SiSSYFiGHT 3000 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

sissyfight 3000 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
SiSSYFiGHT 3000 PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
SiSSYFiGHT 3000

play fullscreen
1 / 76
SiSSYFiGHT 3000
1671 Views
Download Presentation
allegra
Download Presentation

SiSSYFiGHT 3000

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. SiSSYFiGHT 3000

  2. Overview SiSSYFiGHT simulates a playground fight between little girls.

  3. Overview Each girl begins with 10 Self-Esteem chips … and the goal of the game is to reduce your opponents’ self-esteem to ZERO!

  4. Overview When there are only one or two players left with any self-esteem, they win the game!

  5. Setup Each player starts with: 1. Three “Action” cards 2. Six “Target” cards, 1 “No Target” card 3. Ten chips. Everyone should pick one of the six colors.

  6. Each Round: • Choose an “Action” and “Target” in secret. • Reveal cards simultaneously • Resolve actions • All communication must be public. • When you run out of chips, you’re out. • When one or two people are left, they win.

  7. Actions • Solo: • Target discards one chip. • Team: • If anyone else teams against this target, she discards two chips per attacking player. • Defend: • Not an attack – choose “No Target” as your target. • If no one targets you: lose one chip. • Else, lose half the chips required (round down).

  8. Coffee Break at 11:00 • Play until then • Pick a different classroom • 3001 • 3003 • 3005

  9. General Observations?

  10. What’s fun about SiSSYFiGHT? • What kinds of fun did you experience? • Can we get more specific than “fun?”

  11. What’s fun about SiSSYFiGHT? • What kinds of fun did you experience? • Can we get more specific than “fun?” • Intrigue: Negotiation, Cooperation, Betrayal • Challenge: Tactics, Problem Solving • Drama

  12. How do we get from… • Cards • Chips • Rules

  13. To… • Intrigue • Challenge • Drama • Cards • Chips • Rules

  14. What’s missing? “Rules” “Fun”

  15. The causal link… “Rules” “Behavior” “Fun” This is what sets games apart…

  16. Games As Software “Rules” “Behavior” “Fun”

  17. Games As Software “Rules” “Behavior” “Fun” Code Process Requirements

  18. Mechanics “Behavior” “Fun” Process Requirements A Design Vocabulary

  19. Mechanics Dynamics “Fun” Requirements A Design Vocabulary

  20. Mechanics Dynamics Aesthetics A Design Vocabulary

  21. Mechanics Dynamics Aesthetics The MDA Framework

  22. Definitions • Mechanics: The rules and concepts that formally specify the game-as-system. • Dynamics: The run-time behavior of the game-as-system. • Aesthetics: The desirable emotional responses evoked by the game dynamics.

  23. Mechanics Dynamics Aesthetics  Player Designer The Designer/Player Relationship 

  24. The Player’s Perspective Mechanics Dynamics Aesthetics  Player

  25. Mechanics Dynamics Aesthetics  Designer The Designer’s Perspective

  26. Understanding Aesthetics • We need to get past words like “fun” and “gameplay.” • What kinds of “fun” are there? • How will we know a particular kind of “fun” when we see it?

  27. Eight Kinds of “Fun”

  28. Eight Kinds of “Fun” Game as art object • Sensation

  29. Eight Kinds of “Fun” • Sensation • Fantasy Game as make-believe

  30. Eight Kinds of “Fun” • Sensation • Fantasy • Narrative Game as unfolding story

  31. Eight Kinds of “Fun” • Sensation • Fantasy • Narrative • Challenge Game as obstacle course

  32. Eight Kinds of “Fun” • Sensation • Fantasy • Narrative • Challenge • Fellowship Game as social framework

  33. Eight Kinds of “Fun” • Sensation • Fantasy • Narrative • Challenge • Fellowship • Discovery Game as uncharted territory

  34. Eight Kinds of “Fun” • Sensation • Fantasy • Narrative • Challenge • Fellowship • Discovery • Expression Game as soap box

  35. Eight Kinds of “Fun” • Sensation • Fantasy • Narrative • Challenge • Fellowship • Discovery • Expression • Submission Game as mindless pastime

  36. Clarifying Our Aesthetics • Charades is “fun” • Counter-Strike is “fun” • Final Fantasy is “fun”

  37. Clarifying Our Aesthetics • Charades is • Fellowship, Expression, Challenge • Counter-Strike is • Challenge, Sensation, Competition, Fantasy • Final Fantasy is • Fantasy, Narrative, Expression, Discovery, Challenge, Masochism Each game pursues multiple aesthetics. Again, there is no Game Unified Theory.

  38. Clarifying Our Goals • As designers, we can choose certain aesthetics as goals for our game design. • We need more than a one-word definition of our goals.

  39. Formulating an “Aesthetic Model” For each aesthetic goal: • Write a formal definition • List criteria for success • List modes of failure • Serves as an “aesthetic compass” • These are often reusable Some examples…

  40. Goal: Competition • Definition: A game is competitive if players are emotionally invested in defeating each other. • Success: • Players are adversaries. • Players want to win. • Failure: • A player feels that he can’t win. • A player can’t measure his progress.

  41. Goal: Pirate Fantasy • Definition: A pirate fantasy conforms to the genre conventions of pirate movies, and permits the player to engage in certain kinds of anti-social pirate behavior.

  42. Goal: Pirate Fantasy • Definition: A pirate fantasy conforms to the genre conventions of pirate movies, and permits the player to engage in certain kinds of anti-social pirate behavior. • Success: • Empowerment • Independence • Greed • Treachery • Prey upon Weak

  43. Goal: Pirate Fantasy • Definition: A pirate fantasy conforms to the genre conventions of pirate movies, and permits the player to engage in certain kinds of anti-social pirate behavior. • Success: • Empowerment • Independence • Greed • Treachery • Prey upon Weak • Failure: • Vulnerability • Compassion • Generosity

  44. Goal: Drama Definition: A game is dramatic if: • Its central conflict creates dramatic tension. • The dramatic tension builds towards a climax.

  45. Goal: Drama • Success: • A sense of uncertainty • A sense of inevitability • Tension increases towards a climax • Failure: • The conflict’s outcome is obvious (no uncertainty) • No sense of forward progress (no inevitability) • Player doesn’t care how the conflict resolves.

  46. Aesthetics of SiSSYFiGHT • Fellowship: Negotiation, Cooperation, Betrayal • Challenge: Tactics, Problem Solving • Narrative: Drama

  47. Understanding Dynamics • What about the game’s behavior can we predict before we go to playtest? • How can we explain the behavior that we observe?

  48. Formalizing Game Dynamics Input Output Rules (Player) State (Graphics/Sound) The “State Machine” Model Examples: Chess, Counter-Strike

  49. Models of Game Dynamics • Again, no Grand Unified Theory • Instead, a collection of many Dynamic Models. • Dynamics models are analytical in nature. Some examples…

  50. Chance in 36 Die roll Example: Random Variable • This is a model of 2d6: