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Day One Patrol Meeting

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  1. Day One Patrol Meeting Fred Stringer Troop Guide NE-II-130

  2. Day One Patrol Meeting Provide ground rules: • Encourage note taking • Feel free to ask questions at any time • Patrol will have their Patrol Leader’s Notebook including: • Patrol meeting agenda • Patrol dailyself-assessment tool NE-II-130 1A

  3. Agenda • Wood Badge patrol members roles and responsibilities of: • Patrol Leader • Assistant Patrol Leader • Patrol Chaplain’s Aide • Patrol Scribe • Patrol Member  • Patrol Leader Election • Appointment of Assistant Patrol Leader, Scribe and Chaplain’s Aide  • Introduction of the Daily Patrol Self-Assessment Tool  • Patrol Totem NE-II-130 2

  4. Agenda • Wood Badge patrol members roles and responsibilities of: • Patrol Leader • Assistant Patrol Leader • Patrol Chaplain’s Aide • Patrol Scribe • Patrol Member  • Patrol Leader Election • Appointment of Assistant Patrol Leader, Scribe and Chaplain’s Aide  • Introduction of the Daily Patrol Self-Assessment Tool  • Patrol Totem NE-II-130 2A

  5. Roles and Responsibilities of the Patrol Leader • Plan and conduct patrol meetings and activities • Encourage patrol members to fully participate and to achieve all they can. • Represent the group as a member of the patrol leaders’ council (PLC). • Communicate troop information to the patrol • Set a good example by living up to the Scout Oath and Law. • Practice the leadership and team skills being presented • Ensure daily patrol self-assessments are carried out in a timely, effective manner. • Provide patrol members with all the resources and information they need to succeed. • Empower the patrol to become a high-performance team. • See that the patrol is prepared for all course presentations and activities. NE-II-130 3

  6. Roles and Responsibilities of the Patrol Leader • Plan and conduct patrol meetings and activities • Encourage patrol members to fully participate and to achieve all they can. • Represent the group as a member of the patrol leaders’ council (PLC). • Communicate troop information to the patrol • Set a good example by living up to the Scout Oath and Law. • Practice the leadership and team skills being presented • Ensure daily patrol self-assessments are carried out in a timely, effective manner. • Provide patrol members with all the resources and information they need to succeed. • Empower the patrol to become a high-performance team. • See that the patrol is prepared for all course presentations and activities. NE-II-130 3A

  7. Role and Responsibilities of the Assistant Patrol Leader • Assume the responsibilities of the patrol leader whenever the patrol leader is unable to do so. • Encourage patrol members to fully participate and to achieve all they can. • Assist the patrol leader in empowering the patrol to become a high-performance team. • Set a good example by living up to the Scout Oath and Law. NE-II-130 4

  8. Role and Responsibilities of the Assistant Patrol Leader • Assume the responsibilities of the patrol leader whenever the patrol leader is unable to do so. • Encourage patrol members to fully participate and to achieve all they can. • Assist the patrol leader in empowering the patrol to become a high-performance team. • Set a good example by living up to the Scout Oath and Law. NE-II-130 4A

  9. Roles and Responsibilities of the Patrol Chaplain Aide • In concert with the chaplain aides of the other patrols and with the assistant Scoutmaster assigned to coordinate their efforts, the patrol chaplain aide will: • Learn what resources are available that can be used for religious observances during the course and make that information available to the rest of the patrol. • Develop and help present the participants’ Scouts’ Own religious service. • Assist in conducting any other religious observances that may arise during the Wood Badge course. • Set a good example by living up to the Scout Oath and Law. NE-II-130 5

  10. Roles and Responsibilities of the Patrol Chaplain Aide • In concert with the chaplain aides of the other patrols and with the assistant Scoutmaster assigned to coordinate their efforts, the patrol chaplain aide will: • Learn what resources are available that can be used for religious observances during the course and make that information available to the rest of the patrol. • Develop and help present the participants’ Scouts’ Own religious service. • Assist in conducting any other religious observances that may arise during the Wood Badge course. • Set a good example by living up to the Scout Oath and Law. NE-II-130 5A

  11. Roles and Responsibilities of the Patrol Scribe • Provide interesting and timely material about the patrol to the publisher of The Gilwell Gazette —the daily newspaper of the course. • Keep the patrols records and notes. • Set a good example by living up to the Scout Oath and Law. NE-II-130 6

  12. Roles and Responsibilities of the Patrol Scribe • Provide interesting and timely material about the patrol to the publisher of The Gilwell Gazette —the daily newspaper of the course. • Keep the patrols records and notes. • Set a good example by living up to the Scout Oath and Law. NE-II-130 6A

