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The Great Huge Seemingly Ever Growing Poetry Overview

The Great Huge Seemingly Ever Growing Poetry Overview

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The Great Huge Seemingly Ever Growing Poetry Overview

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  1. The Great Huge Seemingly Ever GrowingPoetry Overview Notes Slide’s information; What do I need to write down? The important stuff. By Mr. Moshé OR What You Need to Know PREVIEW THE SLIDE BEFORE YOU TAKE NOTES FROM IT.

  2. What is poetry? Poetry is [an] attempt to paint the color of the wind. — Maxwell Bodenheim, poet

  3. Poetry is… • . . . the essential use of the language. • . . . the most compact form of literature - in other words, poets express their ideas in as few words as possible. • . . . using a few carefully chosen words to express a range of emotions, tell epic stories, and reveal truths. To say so much, poets use a variety of forms, sound devices, imagery, and figurative language.

  4. Key Elements of Poetry Form and Structure, Sound, Imagery, Figurative Language

  5. The Four Key Elements of Poetry • Form/Structure —the way the poem is arranged on the page. • Sound —how the poem sounds when read aloud. • Imagery —words or phrases that appeal to the five senses. • Figurative Language —words or phrases that mean something different than the actual definitions of the words.

  6. Elements of Form and Structure • Form — how the poem looks on the page. • Free verse — a poem without a set structure. • Structure — different types of poems have different types of structures • Haiku – 3 lines with line 1 – 5 sylables, line 2 – 7 sylables, line 3 – 5 sylables, limerick, villanelle, or sonnet. • Concrete Poetry — a poem where the words are arranged into a shape. • Sonnet Poetry – 14 lines, couplet at the end

  7. Elements of Form and Structure • Speaker —the voice of the poem, like a narrator in the story. From the title, “Mother to Son,” by Langston Hughes, we can infer that the speaker is a woman, who is speaking to her son. • Stanza —a grouping of lines in a poem, like a paragraph in prose.

  8. Elements of Sound These terms are all the same idea. SYNONYMS • Rhyme - repetition of sounds. • Near, Half, Close or Imperfect Rhymes – Rhymes that share EITHER the same vowel or consonant sound BUT NOT BOTH. • House and Dose • Like and beek • abide and kite • End Rhyme - rhymes found at the ends of lines. Whose woods these are I think I know,His house is in the village, though;He will not see me stopping hereTo watch his woods fill up with snow. --Robert Frost, “Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening” Near, Half, Close or Imperfect Rhymes sound similar but not the same.

  9. Elements of Sound Internal Rhyme — A word inside a line rhymes with another word on the same line. Men swift to see done, and outrun, their extremist commanding— Of the tribe which describe with a jibe the perversions of Justice— Panders avowed to the crowd whatsoever its lust is. --Rudyard Kipling, “The City of Brass”

  10. Elements of Sound • Rhyme Scheme — the pattern of end rhyme in a poem. Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary, AOver many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore, BWhile I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping, CAs of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door. B"'Tis some visitor," I muttered, "tapping at my chamber door - BOnly this, and nothing more." BAh, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December, DAnd each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor. BEagerly I wished the morrow; - vainly I had sought to borrow EFrom my books surcease of sorrow - sorrow for the lost Lenore - BFor the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore - BNameless here for evermore. B -- from “The Raven” by Edgar Allan Poe

  11. Elements of Sound - Rhymes • Consonance— repetition of consonant sounds anywhere they occur. Rap rejects my tape deck, ejects projectile Whether jew or gentile I rank top percentile. --The Fugees, “Zealots”

  12. CONSONANCE • The repeated consonant sounds can be anywhere in the words • Similar to alliteration EXCEPT . . . • Alliterationis a special case of consonance where the repeated consonant sound is at the beginning of each word • pittpatter • silken,sad, uncertain, rustling . . • lady lounges lazily • dark deep dread crept in • Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers. • busy batters bat baseballs by bases. consonance alliteration

  13. Elements of Sound - Rhymes • Assonance— repetition of vowel sounds. I must confess that in my quest I felt depressed and restless. --Thin Lizzy, “With Love”

  14. ASSONANCE • Repeated VOWEL sounds in a line or lines of poetry. • Often creates near rhyme. • Lake Fate Base Fade • (All share the long “a” sound.)

