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Welcome Back! PBIS Building Implementation Cohort V – Day 3 December 4, 2015 PowerPoint Presentation
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Welcome Back! PBIS Building Implementation Cohort V – Day 3 December 4, 2015

Welcome Back! PBIS Building Implementation Cohort V – Day 3 December 4, 2015

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Welcome Back! PBIS Building Implementation Cohort V – Day 3 December 4, 2015

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  1. Welcome Back!PBIS Building ImplementationCohort V – Day 3December 4, 2015 Updates… from the World Abroad November 2015 WA- PBIS Conference– Who attended??? Washington Winter Coaches Institute (January 26, 2016 – PSESD, Renton) 2016 NorthWest PBIS Network Spring Conference (February 24 to February 26, 2016 – Red Lion Inn on the River, Portland)

  2. Professional Learning Focus December 4, 2015 (Day 3) • Setting the stage with Progress & Challenges (Reflection) • Team Action Planning • Classroom Systems • Managing Non-Compliance/Escalation Check Calendars: March 22, 2016 (Day 4)

  3. Overview of Classroom Systems Arranging for Effective Behavior and Instructional Management

  4. Purpose • To describe the implementation of a systems approach to classroom behavior and instructional management • Critical features • Steps and effective practices • Supporting teachers

  5. 0

  6. Objectives • Describe current status of classrooms (student-teacher interactions) • Focus on classroom component of PBIS – how to support teachers • Discuss several types of teacher support

  7. 0 What seems to be the problem?Or…Is there a problem with school discipline and student behavior?

  8. Let’s set some context…

  9. School Environment • Lack of discipline is viewed as one of the most serious challenges facing public schools • National Education Goals Report (1995) • U.S. Surgeon General’s Report (2002) • Teachers report that problem behavior is increasing and is a threat to effective learning • Skiba and Peterson, (2000)

  10. School Environment Discipline and behavior problems in America's public schools are serious, pervasive and are compromising student learning. • May 2004 – Allison Rizzolo

  11. Questions You are on Day 3 of the PBIS training • Have you resolved all of your behavioral issues? • Are all of your staff on board? • Does your school have the same expectations from classroom to classroom?

  12. 0

  13. School Factors Contributing to Antisocial Behavior • Reactive/punishing discipline approach • Lack of agreement about rules, expectations, and consequences • Lack of staff support • Failure to consider and accommodate individual differences • Academic failure • Roy G. Mayer

  14. Factors • Lack of understanding of students with disabilities • Lack of understanding about how a student’s disability effects their behavior • Misinterpreting students motivation for behavior

  15. Current Status:Summary of Descriptive Research (e.g., Wehby, Shores, Symmons, etc.) • Low rates of instructional interactions. • Extremely low rates of praise. • When interactions occur, most often around non-academic issues. • Most academic activities consist of independent seatwork. • Compliance to a command generally resulted in the delivery of another command • Correct academic responses by a student did not occasion teacher praise above chance levels. • Inconsistent distribution of attention.

  16. Guiding Principles • Teach and manage social behaviors directly and proactively (positively and preventively)...like teaching reading, math, physics, music, etc. • Integrate social and academic management strategies within and across curricula. • Maximize academic success to increase social behavior success.

  17. What do the experts say? Classroom Management Training

  18. Common Mistakes • Students don’t know what is expected of them • Absence of clear rules • Vaguely stated rules • Punishing students for failure to exhibit a behavior that they do not know how to do • Large increases in instructional minutes will not make up for ineffective instruction (Christenson et al., 1989; Rosenshine & Stevens, 1986)

  19. Mistakes • Talking too much and lecturing • Taking behaviors personal • Failure to model expectations • Weak consequences or not following through on consequences • Poor planning of lessons, making them too long, too short, lack of engagement

  20. So What Can We Do?

  21. Effective Strategies • Create an effective classroom • Instructional planning • Behavioral procedures

  22. PBS School Culture • Proactive Behavior Support for All • Common language • Agreements about expectations • Consistent and predictable environments • Three Tiered Model • Primary (all students, all times, all locations) • Secondary (efficient interventions for at-risk students) • Tertiary (individualized interventions for those students with the most intense problem behavior)

