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Developing High-Functioning Leadership Teams

Developing High-Functioning Leadership Teams

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Developing High-Functioning Leadership Teams

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  1. Developing High-Functioning Leadership Teams Presented by Tina Nazier, MBA May 27, 2016

  2. Agenda • What does a high-functioning team look like? • How does our team rate? • What are our potential weaknesses? • What is our conflict profile? • Achieving commitment • How can we create an accountability culture? • What results should we focus on? • Next steps

  3. Elements of High-Functioning Teams Focus on Results Source: Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions of a Team; Lencioni, 2005

  4. Quick Team Assessment of Five Areas

  5. Trust

  6. Building Trust in a High-Functioning Team Trust is the foundation of every relationship. Trust is the MOST important element of high-functioning teams. Trust is important at the: • Fundamental level • Emotional level • Willingness to be “vulnerable” in front of others Complete openness and honesty, without filters, is necessary to build trust** (**Caveat – Must be done in a respectful manner) Trust takes time!!!

  7. Howdo we build trust? So what is trust? • Trust is NOT the ability to predict behaviors of others. • Trust is about willingness to be comfortable exposing your personal failures, weaknesses, and even fears around others on the team. • Trust is believing in someone else. • This type of trust is hard to achieve – Why?

  8. Trust Exercise Let’s start with each person addressing the following three questions: • Where did you grow up? • How many siblings in your family? • What was your greatest challenge when you were a kid?

  9. Profiles of the Team What do we each bring to the team?

  10. How do we fit in the Project Continuum?

  11. Motivating Needs

  12. Our Sailboat Components

  13. Trust – Closing Thoughts • None of us is successful if only one of us is successful. • Our collective success is predicated on building trust among our leadership team. • Trust needs to be developed and nurtured continually. • When relationships fail, lack of trust is usually one of the causes. takes time.

  14. Creative Conflict • Trust is leveraged through conflict • Conflict is both necessary and healthy • Not everyone views conflict the same (fearful, avoidance, etc.) • Look at our PIs • Conflict is uncomfortable

  15. To become a high-functioning team, we need to master passionate debate of differing views and opinions around our critical issues.

  16. Conflict Continuum Source: Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions of a Team; Lencioni, 2005

  17. Conflict Resolution Conflict comes in layers: • Informational – Content • Facts, Opinions, Perspectives • Environmental – Atmosphere in which discussion is taking place • Culture, Physical, Politics, Mood • Relationship – Problems/issues between people • Style, Reputation, Position, Organization • Individual – One person has deficiency that limits healthy dialogue • Self-Esteem, Knowledge, EQ, IQ, Experience, Skills, Values, Style

  18. Mastering Conflict Let’s complete the written exercise in the handout to determine our team’s conflict tendencies and areas we can improve . . .

  19. Conflict Resolution Exercise Small Group Activity • Where has my team had a conflict that hasn’t been resolved? • What prior discussions have we had? • What can we do differently next time?

  20. Conflict Resolution – Closing Thoughts Why is conflict so important for high-functioning teams? • Lack of conflict hinders getting all information in the pool of shared meaning. • Incomplete information in the pool leads to limited success in making the best decisions. • TENSION

  21. We have an obligation to engage in healthy, creative conflict in order to get the best results for our patients!

  22. Commitment Two separate but related concepts: • Buy-in • Clarity

  23. Buy-In Buy-In is necessary for commitment. Commitment is not CONSENSUS! Consensus leads to: • Mediocrity • Delay • Frustration

  24. Defy Consensus High-functioning leadership teams have the strength and character to buy-in to decisions when members don’t all agree.

  25. Everyone Needs to be Heard Everyone’s ideas will not be adopted . . . But everyone’s ideas must be heard, appreciated, and understood. Once this happens . . . Mission accomplished! Buy-in achieved!

  26. Clarity • Clarity allows for alignment around a decision • Clarity eliminates confusion and frustration Commitment cannot be achieved unless everyone knows exactly what they are committing to. Ambiguity has no place in high-functioning teams!

  27. Don’t Settle for Ambiguity Commit to the key principles • Purpose • Values • Mission • Strategy • Goals Commit to thematic goals • Rally around the common cause – single common unifying goal for the team Cascade commitment to the entire team (within 24 hours)

  28. To Achieve Clarity . . . Ask everyone to articulate: What have we decided today?

  29. Clarity – Closing Thoughts • Clarity allows for alignment around a decision • Clarity eliminates confusion and frustration Commitment cannot be achieved unless everyone knows exactly what they are committing to.

  30. Accountability The best form of accountability is that which does not require the participation of the leader. • Direct, peer-to-peer; concern for letting each other down • Must be accountable for results AND behaviors • Behavioral issues usually precede lack of results • Natural tendency is to “overlook” behaviors • Respect is lacking • We let the team down

  31. Team Behavior Exercise What is the single most important behavioral characteristic or quality that this individual contributes to the strength of our team? What is the single most important behavioral characteristic or quality that this individual demonstrates that derails our team?

  32. Accountability – Closing Thoughts • Accountability at meetings: • Start with a “lightning round” • Everyone tells their top three priorities for the week/month. • Everyone, including the leader, must be willing to confront accountability issues. • No one is successful if only one of us is successful!

  33. Focusing on Results Even with our best intentions, we may lose focus on results. Why do we lose focus? How can we regain focus?

  34. Keeping Track Results-oriented teams establish their own measurements with little or no wiggle room! What’s on our scorecard?

  35. Results - MUSTs • Must prioritize results of the team over results of the individual • Must maintain a simple, meaningful scorecard for everyone to see our progress • Must study results to ensure we are achieving our desired goals • Must make course corrections as necessary to stay on track

  36. How can we use this information? Two actions you will take on Monday

  37. Leader Role

  38. Tina Nazier, MBA, Director Health Care Strategic Alignment 715.858.6640 tnazier@wipfli.com www.wipfli.com/healthcare