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AVID Tutor Training Part II

AVID Tutor Training Part II

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AVID Tutor Training Part II

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  1. AVID Tutor Training Part II How can I improve?

  2. *Presenter Information Put your contact information here

  3. Networking Getting to know you! Introduce yourself to your table partners! • Take the attached Table Tent and make your name plates. • Put your name in the middle of both sides • On one side, write the school and district you where you tutor in the top two corners • On the other side, draw two pictures that describe something about you in the top two corners. Handout pg. 63

  4. Who is in the room? B I N G O Find the handout page at the back of the handout packet titled: Notable Autographs—Famous AVID Tutors Work the room and get the signatures of those around you who fit the descriptions! Handout pg. 61

  5. Agenda Tutor Training Part 2 • Parking Lot • Review of AVID Basics • The 10 Step Tutorial Process • Tutor Challenges and Concerns • Collaborative Learning Groups & Learning Styles • WICR and Tutorials • TRFs and Writing Questions • Tutoring in Math • Tutoring in Advanced Subjects • Reflections to Maximize Learning Experiences

  6. What is AVID? • What it is… • What it is not…

  7. AVID College Readiness System College and Workforce Ready System Components: AVID Elementary AVID Schoolwide AVID Elective AVID Post Secondary

  8. Costa’s Levels of Inquiry (Review) Evaluate Make meaningful Process information Recall Handout pg. 3

  9. Costa’s Levels (Review) • Level 1 - Input • What happened on 9/11/01? • Level 2 - Process • Why did the terrorists attack New York and D.C. instead of Chicago? • Level 3 - Output • How would our mayor have acted in comparison with the mayor of NYC if a local building was attacked? Would he have come out looking as good as Mayor Giuliani? Why or Why Not?

  10. WRITING INQUIRY Prewrite S killed Questioning ● ● Draft Socratic Seminars ● ● Respond Quickwrite /Discussion ● ● W Revise Critical Thinking Activities ● ● Edit Writing Questions ● ● Final Draft Open-Mindedness Activities ● ● I Class &Textbook Notes ● ● Learning Logs/Journals C READING COLLABORATION R SQ5R (Survey, Question, ● Group Projects ● Read, Record, Recite, Review, Reflect) Study Groups ● KWL (what I Know; ● Jigsaw Activities ● Want to Learn; Learned) Read-Arounds ● Reciprocal teaching ● Response/Edit/Revision Groups ● ● “Think-Alouds” Collaborative Activities ● Handout pg. 4

  11. Four Parts of Cornell Notes • Note Taking • Creating the format of your notes • Organizing your notes • Note Making • Reviewing and revising the content of the notes • Noting key chunks of material in the notes • Exchanging ideas and collaborating about the material Handout pgs 5-7

  12. Four Parts of Cornell Notes, cont’d • Note Interacting • Link all the learning together by writing a summary that addresses the essential question and answers the questions from the left margin • Learn from your notes by studying them! • Note Reflecting • Written feedback from a peer, tutor or teacher • Address the feedback by focusing on one area of challeng • Your reflection over an entire unit and how your notes helped you learn and retain information

  13. Use Tutorials to Strengthen Note Taking Skills Cornell Way • Cornell Note Focus Goal Activity • Use this to give students feedback on how to improve the notes to make studying and tutorials easier. Handout pg. 8

  14. Binder Checks (Review) • One of the most important tools for academic success is the student’s neat, complete and organized binder. Students must prepare and maintain the binder throughout the school year. Students should: • Add calendars, assignment sheets, and blank paper • Make sure C-Notes and handouts are complete and arranged • 3-Hole punch and place returned assignments, quizzes, and tests alongside the notes they refer to This will help students have the materials needed to complete assignments and prepare for tests all in one place.

  15. Binder Feedback • Agenda/Daily Planner/Calendar • Is homework listed for each subject? Does student have a method for checking off completed homework/assignments? • Notes • Does student have notes for each subject, including AVID? Are the notes checked for quality using a rubric or other grading system?

  16. Binder Feedback (Review) • Organization • Is the binder organized in an efficient manner, with materials in the correct order? • Neatness • Are there any loose papers? Are all papers filed behind dividers according to subject and date? • Supplies • Does the binder include the required AVID materials (dividers, pencil pouch, calendar, etc.)?

  17. Handout pg. 9

  18. The Tutorial Process Brainstorming Activity Based on your learning so far, brainstorm and/or illustrate what the ideal AVID tutor and AVID student “look like.” Think about characteristics related to AVID success (such as note-taking and participating in tutorials), as well as characteristics related to success in life. Handout pg. 10

  19. Recognizing a Successful Tutor What does the ideal tutor look like? What does the ideal AVID student look like?

  20. The 10 Step Tutorial Process • List characteristics of the four roles • Tutor • Student Presenter • Group Members • Teacher • Review Tutorial Video of Matt in the Chemistry Class

  21. Tutoring---Challenges and Concerns • Think of your biggest challenge or concern as a tutor • On C-Note paper, do a Quickwrite on your biggest challenges or concerns on the left side. • This is the question you will pursue in the Helping Trio Activity.

  22. “Helping Trios”—Part 1 • Find two people you do not know well to form your trio. Assign each member a letter, A, B, or C. • For 2 minutes, A thoroughly describes his/her challenges/concerns. B & C listen and may take notes on a separate sheet of paper but DO NOT TALK. • For 2 minutes, B & C ask probing questions while A answers. • For 2 minutes, B & C offer advice. A Listens and takes notes on the Right side of C-Note paper.

  23. “Helping Trios”—Part 2 • For 2 minutes, B thoroughly describes his/her challenges/concerns. A & C listen and may take notes on a separate sheet of paper but DO NOT TALK. • For 2 minutes, A & C ask probing questions while B answers. • For 2 minutes, A & C offer advice. B Listens and takes notes on the Right side of C-Note paper.

  24. “Helping Trios”—Part 3 • For 2 minutes, C thoroughly describes his/her challenges/concerns. A & B listen and may take notes on a separate sheet of paper but DO NOT TALK. • For 2 minutes, A & B ask probing questions while C answers. • For 2 minutes, A & B offer advice. C Listens and takes notes on the Right side of C-Note paper.

  25. Traditional vs. Collaborative • Traditional Groups • No interdependence • No individual accountability • Homogeneous • One appointed leader • Responsibility only for self • Social skills ignored • Teacher/tutor ignores group functioning • No group processing required • Collaborative Learning Groups • Positive interdependence • Individual accountability • Heterogeneous • Shared leadership • Shared responsibility for one another • Appropriate social skills address and modeled • AVID leaders observe, monitor and intervene • Groups process their effectiveness through reflection

  26. Working with Collaborative Learning Groups • Tutor’s role in the collaborative process: • Encourages respect of ideas/thinking shared • Models inquiry • Balances shared participation • Prompts use of WICR to summarize • Coaches for higher-level questions • Ensures safe environment • Communicates regularly with teachers and students about participation/interaction • Student’s role in the collaborative process: • Respects the ideas/thinking of others • Uses inquiry to gain deeper understanding • Actively participates by listening, asking/answering questions, taking C-notes • Uses WICR • Creates comfortable environment • Communicates openly with tutor/teachers about group experience Handout pg. 11

  27. Flying Solo or In a Group? Handout pg. 12

  28. Learning Styles • The AVID Brain • Auditory Learner • Visual Learner • Kinesthetic Learner • People typically have a dominant style in which they learn, but they learn in all styles. • What kind of learner are you? Handout pgs. 13-14

  29. WICR Strategies Auditory Visual Kinesthetic • List WICR strategies that work well with each style of learning Handout pg. 15

  30. WRITING INQUIRY Prewrite S killed Questioning ● ● Draft Socratic Seminars ● ● Respond Quickwrite /Discussion ● ● W Revise Critical Thinking Activities ● ● Edit Writing Questions ● ● Final Draft Open-Mindedness Activities ● ● I Class &Textbook Notes ● ● Learning Logs/Journals C READING COLLABORATION R SQ5R (Survey, Question, ● Group Projects ● Read, Record, Recite, Review, Reflect) Study Groups ● KWL (what I Know; ● Jigsaw Activities ● Want to Learn; Learned) Read-Arounds ● Reciprocal teaching ● Respond/Edit/Revise Groups ● ● “Think-Alouds” Collaborative Activities ● Handout pg. 4

  31. Analyzing how students interact… • Keeping in mind the different learning styles, observe how the student interact with each other. One way to do this is scripting. • Script a tutorial to the best of your ability. • Pull out all the questions asked. • Analyze student participation based on # of questions, kinds of questions, and authentic questions. • Make students aware of what is actually happening and collaborate together for improvement.

