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Maintenance Modeling Tutorial

Maintenance Modeling Tutorial

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Maintenance Modeling Tutorial

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  1. Maintenance Modeling Tutorial © 2009 Alion Science and Technology Rev. 3 020409

  2. IMPRINT Pro The Improved Performance Research Integration Tool (IMPRINT) was developed for the Army Research Laboratory (ARL) Human Research and Engineering Directorate (HRED). This tutorial describes the professional version of IMPRINT, namely IMPRINT Pro. IMPRINT Pro is government owned and consists of a set of automated aids to assist analysts in conducting human performance analyses. It provides the means for estimating manpower, personnel and training (MPT) requirements and constraints for new weapon systems very early in the acquisition process.

  3. Purpose of the Maintenance Model The objective of the IMPRINT Pro Equipment/Maintenance module is to help you estimate maintenance manhour requirements for your system. This module lets you enter properties that control such items as the maintenance manpower pools, the spare availability, and the combat damage potential. These properties, coupled with a mission schedule and the data describing the maintenance actions that your system may need are combined in a stochastic maintenance simulation. The primary purpose of the simulation is to predict the maintenance manhours required to attain an acceptable system availability.

  4. Questions answered by the Maintenance Model • How many people of each specialty are required to meet the system availability requirement? • Which pieces of equipment are the high drivers for maintenance? • How should each organizational level be staffed? • How sensitive is my maintenance manpower requirement to the failure rate of individual components?

  5. Tutorial Topics This tutorial covers the following topics: • Maintenance Model Environment • Running a Model • Loading a Maintenance Model • Reports • Understanding Warfighters • Return to Introduction • Understanding Equipment: Subsystems and Scenarios • Performance Moderators

  6. To skip to any topic, simply click the corresponding hyperlink. To return to this topics page at any time during the tutorial, simply click the “Return to Topics” hyperlink located in the lower right-hand corner of your screen: Return to Topics Tutorial Topics This tutorial covers the following topics: • Maintenance Model Environment • Running a Model • Loading a Maintenance Model • Reports • Understanding Warfighters • Return to Introduction • Understanding Equipment: Subsystems and Scenarios • Performance Moderators

  7. Menu Bar Toolbar Properties Window Analysis Tree Output Window Message Bar Getting to know the Maintenance Model Environment The Maintenance Model environment has many elements which are similar to the Operations Model environment: Return to Topics

  8. Search and Replace Event Queue Getting to know the Maintenance Model Environment Some elements are used less in the Maintenance environment but still available for use: Windows Return to Topics

  9. Variable Watches Getting to know the Maintenance Model Environment Other elements not used by the Maintenance Model : * Network Diagram * Palette * *Used by Operations Model only Return to Topics

  10. Studying a Maintenance Model The Maintenance model is defined by the following three elements: • Warfighters. The pool of available specialties running your system. • Subsystems. The parts of your weapons system made up of various components requiring maintenance. • Scenarios. The conditions under which the system and its components will be used. In order to study these elements, we begin by loading up a sample analysis. Return to Topics

  11. Loading a Maintenance Model To see the Maintenance Model Environment first hand, a folder must first be added to the tree: 1. Right-mouse click the Local Server node. 2. Choose “New Folder.” A new folder appears. • The following can be added to any folder: • New Analyses • Library Analyses • Imported Analyses • New Analyses from Maintenance Template • New Analysis from MMF Template Return to Topics

  12. Loading a Maintenance Model To see the Maintenance Model Environment first hand, load a sample library model as follows: 1. Right-mouse click the desired folder. 2. In the shortcut menu which appears, select “Library Analysis.” 3. In the list that appears, select the “Close Combat Heavy M1 Abrams Tank” Model. Return to Topics

  13. Loading a Maintenance Model The newly added analysis is highlighted to indicate that it is the currently-loaded analysis. The Tank Model appears in the Analysis Tree: The Properties Window displays additional information about this analysis. Return to Topics

  14. Loading an Operations Model With the Tank Model analysis loaded in the tree, we may begin to view its elements as follows: Click the plus “+” sign next to the analysis name. Note the list of nodes below: The nodes primarily used by the Maintenance Model are the Warfighters and Equipment nodes. We begin with the Warfighters node. Return to Topics

  15. Understanding Warfighters The Maintenance aspect of any analysis begins by locating the Warfighters node in the tree: 1. Click the plus “+” sign next to the Warfighters node to expand it. 2. Note the nodes that appear. 3. Look for the Maintainers node. 4. Click the plus “+” sign next to the Maintainers node to expand it. Return to Topics

  16. Understanding Warfighters Maintainer data may be viewed as follows: 1. Single-click a listed maintainer. Its corresponding properties appear in the Properties window. 2. Double-click the same maintainer to display this same information in the main IMPRINT Pro window. In this example, we see that our 45K specialty is a Tank Turret Repairer. Return to Topics

  17. Understanding Equipment: Subsystems and Scenarios Next, locate the Equipment node in the tree: 1. Look for the Equipment node, directly under the Missions node. 2. Click the plus “+” sign next to the Equipment node to expand it. Return to Topics

  18. 1. Subsystems 2. Scenarios Understanding Equipment: Subsystems and Scenarios Note that the Equipment node contains two elements: Return to Topics

  19. Communications Armament Engine Turret Structure Suspension and Tracks Subsystems Subsystems are the larger parts of your weapon system that are made up of various components. The following are examples of subsystems : Return to Topics

  20. Viewing Subsystems Subsystems may be viewed by expanding the node in the tree: 1. Locate the Subsystems node in your analysis. 2. Click the plus “+” sign to expand the Subsystems list. * * * 3. Note the subsystems which appear. * * Return to Topics

  21. Subsystem Components All Subsystems are made up of Components. Below are some examples of Components: Cannon Breech Cannon Tube Return to Topics

  22. Viewing Components Components may be viewed by expanding the node in the tree: • Select a subsystem from the tree. 2. Click the plus “+” sign next to the node to expand it. The Components node appears below. 3. Click the plus “+” sign next to the Components node to see the list of Components this particular subsystem contains. * * 4. Note the components which appear. Return to Topics

  23. Component Repair Tasks Subsystem Components require repairs on a regular basis. The following are examples of Repair Tasks a component may require: Adjust and Repair Inspect Remove and Replace Test and Check Troubleshoot All Repair Tasks can be of type Preventive or Corrective. Return to Topics

  24. Viewing Repair Tasks Repair tasks may be viewed by expanding the node in the tree: • Select a component from the tree. 2. Click the plus “+” sign next to the component to expand the node. Note the Repair Tasks node appears. 3. Click the plus “+” sign next to the Repair Tasks node to list out the repair tasks this component requires. The component Cannon Tube contains one Repair Task of the “Adjust and Repair” category. * Return to Topics

  25. This task is a Corrective Adjust and Repair task. It may be done at the direct support level when the part is removed from (or “off”) the system. Only a 45G specialty with a minimum skill level of 20 can do this task. Only one is required. This repair task is needed approximately every 3400 hours when the component fails. It takes about 11.67 hours to complete this repair task. 66% of the time, this maintenance action will cause a specific system’s participation in the segment to end prematurely. Neither the Contact Team nor the Crew Chief may perform the maintenance. It must be taken to a Direct Support facility (see A above) for repairs. Viewing Repair Tasks Click directly on this repair task to see its properties: Return to Topics

  26. Scenarios Scenarios are the conditions under which the system and its components will be used. A scenario may contain several segments (timed deployments of specific numbers of systems), each drawing from the same pool of resources for repairs. Return to Topics

  27. Viewing Scenarios View the list of Scenarios in your analysis as follows: 1. Locate the Scenarios node in your analysis tree. It is the second node under Equipment. 2. Click the plus “+” sign next to the Scenarios node to expand the list. 3. The scenario “Ten Days of Missions” appears. Return to Topics

  28. Viewing Scenarios To select a scenario, single-click it in the analysis tree. 1. Select the scenario “Ten Days of Missions” in the tree. 2. Note that the Properties Grid displays information related to your Scenario. Return to Topics

  29. Viewing Scenarios Double-click the same scenario to display its properties in the main window as well: The middle IMPRINT Pro window displays the same information but categorized among different tabbed windows: Note: all nodes in the tree may be double-clicked to view their information this way. Return to Topics

  30. Elements of a Scenario Scenarios comprise the following 7 elements: Segments * Spares Maintenance Crew Fuel Supply Contact Team Ammo Supply Travel Time *Note: Segments is the only element that is also a node in the analysis tree. Return to Topics

  31. Segment 1: Deploy 4 systems at time 0500z. Segment 2: Deploy 2 systems at time 0700z. Segment 3: Deploy 1 systems at time 0730z. Segments Segments are scheduled deployments which establish usage of specific numbers of systems. This usage possibly leads to component failure. Return to Topics

  32. Viewing Segments View the segments in your analysis as follows: 1. Locate the Scenario in the tree whose segments you wish to view. 2. Click the plus “+” sign next to it - the Segments node appears. 3. Click the plus “+” sign next to the Segments node to see the list of segments this particular scenario contains. 4. Note the segments which appear: This scenario has one segment entitled “Mission 1.” Return to Topics

