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Characteristics of sexually experienced Native American teens: the Minnesota Student Survey, 1998 and 2001 . PowerPoint Presentation
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Characteristics of sexually experienced Native American teens: the Minnesota Student Survey, 1998 and 2001 .

Characteristics of sexually experienced Native American teens: the Minnesota Student Survey, 1998 and 2001 .

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Characteristics of sexually experienced Native American teens: the Minnesota Student Survey, 1998 and 2001 .

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  1. Characteristics of sexually experienced Native American teens: the Minnesota Student Survey, 1998 and 2001. University partners: Kris Rhodes MPH; Wendy Hellerstedt, MPH, PhD; Ann Garwick, PhD,RN,LMFT,LP Community consultants: Justin Huenemann; Shawnee Hunt; Julia Littlewolf; War Eagle Martin; Carrie Morris, MSW; Melanie Peterson-Hickey, PhD; Lisa Skjefte This project was supported under a cooperative agreement from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention through the Association of Schools of Public Health. Grant Number U36/CCU300430-22. The contents of this presentation are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC or ASPH.

  2. Sexually experienced adolescents are at high risk for sexually transmitted infections and pregnancy. Effective programs to reduce such risks must take into account the characteristics of the youth. Limited data about Native youth specific to decision-making in relation to sexual activity, birth control and pregnancy. Background

  3. What is N*TV? Native Teen Voices (N*TV) is a: • Partnership between the Twin Cities Native community and the University of Minnesota School of Public Health • Analysis of existing survey data • Native-led data collection - focus groups and surveys • Native guided - data analysis and interpretation • Information that is useful to both Native and public health communities.

  4. Phase One: • Examine survey data for information about teen decision-making about sexual activity. • Ever had sexual intercourse for 13-15 & 16-18 year olds. • Reasons for not having sex for 13-15 & 16-18 year olds. • Use of birth control among sexually experienced teens. • Ever been involved in a pregnancy for 16-18 year olds. Phase Two: • Through focus groups, ask Native youth their opinions about teen pregnancy and parenting. • A survey will allow them to voice their personal attitudes on teen pregnancy, sexual behavior, teen assets, and connection to culture.

  5. Methods • The 1998 and 2001 statewide school-based surveys were combined and analyzed to identify the risk and protective factors associated with having ever had vaginal intercourse (i.e., sexual experience). • These factors were guided by the Theory of Triadic Influence and included environmental, social and personal influences. • Stepwise logistic regression analysis produced odds ratios (OR) for sexual experience, stratified by sex and age group (13-15 and 16-18 yrs).

  6. Theory of triadic influences on decision-making: variables in the model

  7. Sexual Health of Native Youth: Minnesota Student Survey, 1998 and 2001, n=4135

  8. Factors Associated with Ever Had Sex: 13-15 year-old Males

  9. Factors Associated with Ever Had Sex: 16-18 year-old Males

  10. Factors Associated with Ever Had Sex: 13-15 year-old Females

  11. Factors Associated with Ever Had Sex: 16-18 year-old Females

  12. Summary • Of the 4135 Native teens, 42% of the younger (i.e., 13-15 yr-olds) and 69% of the older (i.e., 16-18 yr-olds) were sexually experienced, with no significant differences by sex. • For 13-15 year-olds, sexual experience was positively associated with other health risks, especially those related to weight control, substance use, and exposure to violence. Measures of school and family connections were generally protective. • For older youth, substance use, exposure to violence, and personal characteristics were associated with risk, while school connectedness was protective.

  13. Conclusions • This description of the characteristics of sexually experienced Native youth can guide the development of risk-reduction programs, but Phase Two of this project will provide even more information because most surveys do not include enough questions about: • youth assets • culturally-specific factors

  14. Contact Information Kris Rhodes, MPH Native Teen Voices Division of Epidemiology School of Public Health University of Minnesota 1300 South Second Street, Suite 300 Minneapolis, MN 55454 612-626-8574 (phone) rhodes@epi.umn.edu