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Collaborating with Families: Behavior Change is a Family Affair

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  1. Collaborating with Families:Behavior Change is a Family Affair Kiki Mc Gough, Colorado Dept. of Education Shirley Swope, PEAK Parent Center January 20,2006 Inclusion Conference

  2. P B Colorado School-wide s Acknowledgements • PBS Leadership Team-Colorado Department of Education • PEAK Parent Center • George Sugai and Ann Todd-The OSEP Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports at the University of Oregon

  3. NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND • Stronger accountability for results • Increased flexibility and local control • Expandedoptions for parents • An emphasis onteaching methodsthat have been proven to work

  4. NCLB • Require schools to develop ways to get parents more involved in their child’s education and in improving schools. • Requires that states and local school districts provide information to help parents make informed educational choices for their child. • http://www.ed.gov/nclb/

  5. IDEA 2004 “The Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 will help children learn better by promoting accountability for results, enhancing parent involvement, using proven practices and materials, providing more flexibility, and reducing paperwork burdens for teachers, states and local school districts.” President George W. Bush

  6. ROSE RESPECT OTHERS SELF ENVIRONMENT

  7. :COLORADO • Geographically and culturally diverse • Urban and rural: 8 regions • Mountains and plains • Wide range of cultural, linguistic and economic needs in 200 school districts and BOCES

  8. Colorado Positive Behavior Support Initiative 2001 • Trainer of Trainers with Dr. George Sugai • Joint Initiative between Exceptional Student Services and Prevention Initiatives • Development of PBS Leadership Team

  9. Colorado Positive Behavior Support Initiative 2002 • CDE identified 2 school districts as pilot sites • 16 school sites • 3 PBS Coaches • 2 regions in Colorado: Denver and Colorado Springs

  10. State Improvement Grant 2003 • Five Year Plan to implement School-wide PBS in 80% of Colorado’s school districts • Collaboration with PEAK Parent Center with focus on parent participation

  11. Colorado Positive Behavior Support Initiative 2003 • 60 schools in 9 districts • 9 PBS Coaches • Three Colorado regions • Parent Engagement: Guiding Principle • Pilot PBS Parent Training

  12. Colorado Positive Behavior Support Initiative 2004 • 141 schools in 22 school districts • 25 PBS Coaches • Six regions of Colorado • Team training on Parent Engagement • PBS Parent Trainings in 4 regions

  13. Colorado Positive Behavior Support Initiative 2005 • 256 schools in 32 school districts • 36 PBS Coaches • Seven regions of Colorado • Team training on Parent Engagement • PBS Parent Trainings in 7 regions

  14. Families are critical players in improving the important work of schools.......… Parents are full partners in the decisions that affect their children. Partnerships work best when there is mutual respect and each partner can participate in the decision-making process. When schools view parents as partners and engage them in decision-making processes, they realize higher levels of student achievement and greater public support. DuFour & Eaker, 1998

  15. National PTA • Standard 1Communication • Standard 2Parenting Skills • Standard 3Student Learning • Standard 4Volunteering • Standard 5School Decision Making and Advocacy • Standard 6Collaborating with Community • (National PTA, 1997)

  16. Academic Systems Behavioral Systems • Intensive, Individual Interventions • Individual Students • Assessment-based • High Intensity • Intensive, Individual Interventions • Individual Students • Assessment-based • Intense, durable procedures • Targeted Group Interventions • Some students (at-risk) • High efficiency • Rapid response • Targeted Group Interventions • Some students (at-risk) • High efficiency • Rapid response • Universal Interventions • All students • Preventive, proactive • Universal Interventions • All settings, all students • Preventive, proactive Designing School-Wide Systems for Student Success 1-5% 1-5% 5-10% 5-10% 80-90% 80-90%

  17. Student School Family Community Systems Approach: Community Perspective

  18. Westgate Elementary • Respect • Responsibility • Safety

  19. RESPECT • What does respect look like at the dinner table? • How do we teach our children to demonstrate respect in the community? • How we positively recognize our children who are demonstrating respect at home? • How will we help our children who are having challenges with respectful behavior at home?

  20. RESPONSIBILITY • What does responsibility look like when our children are doing their chores? • How will we teach responsibility for homework and school materials? • What are the consequences and interventions for our children who are not using responsible behavior? • How are working as a family in this process?

  21. SAFETY • What does safety look like in the community? • How do we teach and reinforce safety in a variety of community settings? • How do we know if there are safety concerns or issues for our children and their friends?

