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  1. inging Worshiping God

  2. The beautiful sentiments of the lyricist combined with the swelling notes of the composer combine in a song that uplifts the heart of men. “Is anyone among you suffering? Let him pray. Is anyone cheerful? Let him sing psalms.” James 5:13

  3. All the Way, My Savior Leads Me Fanny Crosby was blind since 6 weeks of age. Years later, she considered her disability a gift from God, and penned this wonderful hymn as a testimony to the fact that with God as guide, even physical blindness is not an impediment to peace and hope.

  4. I Need Thee Every Hour This wonderful poem, that gives comfort and consolation even in the darkest hour, was written by a young housewife and mother, Annie Hawks. While doing her household tasks, she was inspired to write the words. However, she received great comfort and greater understanding of the sentiment as the words were sung at her husband’s funeral 16 years later.

  5. The Lord Bless You and Keep You The text of Numbers 6:24-26 has been set to music many times. It is a wonderful blessing, and is the text contained on the oldest extant copy of the scriptures. In Hinnom’s Valley near Jerusalem, two tiny, fragile silver scrolls were found in 1979. They dated to the 8th century B.C. Several years later, after being cleaned and carefully opened, it was revealed that they contained this text.

  6. Numbers 6:24-26 “The LORD bless you and keep you; 25 The LORD make His face shine upon you, And be gracious to you; 26 The LORD lift up His countenance upon you, And give you peace.”

  7. A Question of Authority Worship is an offering to God, and God determines what worship is acceptable, and what worship is not acceptable. (ex: Cain and Abel; John 4:23-24). We must first ask and answer the question, what kind of musical worship is acceptable to God.

  8. John 4:23-24 “But the hour is coming, and now is, when the true worshipers will worship the Father in spirit and truth; for the Father is seeking such to worship Him. 24 God is Spirit, and those who worship Him must worship in spirit and truth.”

  9. What Is Scriptural? (1) New Testament Christians sang spiritual songs • Ephesians 5:18-19 • Colossians 3:16-17 • 1 Corinthians 14:15 • Example: Acts 16:25

  10. Ephesians 5:18-19 And do not be drunk with wine, in which is dissipation; but be filled with the Spirit, 19 speaking to one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing and making melody in your heart to the Lord.

  11. Colossians 3:16-17 Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly in all wisdom, teaching and admonishing one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing with grace in your hearts to the Lord. 17 And whatever you do in word or deed, do all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through Him.

  12. 1 Corinthians 14:15 What is the conclusion then? I will pray with the spirit, and I will also pray with the understanding. I will sing with the spirit, and I will also sing with the understanding. Note: Within the context of congregational worship.

  13. Acts 16:25 But at midnight Paul and Silas were praying and singing hymns to God, and the prisoners were listening to them.

  14. What Is Scriptural? (2) There is no authority for the use of mechanical instruments of music • Silence prohibits, it does not permit • 2 Timothy 3:16-17; Col. 3:17 • Historical evidence shows that instruments in Christian worship is an innovation

  15. 2 Timothy 3:16-17 All Scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness, 17 that the man of God may be complete, thoroughly equipped for every good work.

  16. Colossians 3:17 And whatever you do in word or deed, do all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through Him. Note:“In the name of” means by the authority of the Lord Jesus

  17. Early Church History In the midst of these spiraling changes from the simplicity of the New Testament to the complexities of the doctrines and practices of medieval religious life and thought, it is important to note that the use of instrumental music in church worship was not evidenced until several centuries after the close of Scripture. The general dates of the adoption of instrumental music in worship vary with the historian, but all agree it was centuries after the New Testament was completed. A historical summary published elsewhere will provide more details (Woodson, pp. 7-10), but a few observations are in order. M.C. Kurfees cited older historians and encyclopists who dated the introduction of instrumental music in church worship from the early 600s (pp. 158-178). (William Woodson, ThD., Church Historian)

  18. Restoration History The earliest reference presently available indicated a question of the propriety of introducing instrumental music in worship arose in 1849 (p. 19). A few scattered references are found during the 1850s, but the first well documented use of the instrument was in 1859 in Midway, Kentucky, under the leadership of L.L. Pinkerton (pp. 21,22). Following the Civil War, instrumental music in worship began to be introduced first in a few, then in more and more of the churches in the restoration movement. With the introduction of the instrument also came the resistance and controversy, which its opponents readily provided. (William Woodson, ThD., Church Historian)

  19. Restoration History - Granbury Some of the students at Add-Ran [univ. 3 miles away, at Thorp, TX] wanted to use an organ in the worship at a service on February 20, 1894.  At that service, the father of the Clark brothers, J.A. Clark, presented his son, Addison, with a petition signed by J.A. Clark and more than a hundred others, asking that the organ not be used.  Addison read the petition, conferred with his brother, Randolph, then, announced that he had promised the students that the organ could be used and that he could not go back on his word.  He turned to the organist and said, “Play, on Miss Bertha.”  J.A. Clark, then 78 years old, arose with his wife and walked out of the building.  About 140 followed him out. (Dr. Don Vinzant, Historical sketch of Granbury church of Christ)