  15. ASSONANCE cont. • Examples of ASSONANCE: • “Slow the low gradual moan came in the snowing.” • John Masefield • “Shall ever medicine thee to that sweet sleep.” • - William Shakespeare

  16. Elements of Sound Meter— the pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables in poetry. To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells. --John Keats, “Ode to Autmn”

  17. Elements of Sound Rhythm— the musical quality produced by the repetition of stressed and unstressed syllable patterns. Fátbláckbúcksĭn ă wíne-bárrĕlróom Barrel-house kings, with feet unstable, (Copy this line) Sagged and reeled and pounded on the table, Pounded on the table, Beat an empty barrel with the handle of a broom, Hard as they were able Boom, boom, BOOM, With a silk umbrella and the handle of a broom, Boomlay, boomlay, boomlay, BOOM. --Vachel Lindsay, “The Congo”

  18. What types of rhyme are here? Label them. • What syllables are STRESSED which are unstressed? Label them. Men swift to see done, and outrun, their extremist commanding— Of the tribe which describe with a jibe the perversions of Justice— Panders avowed to the crowd whatsoever its lust is. --Rudyard Kipling, “The City of Brass” Consonant Alliterate Internal Rhyme Assonant Internal Rhyme End Rhyme Assonant Internal Rhyme Assonant Internal Rhyme

  19. Figurative Language • Figurative Language is any time words are used in a way that is different from their usual dictionary definition, or literal meaning.

  20. Figurative Language • COPY THESE DOWN, and try to guess what type of figurative language each is an example of. • I’ve told you that a million times. • It cut like a hot knife through butter. • You’re skating on thin ice, pal. • America is a melting pot. • The rain kissed my cheeks. • And then, poof! He was gone.

  21. Figurative Language - IDIOMS Idiom — a figure of speech, usually slang, when language is used in a non-literal sense. • He passed the exam by the skin of his teeth. • She’s really bringing home the bacon. • The two fell in love instantly. • I’m laying down the law. In an idiom, the sum is NOT EQUAL to its parts.

  22. Idiom (A Culturally Specific Expression) • An expression where the literal meaning of the words is not the meaning of the expression. • It means something other than what it actually says. • Idioms are phrases and sentences that do not mean exactly what they say. • Even if you know the meaning of every word, you may not understand the idiom because you don't understand the culture behind it. • EXAMPLES • It’s raining cats and dogs. • Your barking up the wrong tree. • Dear John letter • He’s down in the dumps. • I’m broke! • She got cold feet. • Couch potato.

  23. Idiom What does that mean? ((Hands please)) What kinds of problems could arise from this? Important ! ! • An idiom is a figurative language technique that does not mean what is being said. • Idioms are culturally specific.

  24. Idiom Remember what literal means? This is the opposite. Think about it. When you tell your hommie “Chill!”are you suggesting s/he walk into a freezer? No.

  25. Idiom The expression “chill,” is an idiom that means: relax, take it easy or don’t worry. There are tons of idioms. I’m sure you use several all the time, without thinking about it. What figures of speech are in the passages on this page?

  26. "Chill." can be interpreted as . . . Which of these could also be considered IDIOMATIC? • Take it easy. • Stay cool. • Relax • Calm down or I'll deck you! • Please stop because you're distressing me. • Stop as in “ You wanna chill here? • Hang out as in “Yeah, let’s chill here?”

  27. Idiom Important ! ! An idiom is a speech form or an expression of a given language that is peculiar to itself grammatically or cannot be understood from the individual meanings of its elements.

  28. Idiom Idioms are known as regional speech, dialect, slang, jargon, or legal idiom.

  29. Idiom Dude! I can’t understand the idiom all by itself. It takes reference.

  30. Types of Figurative Language Idiom — a figure of speech, usually slang, when language is used in a non-literal sense. • He passed the exam by the skin of his teeth. • She’s really bringing home the bacon. • The two fell in love instantly. • I’m laying down the law.