  13. Roles and Responsibilities of a Patrol Member For a patrol to succeed as a team, each of its members must:  • Fully participate in the Wood Badge course and achieve all he or she can. • Practice using the team development skills introduced during Wood Badge presentations. • Help his of her patrol meet its obligations to fulfill assignments including the development and presentation of the patrol project. • Set a good example by living up to the Scout Oath and Law. • HAVE FUN ! NE-II-130 7

  14. Roles and Responsibilities of a Patrol Member For a patrol to succeed as a team, each of its members must:  • Fully participate in the Wood Badge course and achieve all he or she can. • Practice using the team development skills introduced during Wood Badge presentations. • Help his of her patrol meet its obligations to fulfill assignments including the development and presentation of the patrol project. • Set a good example by living up to the Scout Oath and Law. • HAVE FUN ! NE-II-130 7A

  15. Patrol Elections • Patrol members will elect the patrol leader You could see the goal (finished woggle) • Patrol leader appoints assistant patrol leader • Assistant patrol leader becomes following day patrol leader. • Patrol determines who will hold these posts during subsequent days of the Wood Badge Course. • EACH PATROL MEMBER SHOULD HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO SERVE AT LEAST ONE DAY AS PATROL LEADER. NE-II-130 8

  16. Patrol Elections • Patrol members will elect the patrol leader You could see the goal (finished woggle) • Patrol leader appoints assistant patrol leader • Assistant patrol leader becomes following day patrol leader. • Patrol determines who will hold these posts during subsequent days of the Wood Badge Course. • EACH PATROL MEMBER SHOULD HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO SERVE AT LEAST ONE DAY AS PATROL LEADER. NE-II-130 8A

  17. Patrol Appointments • Patrol selects or appoints a chaplain aide and a scribe. Each of these positions may be held by the same person for the duration of the course.Patrol leader appoints assistant patrol leader • Due to scheduling conflicts, persons serving as chaplain aides should take their turns as patrol leaders at times other than Day Two or Day Six of the course. NE-II-130 9

  18. Patrol Appointments • Patrol selects or appoints a chaplain aide and a scribe. Each of these positions may be held by the same person for the duration of the course.Patrol leader appoints assistant patrol leader • Due to scheduling conflicts, persons serving as chaplain aides should take their turns as patrol leaders at times other than Day Two or Day Six of the course. NE-II-130 9A

  19. Daily Patrol Self Assessment • A key to effective team development is self-assessment • The self-assessment tool can be used just as effectively in other team settings, within and beyond scouting. • The Daily Patrol Self-assessment is filled out in the morning before or during breakfast. It measures the development and performance of the patrol over the preceding 24 hours. • The patrol self-assessment need not be shared with anyone outside of the patrol. • Completed Patrol Self Assessment forms should be kept in the Patrol Leader’s Notebook. NE-II-130 10

  20. Daily Patrol Self Assessment • A key to effective team development is self-assessment(show them the tool) • The self-assessment tool can be used just as effectively in other team settings, within and beyond scouting. • The Daily Patrol Self-assessment is filled out in the morning before or during breakfast. It measures the development and performance of the patrol over the preceding 24 hours. • The patrol self-assessment need not be shared with anyone outside of the patrol. • Completed Patrol Self Assessment forms should be kept in the Patrol Leader’s Notebook. NE-II-130 10A

  21. Patrol Totem • Since the earliest days of Wood Badge totems have given a unique identity to participants and their patrols. • The totem is designed by the patrol and is the logo of that team. • Totems can be incorporated into items, which become take-home mementos of their Wood Badge Experience. • Totem design must be presented to senior patrol leader for approval no later than the patrol leaders’ council meeting on Day Two. • Totems should reflect your patrol critter. • Totems can incorporate things like, members initial, course number, camp, date. • Totems can be identical or slightly modified to represent individuality, e.g. day you were a patrol leader. • Totems should be easy enough for every patrol member to draw. NE-II-130 11

  22. Patrol Totem • Since the earliest days of Wood Badge totems have given a unique identity to participants and their patrols. • The totem is designed by the patrol and is the logo of that team. • Totems can be incorporated into items, which become take-home mementos of their Wood Badge Experience. • Totem design must be presented to senior patrol leader for approval no later than the patrol leaders’ council meeting on Day Two. • Totems should reflect your patrol critter. • Totems can incorporate things like, members initial, course number, camp, date. • Totems can be identical or slightly modified to represent individuality, e.g. day you were a patrol leader. • Totems should be easy enough for every patrol member to draw. NE-II-130 11A

  23. Thank You ! NE-II-130 12