  32. Tutorial Request Forms • What are the key parts of the TRF? • Tutorial Questions • Questions Level Marked (Level 1,2,or 3) • Student Notes • Reflection Handout pgs. 16-17

  33. Higher Level Questions? Level One: Level Two: Level Three: Gathering/Input: It’s On the Page Remember Show Understanding Processing: It’s Between the Lines Use Understanding Examine/Create Applying/Output: It’s Off the Page Decide Supportive Evidence Handout pg. 3

  34. Challenging Problem * • Students have trouble writing Level 2 and 3 questions. • How can we help them? • Focusing on what we know… • Observing parts, pieces and how they relate to what we already know… • Wondering…

  35. Walter Pauk’s Letter Read Walter Pauk’s letter and write down 10 observations that you make while reading. 2. Share the observations at your table. Add 5 other observations that you learned from your table partners. 3. Individually write three wonderings you have after discussing the observations. Handout pgs 18-19

  36. Focused Observations and Wonderings… • From the three wonderings, write a question you have about the text or its author. • Let’s read out some of our questions! • Getting your students to “sincerely think” about what they are studying is important to this process.

  37. Inquiry Activity—Math • Your job is to guide students to self-discovery! • Inquiry is the single most powerful skill a tutor can develop. • Don’t be tempted to give the solution or do the problem for the student as you explain the steps. • A student has just asked you for help with a math problem. Come up with 2 questions you could ask the student for the following areas. • Understanding the Problem • Strategies (Figuring out what to do) • Checking the Solution • Presenting the Solution Handout pgs. 20-21

  38. Handout pg. 22

  39. Mock Tutorial #1 Mock tutorial (6-7 volunteers) Tutor Student Presenter Group Members Observers Individually write at least 2 questions that the group members or tutor might ask of the student presenter on one the following problems. (Amoeba or Work Problem) Handout pg. 23-24

  40. Mock Tutorial #1 Amoeba Problem: There are two jars of equal capacity. In the first jar there is one amoeba. In the second jar there are two amoebas. An amoeba can reproduce its self in three minutes. It takes the amoebas in the second jar three hours to fill the jar to capacity. Question: How long does it take the one amoeba in the first jar to fill it to capacity? Handout pgs. 23-24

  41. Optional Mock Tutorial Question Work Problem: One pipe can fill a pool 1.25 times faster than a second pipe. When both pipes are opened, they fill the pool in five hours. Question: How long would it take to fill the pool if only the slower pipe is used? Handout pgs. 23-24

  42. Mock Tutorial #1Debriefing Group Members: “How did the tutorial process go for you and what did it feel like to only use inquiry?” Observers: Report on the involvement of Group Members using the Tutorial Process Observation Checklist.

  43. Mock Tutorial #1Debriefing Student Presenter: “How did the tutorial process work for you and did you feel the inquiry and collaboration of the group members helped you? Observers: Report on the involvement of the Student Presenter using the Tutorial Process Observation Checklist.

  44. Mock Tutorial #1Debriefing Tutor: How were you able to facilitate questioning and interaction between the student presenter and the group? Observers: Report on the involvement of the Tutor using the Tutorial Process Observation Checklist.

  45. Tutorial Reflections • The tutorial reflection is not a summary, it is a reflection on the learning that occurred. • Allow students enough time at the end of tutorials to think about and write personal reflections. • What helps them access the knowledge that they could not do on their own. What about learning was different? • Write a reflection on the mock tutorial. What helped you access the knowledge? Handout pgs. 23-25

  46. 2 3 1 6 What do they know? Identify the Problem: Recite!! What can you tell me about it? How would you teach this to a friend? Check for Understanding: What is your question? What does ___ mean? 5 Clearly Understands What would happen if you changed __? 7 4 Key Comprehension Questions: Reflect... What have you already tried? What did you learn? What is the relationship of ___ and ___? What would happen if you changed __? More Inquiry What have we overlooked? Is there another way to look at it? How would you graphically illustrate your process? Where can you go for more information? Confused?? What questions do you still have? What would happen if you changed __? What have we overlooked? The Inquiry Process Handout pg. 26

  47. Math Tutoring • Read “What the Research Suggests” • Under each paragraph write one sentence/phrase that captures the essence of that paragraph • Discuss at tables Handout pg. 27

  48. Do’s and Don’ts Handout pg. 28 • Do… • Answer most questions with questions • Be aware of different learning styles • Check for understanding with follow-up questions • Don’t… • Accept “uh-hunhs” and head nods as proof of understanding • Allow students to work on their homework during tutorial sessions • Be afraid to say, “I don’t know.”

  49. Math—Helpful Guide In your handouts, you will find helpful tools for: • Factoring (Handout pgs. 29-33) • Fractions (Handout pgs. 34-38) • Adding/subtracting fractions • Finding a common denominator • Adding/subtracting rational expressions • Integers/Like Terms (Handout pgs. 39-44) • Adding/subtracting • Writing Expressions (Handout pgs. 45-48)