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Grant Writing 101

Grant Writing 101

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Grant Writing 101

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  1. Grant Writing 101 Kaye Murry Arkansas Department of Health Southeast Region HHI Manager May 29, 2013

  2. Definitions • Request for Proposal: A notice from a funding agency or foundation to ask for proposals for new grant. They usually list program descriptions (what they will or won’t fund), deadlines and who is eligible.

  3. More Definitions • Grantor: the agency or organization that gives a grant. Also known as funder. • Grantee: Group that receives grant. • Letter of Intent (LOI): Letter submitted by the group to the Grantor. This tells them you are planning on writing an application. You are not required to complete an application just because you send an LOI.

  4. And More Definitions • Letter of Support: A brief letter by an “expert” or someone in your community that tells why he/she thinks the application should be funded. • Letter of Commitment: A brief letter by a community partner that tells how they will support the program-what part of the activities they will agree to do. • Letter of Inquiry: A short story that you write to the funder. Tells the potential funder about the group and gives them the change to see if you “fit” with their mission.

  5. Things to Remember • Research, Research, Research • Planning an application is VERY important • Recipe is: 2/3 planning and 1/3 writing • Getting funded takes time • It is never too early to start • No research or writing is ever wasted-it’s practice! • Follow all the guidelines and instructions.

  6. Following Instructions • Read the guidance • Read the guidance • Read the guidance • Read the guidance • Read the guidance • Read the guidance

  7. The Request for Applications • Who is eligible? • When is the deadline? • What is the award amount per grant? • Is there a matching requirement • Who do I contact with questions.

  8. Elements of Proposat • Abstract • Statemetn of Need • Goals and Objectives • Project personnel

  9. Information to include • Data • Does your program idea stand a good chance of being funded? • How does it fulfill the mission of the grantor? • How does it fulfill the mission of your organization?

  10. Case Statement • Who are you • What do you do • Why do you need the money • What are you going to do with it • How will the grantor know that you did it • Why should the grantor invest • How will the grantor benefit

  11. PROOF • Read it out loud several times • Double check spelling of names and make sure job titles are correct. • Let at least two other people proof read it for you. See if they understand what your request is for.

  12. Federal Grants • Individual agency web sites – DHHS, USDA, Dept. of ED • Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance www.cfda.gov

  13. Other Sources • If your interest is state government funds – individual state agency web sites (Health Dept., Dept. of Rural Services, AR Parks and Tourism) • If your interest is non-governmental funds • local community foundations • State, regional, or national foundations • Corporate foundations with businesses operating in your geographic area • Networking/word of mouth

  14. The Foundation Center • www.foundationcenter.org • Over 400 Arkansas Foundations listed • IRS 990s • Arkansas Cooperative Collections • Fayetteville Public Library • UA Fort Smith - Boreham Library • Central Arkansas Library System – Main Street Branch • Charles A. Frueauff Foundation Office • ASU – Norma Wood Library

  15. National Data Sources • US Census Bureau www.census.gov • CDC - www.cdc.gov/datastatistics

  16. Arkansas Data Sources • ADH Health Statistics Branch www.healthy.arkansas.com • UALR Data Center – http://www.aiea.ualr.edu • Become familiar with your local library

  17. Objectives • SMART (Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic and Time-bound) • Shows specific, measurable change • Always identify a baseline from which to measure progress • Here is where solutions begin

  18. Objectives vs. Action Steps • Objectives pertain to what will happen within the target population • Objectives contain common elements: • A time frame (by when) • The target population (who is being served) • Targeted behavior • Amount of measurable change expected (what and how it will be measured) • Action Steps pertain to what the applicant will do (means to the end or change) • Workshops, research, education classes, etc.