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Narrator and Voice

Narrator and Voice

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Narrator and Voice

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  1. Narrator and Voice Feature Menu • The Narrator • Omniscient Point of View • First-Person Point of View • Third-Person-Limited Point of View • Tone • Voice • Practice

  2. The Narrator When you read a story, the narrator—the person telling the story—controls everything you know about the characters and events.

  3. The Narrator A writer’s choice of a narrator determines the point of view of the story—the vantage point from which the story is told. The three main points of view are • omniscient • first person • third person limited [End of Section]

  4. Omniscient Point of View When the omniscient point of view is used, the narrator • is not a character in the story • knows all • can tell us everything about every character

  5. Omniscient Point of View How can youtell this is an omniscient narrator? Quick Check One day a young woman looked out her apartment window and saw a man playing a saxophone. “Cool,” she thought as she swayed to his tune. A big brown dog joined the man and howled along with the music. Then a man in pajamas yelled from another window, complaining that the noise woke him up and he was going to call the police. This man, who worked the night shift and had to sleep all day, liked cats better than dogs anyway. The young saxophonist left. [End of Section]

  6. First-Person Point of View A first-person narrator • is a character in the story • uses first-person pronouns such as I and me • tells us only what he or she thinks and experiences A first-person narrator is sometimes called a persona.

  7. First-Person Point of View Always question whether a first-person narrator is credible, or can be trusted. An unreliable narrator is biased and does not (or cannot) tell the truth.

  8. First-Person Point of View How can youtell this is a first-person narrator? Quick Check Oh, man! Just as I was finally dozing off, he starts playing that stupid saxophone. I’ve already been fired from one job because I fell asleep on the night shift. Now it’s going to happen again. I don’t know which sounds worse, that tone-deaf saxophonist or that yowling dog. I’m going to call the police. Do you think this narrator’s opinion of the music is reliable? Why or why not? [End of Section]

  9. Third-Person-Limited Point of View When the third-person-limited point of view is used, the narrator • gives one character’s thoughts and reactions • uses third-person pronouns (he,she, they) • tells little about other characters

  10. Third-Person-Limited Point of View How can you tell this is a third-person-limited narrator? Quick Check He found a good spot in front of Park View Apartments and started playing soulfully on his sax. He wanted an audience and needed money. After one song, he spotted a cute girl at a window, applauding madly. A dog howled with the music, but the sax player let him stay, hoping the dog might attract some donations. Then he heard a man yelling about calling the police—clearly not a music lover. What is this narrator’s reaction to the dog? to the yelling man? [End of Section]

  11. gloomy humorous suspenseful Tone Tone is the attitude a speaker or writer takes toward a subject, character, or audience. A story’s tone can be [End of Section]

  12. Voice Voice is the writer’s distinctive use of language and his or her overall style. • The writer’s tone and choice of words (diction) help create the voice. In fiction, narrators can also be said to have a voice. • A narrator’s voice can affect our view of characters and events.

  13. Voice Notice how a distinctive voice can influence our views of certain characters. • What impression do you get of the saxophone player? Which words contribute to this effect? Oh, man! Just as I was finally dozing off, he starts playing that stupid saxophone. I’ve already been fired from one job because I fell asleep on the night shift. Now it’s going to happen again. I don’t know which sounds worse, that tone-deaf saxophonist or that yowling dog. I’m going to call the police. [End of Section]

  14. Voice You, who so well know the nature of my soul, will not suppose, however, that I gave utterance to a threat. At length I would be avenged ; this was a point definitively settled - but the very definitiveness with which it was resolved, precluded the idea ofrisk. TRUE! - nervous - very, very dreadfully nervous I had been and am; but why will you say that I am mad? The disease had sharpened my senses - not destroyed - not dulled them. Above all was the sense of hearing acute. I heard all things in the heaven and in the earth. I heard many things in hell. How, then, am I mad? [End of Section]

  15. Voice It must be understood, that neither by word nor deed had I given Fortunato cause to doubt my good will. I continued, as was my wont, to smile in his face, and he did not perceive that my smile now was at the thought of his immolation. Now this is the point. You fancy me mad. Madmen know nothing. But you should have seen me. You should have seen how wisely I proceeded - with what caution - with what foresight - with what dissimulation I went to work! I was never kinder to the old man than during the whole week before I killed him. [End of Section]

  16. Practice Write a paragraph telling the saxophone story from the point of view of the young woman or the big brown dog. Use either the first-person or the third-person-limited point of view, and try to create a distinctive voice. Remember to show what the character is thinking and feeling. [End of Section]

  17. The End