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The National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP): Current Progress and Future Action

Temeika L. Fairley, Epidemiologist Comprehensive Cancer Control Branch Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta, Georgia October 16, 2009. The National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP): Current Progress and Future Action.

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The National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP): Current Progress and Future Action

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  1. Temeika L. Fairley, Epidemiologist Comprehensive Cancer Control Branch Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta, Georgia October 16, 2009 The National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP): Current Progress and Future Action

  2. COMPREHENSIVE CANCER CONTROL:COMPREHENSIVE CANCER CONTROL: Definition Comprehensive Cancer Control is a collaborative process through which a community pools resources to reduce the burden of cancer that results in • Risk reduction • Early detection • Better treatment • Enhanced survivorship • Reduce Disparities

  3. COMPREHENSIVE CANCER CONTROL:It Takes Collaboration to Reduce Cancer Burden

  4. COMPREHENSIVE CANCER CONTROL:The National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program • 65 programs have been funded • 50 States • District of Columbia • 7 Tribes/Tribal Organizations • 7 U.S. Territories/Pacific Island Jurisdictions • 64 plans have been completed and released

  5. The Cancer Control Continuum

  6. COMPREHENSIVE CANCER CONTROL:The National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program Today Goals and Objectives • Nationwide, programs reported addressing a total of 2,031 plan objectives • Programs reported addressing an average (mean) of 36 plan objectives • Nationwide, programs reported implementing a total of 889 evidence-based interventions. • Programs reported implementing an average of 21 evidence-based interventions

  7. Coalitions and Partnerships 5742 organizations with diverse resources and expertise come to the “table” – partners working towards the same goals. 11437 individuals in partnerships across programs CCC coalitions success: advocacy, effecting policy change, program development and expansion to support prevention, early detection, treatment, survivorship, and end-of-life care. COMPREHENSIVE CANCER CONTROL:The National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program Today

  8. Effecting Policy Change 75% have at least one enacted policy The total number of policies submitted by all programs is 297 Total number of policies enacted =240 Total number of policies pending =20 COMPREHENSIVE CANCER CONTROL: The National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program Today

  9. Examples of CCC Coalition Accomplishments (Policy Change) Freedom to Breathe: Advocates Join Forces to Help Minnesotans Breathe Easier Texas: Advocating for Prevention and Funding of Cancer Control Efforts Tennessee: Smoking Rates Fall Due to Coalition Efforts COMPREHENSIVE CANCER CONTROL:The National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program Today

  10. COMPREHENSIVE CANCER CONTROL:The National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program Today Vermont: Prevention Activities • Strategic Priority: Prevent future cancers by reducing exposure to known risk factors • Goal: Reduce tobacco usage and exposure to second hand smoke • Objectives: • Reduce prevalence of smoking in past month among youth in grades 8-12 from 20% in 2003 to 16% by 2010. • Reduce prevalence of adult smoking from 20% in 2004 to 12% by 2010. • Increase percentage of Vermont smokers with children who prohibit smoking in their homes from 58% in 2004 to 65% in 2010.

  11. COMPREHENSIVE CANCER CONTROL:Vermont: Cancer Plan Status Report

  12. COMPREHENSIVE CANCER CONTROL:The National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program Today Utah: Early Detection Activities • Goal: Promote, increase, and optimize the appropriate utilization of quality colorectal cancer screening and follow-up services. • Objective: Increase the number of men and women 50 and older who received a Sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy in the past five years to 65% by 2010 (HP 2010 Objective) • Strategies: • Educate the public and health care providers • Continue to support public health campaigns • Pursue grants to screen uninsured and underinsured populations.

  13. COMPREHENSIVE CANCER CONTROL:Utah Cancer Plan Status Report

  14. FuturePriorities and Directions…

  15. CDC Initiatives and Projects • Communication and Training Activities • Success Story Publication • Cancer Information Channel • MIS • Guidance documents for Implementation • Evaluation Studies and Evaluation Capacity Building Efforts • Evaluation Toolkit • Cancer Plan Study • Menu of CCC Outcomes • Performance Measures

  16. CDC Initiatives and Projects (continued) • Public Health Translation Research • Across the cancer continuum and cancer sites: • Ovarian cancer treatment patterns and outcomes • Feasibility of using cancer registries and multiple data sources to track measures of quality care in colorectal and breast cancer • Cancer Survivorship Data Collection: BRFSS 2009 and 2010

  17. CDC Program Priorities/Needs • Evaluation • Resource development • Capacity building for programs • Implementation of evidence based interventions • Expand use of public health surveillance data • Risk Reduction and Early Detection • Increase prevention and screening efforts for colorectal cancer • Expand efforts around physical activity and nutrition • Continue to implement public health strategies to • address survivorship in underserved populations

  18. Thank you For more information contact: Temeika Fairley tfairley@cdc.gov

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