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Setting in ‘Jekyll and Hyde’

Setting in ‘Jekyll and Hyde’

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Setting in ‘Jekyll and Hyde’

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  1. Setting in ‘Jekyll and Hyde’

  2. Characterisation • Setting • A Key Incident • Narrative Technique (Legal Case, Letters) • Symbolism • Atmosphere • Dialogue • Imagery • etc. Higher/Int 2 Essay Questions

  3. Settings have both a literal and a metaphorical meaning. • Time: Late Victorian – 19th Century • Place: London, Soho, streets (poorly lit), buildings (Hyde’s house, Jekyll’s laboratory). • Setting reflects the underlying themes of the novel (duality of man, mystery) • Pay particular attention to Stevenson’s use of pathetic fallacy. Setting – the backdrop of the novel.

  4. Stevenson viewed London with a degree of contempt. • Disliked the duality of its inhabitants (Edinburgh also an influence) • Two classes – Dr Jekyll / Mr Hyde. – Lawyers and Doctors Vs Maid/ Policeman – how are they portrayed? • Arguably, Stevenson is making a clear comment on human nature here in that, regardless of class, we all have inherent good and evil held within. • Jekyll’s addiction to his ‘potion’ surely suggests that even those with reputation can be corrupted. London

  5. Mr Utterson taking the officer to Hyde’s house. (p52) • ‘A great chocolate-coloured pall lowered over heaven, but the wind was continually charging and routing these embattled vapours’ • Darkness enveloped London • Pall – a dark cloud but also the cloth placed over a coffin. • Sinister atmosphere suggesting a deal of ominousness. • Mention of ‘Heaven’ suggests the divine yet through Stevenson’s word choice there is a sense of struggle and conflict permeating the text. • Warlike/ aggressive imagery • Use of Pathetic Fallacy – reflects mood. Key Quotation – The Carew Murder Case

  6. Attribution of human emotions to inanimate objects or nature (weather). • Different to personification in that it is more allusive. Personification involves more general human qualities. • Pathetic fallacy is used throughout J and H. London is made to appear twofold, commingled out of good and evil. • ‘black winter morning’ – the morning is foul in temperament, reflecting the darker side of man and the novel’s main concern. • Page 53 - ‘reinvasion of darkness’ – furious internal struggle within the novel’s very setting. Again, this reflects central concerns. It also aids atmosphere and reflects the characters of the novel. Pathetic Fallacy

  7. mystery, darkness, oppressiveness, fear, and doom • ‘here it would be dark like the back end of evening; and there would be the glow of a rich, lurid brown, like the light of some strange conflagration; and here, for a moment, the fog would be quite broken up, and a haggard shaft of daylight would glance in between the swirling wreaths.’ (page 52) • Lurid – vividly shocking to give an unpleasantly harsh effect. • Conflagration – an extensive and most destructive fire. Stevenson manipulates setting to his own ends – playing on the Gothic tradition.

  8. Here, weather seems oppressive. • Struggle between dark and light. • Haggard - dark is winning - perhaps. • Both quotations, through the choice of verbs, suggest rapid movement and struggle. Reflective of what lies within. • Choice of ‘Wreaths’ extends the funeral imagery. • Use of fog throughout novel as a motif almost seems claustrophobic and aids sense of sinister unease. Mysterious and oppressive atmosphere developed – aids tension.

  9. ‘The dismal quarter of Soho…’ • ‘mournful reinvasion of darkness’ – use of personification. • ‘Like a district of some city in a nightmare’ – link to Stevenson. Soho

  10. ‘As the cab drew up before the address indicated, the fog lifted a little and showed him a dingy street, a gin palace, a low French eating house, a shop for the retail of penny numbers and two penny salads, many ragged children huddled in doorways, and many women of many different nationalities passing out, key in hand, to have a morning glass.’ (page 53) Soho

  11. Fog reflects mystery and the unknown. Lifts as they near their goal. • Alcoholism and addiction • Cheap and of poor quality – penny numbers. • Comment on sensationalised literature of the time – link to maid at start of chapter – ‘romantically given’. • Comment on class – issues/problems of the working class. • Through his protagonist, Henry Jekyll, Stevenson suggests that all of us have, regardless of class, the ability to succumb to vice. Hyde is at home here; Jekyll has a part of himself that is as such too.

  12. Symbolism of the door – page 18 • The embattled city; London as an extended metaphor for the struggle within Jekyll – The Carew Murder Case page 52 • Use of fog as a symbol for mystery and secrecy p52-53 – foreshadowing Utterson’sdilemma concerning the letter page 61. • Pathetic fallacy used, increasing tension as we near the climax – page 38 • Jekyll’s laboratory – page 58 • Contrast between Soho and more respectable parts of the city– p 23/53 and p17/29. Quotes you should know for setting

  13. Choose a novel in which setting helps to develop your understanding of character and/or theme. Show how the writer’s use of this aids your understanding of the central concerns of the text.

  14. Use of weather • London/ Soho • The Door and the symbolism held within. • Any other ideas • REMEMBER: –EVALUATION - ANALYSIS THAT IS CLOSE TO THE TEXT AND IN DETAIL. You could mention:

  15. Timed essay on setting in J and H • Must learn quotes, be familiar with intro and synopsis. • Also, think (write) potential topic sentences for the quotes you will probably use. Also ensure that you know the context. • It is possible to revise for this (despite what you may think!) by learning statements, contexts, quotes and the analysis. Essay

  16. Symbolism of the door – page 18 • The embattled city; London as an extended metaphor for the struggle within Jekyll – The Carew Murder Case page 52 • Use of fog as a symbol for mystery and secrecy p52-53 – foreshadowing Utterson’sdilemma concerning the letter page 61. • Pathetic fallacy used, increasing tension as we near the climax – page 38 • Jekyll’s laboratory – page 58 • Contrast between Soho and more respectable parts of the city– p 23/53 and p17/29. Quotes you should know for setting

  17. Move away from the formulaic ‘The metaphor of “citadel’… • Instead, try to show more skill with language: • The dingy streets of Soho are compared directly with the metaphorical ‘citadel’ that is Cavendish Square… How to improve your mark…

  18. Robert Louis Stevenson’s ‘The Strange Case of Mr Jekyll and Mr Hyde’ is a novel… BORING Instead: • “Set amongst the sinister and unsettling streets of Victorian London, Robert Louis Stevenson’s ‘The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde’ • “A profound study of man’s inherent duality, Robert Louis Stevenson’s ‘TSCODJAMH’ is set amongst the ominously foggy streets of Victorian London. “ The opening of your essay

  19. These should be throughout your writing, possibly even in your topic sentences: • It is this part of the novel which best… • If symbolism is seen as a key technique in Gothic literature, then it is the symbol of the door which is most prominent in the novel… • This is central/ fundamental to our understanding/ important/ imperative/ vital/ critical to, etc. Your evaluative comments

  20. ‘black winter morning’ – the morning is foul in temperament, reflecting the darker side of man and the novel’s main concern. • ‘…reinvasion of darkness’ – furious internal struggle within the novel’s very setting. Reflects central concerns; aids atmosphere and reflects the characters of the novel. • Jekyll’s home described at the beginning of the novel -“certain sinister block of building.” • When Utterson returns home after visiting Jekyll - “read a menace in the flickering of the firelight on the polished cabinets.” • The moon is described as “lying on her back as though the wind had tilted her.” • Hyde describes the sky as having "constellations [that] looked down upon me.“ • Mr Utterson taking the officer to Hyde’s house. –”A great chocolate-coloured pall lowered over heaven, but the wind was continually charging and routing these embattled vapours.” Pathetic Fallacy