  33. Viewing Segments Next, to select a segment, single-click it in the tree. Return to Topics

  34. Viewing Segments Once you have selected a segment from the tree, the properties window populates with data pertaining to that segment: Double-click the segment to see the segment properties information in the main screen, as well. Return to Topics

  35. Viewing Segments There are three main elements to each segment: 2. Combat 1. Segment Info 3. Consumables Return to Topics

  36. Segment Info Segments are defined by the following parameters: If another segment is occurring at the same time and is competing for systems, the segment with the higher priority gets available systems first. This segment begins at 0.0 hours on day 1. If the minimum number of systems (see bottom of page) are not available by 0.5 hours, the segment is cancelled. For four hours, this segment will be requesting systems from the pool. This segment will continue, as will system requests, even if no sytems are available. Only 4 systems will ever be assigned to this segment from the available pool of systems. At least 1 system must go out every 0.17 hours if one is available to send. Return to Topics

  37. Combat Combat may affect your system availability. It will ultimately also affect your manpower estimates due to the need for maintainers to make system repairs. For every hour the system is in use, there is a 50% chance the system will sustain a hit in combat. There is a 25% chance that the hit will render the system a total loss. It will take 7.00 hours to replace it with an entirely new system if the system is a total loss. It will take 15 hours to repair the system to a functional level if repairs are possible. Return to Topics

  38. Consumables Based on the numbers entered in the window below, IMPRINT calculates the operational units consumed (rounds fired, gallons used, miles traveled) at all times during the model run. This system will travel 20 units (e.g., miles) per hour and will consume 40 gallons of fuel per mile. This system needs 3.0 hours of prep/load time before the segment begins. It is estimated that each subsystem will consume approximately 15 rounds in each segment. Consumables are important because they are the parameters on which component failures are triggered. For example, if a cannon tube (of subsystem armament) is estimated to fail every 180 rounds fired, then we can expect this failure to occur approximately when our system reaches its 12th segment (180 rounds/ (15 rounds/segment) = 12 segments). Return to Topics

  39. Fuel Supply Return to Topics

  40. Fuel Supply The Fuel Supply option helps to factor in Suppliers and Supporters in your manpower requirement estimates. It is located on the second tab from the left in the main window of your scenario. Return to Topics

  41. Fuel Supply Fuel Supply adds the following information to your model: You can specify, by transporter, the amount of fuel each can carry. This transporter can make a maximum of 4 trips in one day. More trips per transporter means less transporters required overall. Therefore less transporter operators are required. Three supply/support personnel of MOS specialty 63A are required to run this transporter. Return to Topics

  42. Ammo Supply Return to Topics

  43. Ammo Supply The Ammo Supply option, similar to the Fuel Supply option, helps to factor in Suppliers and Supporters in your manpower requirement estimates since ammunition, like fuel, must also be transported to the systems requiring it. It is located on the third tab from the left in the main window of your scenario. Return to Topics

  44. Ammo Supply Ammo Supply adds the following information to your analysis: Transporter name/Weapon System Capacity (# of rounds) Specialty type(s) required Amount of those specialty type(s) required * Max number of daily trips *More trips means less transporters and transporter operators required overall. Return to Topics

  45. Travel Time Return to Topics

  46. Travel Time The time it takes a system to travel from the point of breakdown to a repair facility is known as the Travel Time. This time required is added to the total time to repair to accurately reflect system availability. It is located on the fourth tab from the left in the main window of your scenario. Return to Topics

  47. Travel Time In IMPRINT Pro, maintenance facilities are divided into four categories: 1. ORG (Ogranizational Support): Maintenance can be done at the Unit level. These repairs are always done ON the system. DS Facility 2. DS (Direct Support): Repair Team is located typically at a facility nearby. Entire systems can be taken to this facility. Specific parts can also be shipped to this facility. 3. GS (General Support): Maintenance facility is located remotely from system, and only parts of a system can be sent to the facility for repairs. GS Facility 4. Contact Team: a mobile repair team goes out to the system to do repairs. Return to Topics

  48. Travel Time Travel Time can be specified as follows: Travel time from system breakdown to each of the different maintenance facilities Travel time from one maintenance facility type to another. The time it would take a contact team to reach the location of the system. Return to Topics

  49. Spares Return to Topics

  50. Spares Spares affect system availability. If a system has spare parts readily accessible, it may be returned to service sooner than a system which must wait for a spare part. It is located on the fifth tab from the left in the main window of your scenario. Return to Topics