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jake d usenbury and brendan marecic n.
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The whooping crane

The whooping crane

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The whooping crane

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  1. Jake Dusenbury and Brendan Marecic The whooping crane

  2. Common Name- • The common name of our species is the “Whooping Crane.”

  3. Scientific name • The scientific name of our species is “Grus Americana.”

  4. The Whooping Crane resides in: • Stafford County, Bart County, Rice County and Reno County.

  5. Description- • Adult Whooping Cranes have white wings with black tips. • They have a wingspan of up to 7 feet. • They have long legs that extend past their tails during flight. • Their flocks consist of 2-7 birds.

  6. Estimated Population- • They are still getting the estimated population for the whooping crane in 2011, but the estimated population was 535 whooping cranes in 2010.

  7. Habitat- • They migrate between Texas and Canada. • They live in the grasslands of the Midwest, Texas marshes and they live in Canadian wetlands. • They breed in freshwater marshes and prairies. • They use grain fields, shallow lakes and lagoons as places to migrate to. • They nest in the ground.

  8. Food Web Standing- • The whooping crane is a type 2 consumer. • The whooping crane eats mollusks, crustaceans, berries, small reptiles and aquatic plants. • The whooping crane gets eaten by foxes, black bears, bald eagles, common ravens, golden eagles, wolverines, bob cats and grey wolves.

  9. Why It’s On the Endangered List- • The whooping crane was put on the endangered list in 1967 due to urbanization. Their habitats were destroyed to make way for human civilization.

  10. Biotic Potential- • The lifespan of the whooping crane is 22-24 years in the wild. • They have 1-3 eggs each time the breed.

  11. Recovery Plan- • The recovery plan is to protect them by building habitats and winter habitats that enhance their ability to breed so that they can reach ecological and genetic stability.