (November, Spring…) • Options each week • Types of topics • Encourage respectful disagreement • Required: initial post (word count) • Required: two replies to two classmates Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  30. Classmates “Student Lounge” Discussion Board Area Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  31. Classmates • Remember the survey I discussed in the beginning? • Students wanted to have the choice of NOT sharing email addresses. • Some students wanted to share email addresses. • Created an area where students could make the choice. Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  32. Classmates • Surveys themselves create connections between classmates: • Post results about class • See how they compare/contrast with classmates Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  33. Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  34. Classmates • Online Review Sessions through Elluminate Live! • Exam study sessions • Project descriptions • Specific topics Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  35. Classmates • Meeting in person (Make a Difference Day): • YouTube Video URL: • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wQt5imErNq4 • Service Learning Program Contact: • Carol Wilkinson: cwilkinson@miracosta.edu Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  36. Me (beginning, middle, end – the whole course) • Dykman & Davis: • “Structured, regular communication is a basic principle behind teaching online. Friendliness, diligence, and empathy all play a role with students.” • (p. 160) Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  37. Me • Some of the things that connect classmates together, also connect students with me: • Discussion boards • Help boards, weekly boards, “getting to know you” boards (I reply to all “getting to know you” posts through email) • “Make a Difference Day” (or other in-person events) • Online Review Sessions • Possibly better for connecting with me than with fellow classmates Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  38. Me • Emails I receive (direct email link in course) • Google Talk Chatback Badge • Not my idea! (Thank you: Pilar Hernandez, Lisa Lane, and Jim Sullivan) • http://www.google.com/support/talk/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=86171 Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  39. Me • Emails I send(copied in “Announcements”): • Individual emails when a student submits early work (e.g., “Congrats!”) • Individual email when students miss an assignment or discussion (e.g., “Hope all’s well.”) • Individual email about discussion board content (e.g., “Here’s more detail for you.”) • Group email about discussion boards, graded items (feedback), reminders, etc… Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  40. Me • Office Hours • I ask students what they want in a survey: Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  41. Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  42. Me • “About the Professor” Area: • Staff information • Office hours • Email • Hobbies, experience, etc… • For example: • Teach preschool • Photography in documentation of children’s work Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  43. Me • Written Feedback • My most-used method • Written comments for weekly discussions • Written feedback on assignments • Grademark (Turnitin.com) makes this easy • This semester: Experimenting with Jing! • Project descriptions • Feedback (individual) • Short explanations • http://www.jingproject.com/ Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  44. http://www.screencast.com/users/CDProfLaura/folders/Jing/media/b230675b-7818-48f6-9e97-c44b15e640e7http://www.screencast.com/users/CDProfLaura/folders/Jing/media/b230675b-7818-48f6-9e97-c44b15e640e7 Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  45. Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  46. Me • Audio • Wimba: • Not my idea! (Thank you: Pilar Hernandez) • MP3 Files - Audacity • Content: Weekly Overviews Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  47. Me • Making sure I am approachable! Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  48. Content (beginning, middle, end) • Lectures – “Conversation Starters” • Ask questions • Prompt students to do an activity • Encourage deeper thought • Prepare for readings • Highlight technical aspects of reading • Give examples • Provide more information • Tie into discussion boards Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  49. Content • Videos • Also tie into discussion boards/lectures • Captioning • Transcripts • http://www.intelecomonline.net/ • MiraCosta has a login (can get from library) • Embed videos into course Please note: This presentation is being recorded.

  50. Content • Discussions • Ask questions relevant to students’ experiences • May have different opinions • May share examples from work/life • Require incorporation of course concepts • The way you do this depends on the discipline and your students Please note: This presentation is being recorded.