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Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals PowerPoint Presentation
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Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals

Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals

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Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals

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  1. Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals -Bonn Convention- (Bonn, 1979)

  2. Rationale of CMS Migratory species are: • Common biological resources (shared by all Ranges States) • Vulnerable (subject to different threats in different States) • All Range States have an individual and common responsibility to conserve and sustainably use especially for future generations • Conservation requires coordinated measures through cooperation across the migratory range

  3. Migratory Birdsincluding • Waterbirds • Seabirds • Grassland birds • Raptors

  4. Terrestrial Mammalsincluding • Gazelles • Elephants • Bats

  5. Marine Mammalsincluding • Seals • Dolphins / Porpoises • some large Whales

  6. Marine Turtles

  7. Fish (Sharks, Sturgeon, Giant Catfish etc.)

  8. Insects (Butterflies)

  9. Reducing the Threats to Migratory Species Globally Barriers to migration • Dams • Power lines • Fences • Wind farms By-catch mitigation • Cetaceans • Marine turtles • Albatross and Petrels Habitat loss • Conservation • Restoration Threatening processes • Desertification • Climate change

  10. Beyond Aesthetics: Linkages between Migratory Species, Ecosystems and Sustainable Development Migratory species: • Contribute to ecosystem: • Structure and function (e.g., biomass, perturbance, pollination/seed dispersal) • Provisioning services (e.g., food sources) • Regulating services (e.g., predation, pollination) • Cultural services (e.g., spiritual, recreational, educational, symbolic) • Multi-scale contributions • Socio-economic benefits –> sustainable livelihoods

  11. Biodiversity-related Conventions

  12. Operational tools of CMS: • Concerted actions, strict protection for endangered species • Co-operative Agreements to restorefavourable conservation status • Co-operative research and conservation (projects)

  13. APPENDIX I Endangered species • Strict domestic protection measures • Conservation / and restoration of critical habitat • Removal or mitigation of obstacles to migration

  14. APPENDIX II Instruments for species conservation: • Agreements / Action Plans (legally-binding) • Memoranda of Understanding / Action Plans • Action Plans (stand-alone)

  15. Selected CMS-sponsored Projects (as of 1 Feb. 2003) Slender-billed curlew Siberian crane White-headed duck Lesser white-fronted goose Grassland birds Ferruginous duck Flamingo Huelmul deer Antelopes La Plata dolphin Green turtle West African cetaceans Marine otter; Humboldt penguin Marine turtle by-catch SE Asian cetaceans Indo-Pacific turtle genetics Ruddy-headed goose

  16. GEF Project: Asian Wetlands for Siberian Cranes and other Waterbirds • Participating countries: Russian Federation, Kazakhstan, Iran, China • Initial GEF funding: $350,000 • Full project: 5 years, $10.5 million ($12 million co-financing) • Partners: CMS - ICF - UNEP

  17. AEWA: Wetlands for African-Eurasian Waterbirds • 12 demonstration sites • $12 million dollars (GEF) • Co-financing: Germany and Netherlands • Partners: AEWA and Ramsar

  18. Major CMS COP7 Outcomes • 41 new species added: App. I (21) and App. II (20) • Minimising threats: EIA, by-catch, oil pollution, electrocution risks and wind turbines • CBD/CMS Joint Work Programme adopted • Institutional MoUs with UNESCO and CITES signed • New Agreements sought for small cetaceans and sirenians • Support for America Pacific Flyway Program • Sustainable use guidelines for Leatherback turtle

  19. CMS Western Hemisphere Facts at a Glance • Membership • Latin America: 8 Parties • Caribbean: 3 Parties • [North America: 1 MoU signatory (IOSEA)] • 10 projects: past, present and future (since 1999) • US$180,275 • Marine and terrestrial mammals (e.g., surveys/conservation actions) • Terrestrial and sea birds (e.g., fishing impacts) • Marine turtles (e.g., by-catch)

  20. CMS Western Hemisphere Facts at a Glance • Latin American Regional Workshop (2001) • Future possible Agreements • Andean flamingo • Ruddy-headed goose • America Pacific flyway (water birds) (?) • Raptors (?) • Small cetaceans (?) • Bats (?) • Co-operative relationships • Inter-American Turtles Convention • Cartagena Convention

  21. CMS Strengths / Innovative features • Species and habitat-based approach / focus • Continual evolution, adaptation through Agreements • Pragmatic stance vis-à-vis non-Parties • Stable atmosphere for debate • Solid support from key countries • Strong NGO partnerships

  22. E-mail: secretariat@cms.int Web: www.cms.int For more information: CMS publications / contacts

  23. Photo credits: BIOS Photo Agency, Lincoln P. Brower, Jacques Fretey, F. Graner, F. R. Greenaway, Christine Hemer, Douglas Hykle, International Crane Foundation, Paul Vescci