  23. Focus • On what we can control • On what the student needs Change • Adult behavior • The environment

  24. SWPBS Subsystems School-wide Classroom Family Non-classroom Student

  25. Tertiary, Individual Interventions • Individual Students • Assessment-based • High Intensity Tertiary, Individual Interventions • Individual Students • Assessment-based • Intense, durable procedures Secondary Group Interventions • Some students (at-risk) • High efficiency • Rapid response Secondary Group Interventions • Some students (at-risk) • High efficiency • Rapid response Primary Interventions • All students • Preventive, proactive Primary Interventions • All settings, all students • Preventive, proactive Designing School-Wide Systems for Student Success Academic Systems Behavioral Systems 1-5% 1-5% 5-10% 5-10% 80-90% 80-90%

  26. Effective classroom management means….

  27. Evidence Based Practices in Classroom Management • Maximize structure in your classroom. • Define, teach, review, monitor a small number of positively stated expectations. • Establish a continuum of strategies to acknowledge appropriate behavior. • Establish a continuum of strategies to respond to inappropriate behavior. • Actively engage students in observable ways. • (Simonsen, Fairbanks, Briesch, Myers, & Sugai, accepted)

  28. Assess Your Current Status… TEAM TIME – Use Assessment Tool (LEWIS) to identify concerns; Later you’ll this information to create the Action Plan form at end of session

  29. Basic Rule Design the structure and functions of classrooms to increase predictability and to accommodate individual and collective needs of students

  30. 0 Make a Plan What the adult will do when students: • behave appropriately • engage in minor problem behaviors, and • engage in major problem behaviors? Only use strategies proven to be effective!

  31. 1. Maximize structure in your classroom. Considerations: • How many students will you have in the room at one time? • What kinds of activities will be taking place in your classroom? • Where should students be seated? • How will you regulate movement/supervise/interact? • What should my classroom look like? • Wall space, storage, lighting, etc.

  32. Physical Environment • Seating/furniture arrangement • Traffic patterns • Materials/supplies • Student areas (e.g., small group, break, time-out) • Teacher areas (e.g., desk, materials) • Problem features (e.g., unsupervisable areas, dangerous items/equipment)

  33. 2. Define, teach, review, and monitora small number of positively stated expectations.

  34. Routines • Increase predictability and consistency • Both teacher and student routines • Build into environment/prompts • Visual and Auditory cues • Consider “common” routines • Lining up • Meeting personal needs • Preparing for work • Attention Cue • Transitions between activities

  35. Teacher Routines • Planning and implementing instruction • Classroom movement (circulation) • Working with assistants, volunteers, student teachers • Communications

  36. Establishing Classroom Climate • Develop plan before school starts • Determine expectations • Teach expectations directly • Use first weeks of school to establish: • Expectations and behavior/routines • “climate” (laugh, smile, accept student ideas)Kame’enui & Simmons (1990)

  37. Team Time – expand thoughts more & correlate with Lewis’ assessment • Review Classroom Physical Environment, Classroom Routines and Teacher Routines, which establish Classroom Climate. • Create initial thoughts (or more detail if team is ready) for action plan.

  38. 0 3. Establish a continuum of strategies to acknowledge appropriate behavior • Catch ‘em being good • Give 4 to 1 positives to negatives • Respond immediately • Be positive • Give information

  39. Characteristics of Effective Praise Good praise follows the “if-then” rule. • Make sure students are doing exactly what you want them to be doing • Praise them within 1 or 2 seconds after the behavior occurs • If it is an on-going behavior, praise during the behavior

  40. Characteristics of Effective Praise Effective praise: • includes student’s names • is descriptive • Simply describe what the student is doing at the time - focusing on actions • is convincing/genuine • is varied • does not interrupt the flow of instruction

  41. Reinforcement Strategies • Specific and Contingent Praise • Group Contingencies • Group celebration based on group OR individual behavior • Token Economies • Points • “Good Behavior Game” • Class Dojo • Behavior Contracts • IF you do… THEN you get

  42. 4. Establish a continuum of strategies to respond to inappropriate behavior

  43. Continuum of Possible Responses • Acknowledge students exhibiting expected behavior • Secure attention and redirect students to expected behavior • Provide choice between expected behavior and staff-managed consequence • Deliver staff-managed consequence • Deliver office-managed consequence

  44. Infrequent Errors Respond proactively to infrequent social behavior errors • Signal • State rule and expected behavior • Ask student to state/show expected behavior • Give positive feedback