  31. Idioms More examples of idioms: • Mommy says: “Daddy is a little pigeon toed.” • We were chewing the fat. • It’s raining cats and dogs. • She’s as sharp as a tack. • I wish he would kick the bucket.

  32. Types of Figurative Language Simile — a comparison of two different things using “like” or “as”. Similar – get it. • She was as big as a house. • His eyes were round as saucers. • The fog was so thick, it was like driving through soup.

  33. Types of Figurative Language Simile — a comparison of two seemingly different things using “like”, “as” and other comparative language structures. Similes tell us that two things are Similar in some way. • She was as big as a house. • His eyes were round as saucers. • The fog was so thick, it was like driving through soup. • His feet were as big as boats. • She is as beautiful as a sunrise. • She is as the sun rising over my horizon.

  34. Simile Important ! ! A simile is a figurative language technique where a comparison is made using like or as. Examples of similes: • She is like a rainy day. • He is as busy as a bee. • They are like two peas in a pod.

  35. Important ! ! Simile A figure of speech in which two essentially unlike things are compared, often in a phrase introduced by like or as, as in: “How like the winter hath my absence been” or “So are you to my thoughts as food to life” (Shakespeare).

  36. Complete your custom simile • The cat was as scary as a ____. • The night is like a ____. • The moon is like a ____ • The scarecrow was as scary as ____.

  37. Types of Figurative Language Metaphor — a comparison of two seemingly different things without using “like” or “as”. • Her hair was spun gold. • This homework is a breeze. • There are plenty of fish in the sea.

  38. Types of Figurative Language Metaphor — a comparison of two different things without using “like” or “as”. • Her hair was spun gold. • This homework is a breeze. • There are plenty of fish in the sea.

  39. METAPHOR • A direct comparison of two unlike things • A direct relationship where one thing or idea substitutes for another • For example: Her hair is silk. (The sentence is comparing or stating that hair is silk).

  40. EXTENDED METAPHOR • A metaphor that goes several lines or possibly the entire length of a work.

  41. IMPLIED METAPHOR • The comparison is hinted at but not clearly stated. • “The poison sacs of the town began to manufacture venom, and the town swelled and puffed with the pressure of it.” • from The Pearl • by John Steinbeck

  42. Metaphor Important ! ! A poetic comparison that does notuse the words like or as. Examples of metaphors: She is a graceful swan. He is a golden god. They are honey from the honeycomb.

  43. Metaphor A figure of speech in which a word or phrase that ordinarily designates one thing is used to designate another, thus making an implicit comparison, as in “a sea of troubles” or “All the world's a stage” (Shakespeare).

  44. Brian was a wall, bouncing every tennis ball back over the net. This metaphor compares Brian to a wall because __________. a. He was very strong. b. He was very tall. c. He kept returning the balls. d. His body was made of cells.

  45. We would have had more pizza to eat if Tammy hadn’t been such a hog. Tammy was being compared to a hog because she __________. a. looked like a hog b. ate like a hog c. smelled like a hog d. was as smart as a hog

  46. Cindy was such a mule. We couldn’t get her to change her mind. The metaphor compares Cindy to a mule because she was __________. a. always eating oats b. able to do hard work c. raised on a farm d. very stubborn

  47. The poor rat didn’t have a chance. Our old cat, a bolt of lightning, caught his prey. The cat was compared to a bolt of lightning because he was _______. • very fast • very bright • not fond of fleas • very old

  48. Even a child could carry my dog, Dogface, around for hours. He’s such a feather. This metaphor implies that Dogface: a. is not cute b. looks like a bird c. is not heavy d. can fly

  49. Types of Figurative Language Hyperbole — when the truth is exaggerated for humor or emphasis. • Your mama’s so fat, if someone yells, “Kool-aid,” she’ll jump through a wall! • I nearly died laughing. • I could eat a horse.

  50. Figurative Language: Hyperbole Hyperbole — when the truth is exaggerated for humor or emphasis. • I nearly died laughing. • I’m so hungry, I could eat a horse. • My backpack weighs a ton! • That’s the worst idea in the world!