  22. School-Wide Systems Non Classroom Setting Systems Classroom Systems Individual Student Support Systems

  23. Eight Practice of School-wide Positive Behavior Support • Administrative Leadership • Team Implementation • Define Concrete Expectations • Teach Behavior Expectations • Acknowledge and Reward Positive Behavior • Monitor and Correct Behavior • Use Data for Decision Making • Family and community engaement

  24. WHO WHAT TYPES WHEN WHERE HOW OFTEN The BIG 5 Questions

  25. PBS Colorado Pilot Site:Type of Problem Behavior

  26. PBS in the Home • Identify positive behavior support strategies to use at home • Develop predictable routines at home to support positive behavior • Practice acknowledgement of positive behaviors

  27. I wish my child wouldn’t do that !!!!! Use your behavior sheet to record behaviors that you would like to work on as you think of them.

  28. Please stop! Why are you behaving like that? • 1. The telephone • 2. Getting out the door in the morning • “NO” in the grocery store • Driving down the highway • Time to clean that room • One more story….please!

  29. The ABC’s of Behavior:What would you do? • 14 items in the grocery store • A bad day at work and now…. • A new dog in the neighborhood

  30. Functions of Behavior • Get or Obtain • attention (social) • desired item, task, or activity (tangible) • self-stimulation (automatic) • Escape or Avoid • attention, demand, or request (social) • activity, task, or item (tangible) • internal stimulation (automatic)

  31. A New Way to See Behavior • Behavior has a “Communicative Intent” • Serves a useful purpose (function) for the person of concern • ANTECEDENT: what happens before the behavior • BEHAVIOR: what the child does • CONSEQUENCE: our response/”the payoff”

  32. Functions Pos Reinf Neg Reinf

  33. The BIG FIVE QUESTIONS • WHO was involved? • WHAT was the specific behavior? • WHEN did the behavior occur? • WHERE did the behavior take place? • WHY did the behavior occur?

  34. Behavior change is a family affair • Do mom and dad respond the same way? • Grandma’s house • Back and forth (and up and down!) • Babysitter for the night out • What are the school rules? How can we provide a “match”

  35. Westgate Elementary • Respect • Responsibility • Safety

  36. RESPECT • What does respect look like at the dinner table? • How do we teach our children to demonstrate respect in the community? • How we positively recognize our children who are demonstrating respect at home? • How will we help our children who are having challenges with respectful behavior at home?

  37. RESPONSIBILITY • What does responsibility look like when our children are doing their chores? • How will we teach responsibility for homework and school materials? • What are the consequences and interventions for our children who are not using responsible behavior? • How are working as a family in this process?

  38. SAFETY • What does safety look like in the community? • How do we teach and reinforce safety in a variety of community settings? • How do we know if there are safety concerns or issues for our children and their friends?

  39. Competing Pathway Model • Process to look at the ABC’s of behavior • Answers the question: WHY the child is doing this?

  40. Competing Pathway Model • What situations “set up” behavior: tired, change in routine, visitation, babysitter • What situations :set off” this behavior: asking him to turn off the TV, time for bed, can’t have ice cream NOW • How does our behavior reinforce this “series of unfortunate events” • What is the “payoff” for this behavior

  41. Summarizing FBA results • Competing Behavior Pathway Analysis (CBA) Diagram 5. Desired behaviors 6. Natural contingencies that maintain desired behaviors 3. The function of behavior that maintains the prob behav 4. Things that may set up the triggers 2. The triggers, things that occur prior to prob behav 1. Problem behaviors 7. Alternative behaviors

  42. Remember… • Positive Behavior Support is the redesign of environments, not the redesign of individuals • Positive Behavior Support asks us to change our behavior to help our child change theirs.

  43. Identify Replacement Behavior Working Independently Whines Teacher Attention Asks for Help O’Neil et al. (1997)

  44. Select Intervention Strategies Working Independently Whines Teacher Attention Asks for Help Do assignments In small group Chunk material Into smaller Instructional units Reinforce Academic Engagement Reinforce Raising hand Or using other techniques Teach student Ways to solicit help From teacher -raising hand -walking over to teacher O’Neil et al. (1997)

  45. Identify Replacement Behavior Wants help with homework Whines Gets help/ Attention Asks for Help O’Neil et al. (1997)

  46. Select Intervention Strategies Wants help with homework - Whines – Gets help Asks for Help Do homework in Small chunks of Time Set aside calm time When you can help Reinforce Efforts to Complete work Reinforce Use of cup or timer Teach child Ways to get help From parent -green/red cup -10 minute check in with timer O’Neil et al. (1997)

  47. Improving Decision-Making Solution Problem From Problem Solving (FA) Solution (BIP) Problem To

  48. PBS Tips for Positive Behavior • 1. Remember 5:1 with positives. • 2. Set the stage for success..reward the effort. • 3. Give clear, specific directions. • 4. Stay calm. Use a calm voice. • 5. Set reasonable limits.

  49. PBS Tips for Positive Behavior • 6. Be consistent. YES means YES and NO means NO. • 7. Set the example. Actions speak louder than words. • 8. Proactively anticipate the situation. • 9. Have patience. A little goes a long way!! • 10. Have fun and enjoy the ride!