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Poetry Week 1

Poetry Week 1

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Poetry Week 1

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  1. Poetry Week 1

  2. What is it? literary work in which special intensity is given to the expression of feelings and ideas by the use of distinctive style and rhythm

  3. The EaglebyAlfred, Lord Tennyson He clasps the crag with crooked hands; Close to the sun in lonely lands, Ring'd with the azure world, he stands. The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls; He watches from his mountain walls, And like a thunderbolt he falls.

  4. Pick your own • Pick a poem from pages 636-653 or 657-672 that stands out to you • (ie. I picked “The Eagle”) • Why is it poetry? • (ie. it uses rhyme, rhythm, figurative language, and seeks to embody the eagle at the moment before it dives to attack its prey)

  5. Reading Poetry • Read it more than once • Use a dictionary • Read to hear the sounds of the words in your mind • Pay attention to what it means • Practice reading it aloud (as prose)

  6. The EaglebyAlfred, Lord Tennyson He clasps the crag with crooked hands; Close to the sun in lonely lands, Ring'd with the azure world, he stands. The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls; He watches from his mountain walls, And like a thunderbolt he falls.

  7. Understanding and Evaluating Page 641 Want to know how to analyze?

  8. Sonnet Project

  9. Sonnets • Classical poetry form • 14 lines • 10 syllables per line • Change in Rhyme scheme = change in subject matter If it is square, it is a sonnet

  10. Sonnet  by Billy Collins All we need is fourteen lines, well, thirteen now, and after this one just a dozento launch a little ship on love's storm-tossed seas, then only ten more left like rows of beans.How easily it goes unless you get Elizabethanand insist the iambic bongos must be playedand rhymes positioned at the ends of lines,one for every station of the cross.But hang on here while we make the turninto the final six where all will be resolved,where longing and heartache will find an end, where Laura will tell Petrarch to put down his pen, take off those crazy medieval tights,blowout the lights, and come at last to bed

  11. Going Old-School William Shakespeare Edmund Spencer 89 Sonnets Usual rhyme scheme a-b-a-b, b-c-b-c, c-d-c-d, e-e • 154 Sonnets • The usual rhyme scheme is end-rhymed • a-b-a-b, c-d-c-d, e-f-e-f, g-g

  12. Find a Sonnet! Analyze it! Work Time

  13. Presenting our TrailersandGoing over Midterms

  14. Do Now: Find One person you would like to work with today and tomorrow, and sit next to them.

  15. Let’s Start with the WORD (yes, diction) Childlike • Three parts: • Sound (later) • Denotation • Connotation Childish nickel peso euro doubloon

  16. The Importance of Connotation Emily Dickinson,1830-1886 There is no Frigate like a Book To take us Lands away, Nor any Coursers like a Page Of prancing Poetry –  This Traverse may the poorest take Without oppress of Toll –  How frugal is the Chariot That bears a Human soul.

  17. The Importance of Denotation Edith Sitwell You said, “This is the time of the wild spring and the mating of tigers, This is the first vintage of the heat like the budding of wild vines– The budding of emeralds and the emerald climate When flowers change into rainbows and young insects Are happy, the people have heart-strings like music Of the great suns, oh never to be quenched by darkness.”

  18. Things to Remember • Poets choose words that are meaningful and multi-dimensional • Poets seek to use as much of the word as possible (not shortening it or limiting it to one meaning)

  19. Our Task Select one poem per partner group Read it and examine the diction (word choice) Determine a meaning for the poem, and explain how that diction illuminates that meaning. Be prepared to explain your analysis in a five minute presentation tomorrow.

  20. Do Now: Using the five senses, describe Valentines day

  21. Imagery Describing sensory experience through language Sight Taste Sound Touch Smell Remember….To create a dominant impression…

  22. Showing us: Meeting at Night bYROBERT BROWNING The grey sea and the long black land; And the yellow half-moon large and low; And the startled little waves that leap In fiery ringlets from their sleep, As I gain the cove with pushing prow, And quench its speed i' the slushy sand. Then a mile of warm sea-scented beach; Three fields to cross till a farm appears; A tap at the pane, the quick sharp scratch And blue spurt of a lighted match, And a voice less loud, thro' its joys and fears, Than the two hearts beating each to each!

  23. Without telling us…. • Using concrete examples, not vague adjectives: Parting at Morning bYROBERT BROWNING Round the cape of a sudden came the sea, And the sun looked over the mountain's rim: And straight was a path of gold for him, And the need of a world of men for me.

  24. Things to Remember • Poets choose images that are meaningful • Depending on the words chosen for those images, they may be multi-dimensional

  25. Our Task Select one poem per partner group Read it and examine the imagery Determine a meaning for the poem, and explain how that imagery illuminates that meaning. Be prepared to explain your analysis in a five minute presentation tomorrow.

  26. Sonnet Presentations!