  20. John Calvin, (Presbyterian) Musical instruments in celebrating the praises of God would be no more suitable than the burning of incense, the lighting up of lamps, and the restoration of the other shadows of the law. The papists, therefore, have foolishly borrowed this, as well as many other things, from the Jews. Men who are fond of outward pomp may delight in that noise; but the simplicity which God recommends to us by the apostle is far more pleasing to Him. (Commentary, Psalm 33)

  21. John Wesley, (Methodist) I have no objection to instruments of music in our chapels provided they are neither heard nor seen. (quoted in Adam Clarke’s Commentary at Amos 6:5)

  22. Charles H. Spurgeon, (Baptist) “Praise the Lord with the harp.” Israel was at school, and used childish things to help her learn. But in these days, when Jesus gives us spiritual food, one can make melody without strings and pipes. We do not need them. They would hinder rather than help our praise. Sing unto Him! This is the sweetest and best music. No instrument is like the human voice. (The Treasury of David, Psalm 42:4)

  23. What Is Scriptural? (3) There is no authority for Choirs or singing as entertainment • The command to sing is reciprocal (as such, congregational) • Ephesians 5:18-19 • Degrades the true purpose of singing (Entertainment is sensual)

  24. Ephesians 5:18-19 And do not be drunk with wine, in which is dissipation; but be filled with the Spirit, 19speaking to one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing and making melody in your heart to the Lord.

  25. Charles H. Spurgeon, (Baptist) What a degradation to supplant the intelligent song of the whole congregation by the theatrical prettiness of a quartet, the refined niceties of a choir, or the blowing off of wind from the inanimate bellows and pipes! We might as well pray by machinery as praise by it. (The Treasury of David, Psalm 42:4)

  26. What Is Scriptural? (4) We must be careful to respect the importance of teaching in singing songs to God • Some of the modern day “praise songs” in their “vain repetitions” fail to edify • Comparison: “How Great Thou Art”, and “Our God is an Awesome God”

  27. Our God Is An Awesome God, 1 Oh, when He rolls up His sleeves He ain't just puttin' on the Ritz, / Our God is an awesome God. / There's thunder in His footsteps And lightning in His fists. / Our God is an awesome God. / And the Lord, He wasn't jokin' when He kicked 'em out of Eden, It wasn't for no reason that He shed His blood, / His return is very close And so you better be believin' that our God is an awesome God. (Rich Mullins)

  28. Our God Is An Awesome God, (Chorus) Our God is an awesome God, He reigns from Heaven above, With wisdom, pow'r and love, Our God is an awesome God. (Rich Mullins)

  29. Why Do We Sing? • To Praise the Lord Acts 16:25; Hebrews 13:15

  30. Acts 16:25 But at midnight Paul and Silas were praying and singing hymns to God, and the prisoners were listening to them.

  31. Hebrews 13:15 Therefore by Him let us continually offer the sacrifice of praise to God, that is, the fruit of our lips, giving thanks to His name.

  32. Why Do We Sing? • To Praise the Lord Acts 16:25; Hebrews 13:15 • To Teach and Admonish One Another Ephesians 5:19; Colossians 3:16

  33. Ephesians 5:18-19 And do not be drunk with wine, in which is dissipation; but be filled with the Spirit, 19speaking to one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing and making melody in your heart to the Lord.

  34. Colossians 3:16 Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly in all wisdom, teaching and admonishing one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing with grace in your hearts to the Lord.

  35. Why Do We Sing? • To Praise the Lord Acts 16:25; Hebrews 13:15 • To Teach and Admonish One Another Ephesians 5:19; Colossians 3:16 • To Be Filled and Enriched Psalm 71:23; Psalm 147:1

  36. Psalm 71:23 My lips shall greatly rejoice when I sing to You, And my soul, which You have redeemed.

  37. Psalm 147:1 Praise the LORD! For it is good to sing praises to our God; For it is pleasant, and praise is beautiful.

  38. Be reverent (Dress & Demeanor) Speak up! Sing loudly Work on tempo (faster is better) Learn to use a pitch pipe (Proper pitch is important) Sing songs you have mastered Work on mastering new songs Learn to keep the time (3 patterns) Come prepared Remember, it is not a performance Suggestions for Song Leaders

  39. Be reverent (Dress & Demeanor) Worship in Spirit Concentrate on the words of the song Recognize that worship in song is as important as any other worship. Sit at the front Raise your songbook Pay attention to the song leader Don’t drag, keep up! Sing out! You’re not as loud as you think! Suggestions for Congregation

  40. Conclusion Singing is a wonderful act of worship that praises God, blesses those who hear us, and even ourselves as we sing. Praise the LORD! Sing to the LORD a new song, And His praise in the assembly of saints. Psalm 149:1