WMSD Mentor Program - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

presented by adam r schepman ed s wmsd school psychology specialist n.
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WMSD Mentor Program

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  1. Presented by: Adam R. Schepman, Ed. S WMSD School Psychology Specialist WMSD Mentor Program

  2. Construction of positive relationships between students and the school community at large • Establish meaningful connections between work and community • Develop personal skills and career awareness • Build relationships between students and caring adults Mission Statement

  3. Empower students to explore and expand personal interests • Increase student • achievement potential • Skills for success • Applications of ethics • Sense of responsibility • Increase school-community engagement Vision Statement

  4. Mentors will provide • Positive relationships with caring adults • Framework for positive future growth & decision making skills • Students an opportunity to develop their own vision for the future Goals and Objectives

  5. Mentors will provide • A sense of community • More opportunities for career awareness and exploration • More opportunities for positive connection between students and: • Schools • Local Businesses • Communities Goals and Objectives

  6. Servicing students in grades K-12 while maintaining the following • Professional relationship at all times promoting the students mental, physical, and emotional health and safety • Respect for the student • In no way demean, embarrass, or harass students • Nurture intellectual, physical, emotional, social, and civic potential • Display concern and compassion for student’s personal challenges • Refer to counseling if necessary Protocol/Standards

  7. Merriam-Webster • Mentor-(n) a trusted counselor or guide • Advocate-(n) one that supports or promotes the interests of another • All school personnel are advocates by default • West Memphis School District • Mentor-(n) an advocate who is willing to spend his/her time and expertise to guide the development of another person Terms

  8. Program Structure District Advisory Committee Public Relations/Communication Training/Prof. Development Data Collection School Advisory Committee Mentors

  9. Confidentiality training • How to pair students with mentors • Different factors to consider • Questions to think about • Mentor/Mentee Activities • Mentor support Program Operations

  10. Any information discussed between mentor and mentee is kept Confidential; meaning information is not shared with others unless • Student is a threat to themselves (duty to protect) • Student is a threat to others (duty to warn) • All information gathered for research, program evaluation, or consultation must be de-identified • All identity (name, date of birth, SSN, student number, etc) must be removed Confidentiality

  11. Components required to break confidentiality (Duty to Warn/Duty to Protect) • Serious threat to harm self or another (Threat) • Typically stated verbally • Means to Carry out the threat (Access) • Shooting threat and has access to a gun, overdose on obtainable medications • Plan of action (Plan) • Expression of how/when harm will occur When to break Confidentiality

  12. Second grader at a local school mentioned that he planned on “killing himself.” • “Reason” • Generally unhappy at school, kids “checkin’” him • Mom had gotten a new boyfriend • Student had negative relationship with the new boyfriend • “Means” • “Gonna let a train run over/hit me” • Student lived near a railroad tracks (knowledge provided by school staff) • “Plan” • Said was going to do it “soon” Recent real life example

  13. Legal/Ethical responsibilities to warn a third party (person) when a threat is made • Mentor/Counselor has been working with Tim for 5 weeks. There is good rapport between student and staff. Tim has been depressed for the past 3 weeks and states that John, a classmate, is picking on him. In the most recent session, Tim seems to have a more positive affect and states that his father has bought him a shotgun for hunting. Tim said he could use the gun to shoot the student picking on him after school. Duty to Warn

  14. Components of Duty to Warn • Mentor/Counselor has been working with Tim for 5 weeks. There is good rapport between student and staff. Tim has been depressed for the past 3 weeks and states that John, a classmate, (identifiable target) is picking on him. In the most recent session, Tim seems to have a more positive affect and states that his father has bought him a shotgun for hunting (access). Tim said he could use the gun to shoot the student picking on him after school (plan). Duty to Warn

  15. Example of a Duty to Protect • Mentor and Sam have been working together for 5 months. There is good rapport between them and Sam has been very open with the mentor. Sam has disclosed to his mentor that his parents are addicts, verbally abuse him, and have hit him in the past. Sam has stated that he wants to die and that he planned to overdose on his parents drugs during the upcoming weekend. Duty to Protect

  16. Components ofDuty to Protect • Mentor and Sam have been working together for 5 months. There is good rapport between them and Sam has been very open with the mentor. Sam has disclosed to his mentor that his parents are addicts, verbally abuse him, and have hit him in the past. Sam has stated that he wants to die (threat) and that he planned to overdose on his parents drugs (plan & access) during the upcoming weekend. Duty to Protect

  17. Variety of Factors to consider in Mentor/Mentee relationships • Genders, ethnic background, educational levels, common interests, student social skills, mentor behavior tolerance, etc • With whom does the student (mentee) interact best with (based on observed data and reported past experiences) How to pair Mentors with Mentees

  18. Vignette-Student history • Shenika is a 6th grade student in WMSD. She has a history of drug use. Counselor notes indicate she was sexually abused by her father at age 8 and he has been in prison since the conviction. School records indicate she shows more aggression/defiant behavior with male staff members and during transition times. She has average/grade level speech and academic abilities. How to pair Mentors with Mentees

  19. Mentor/Mentee placement need not be permanent • Problems may arise • Mentor or Mentee based interpersonal problems • Staffing issues • Scheduling difficulties • Parent/student acceptance/refusal • Watch for dual relationships • Conflicts of interest How to pair Mentors with Mentees

  20. Organized events for mentor/mentee interaction • School level functions • Career/Job Information Seminar • Lunches • Mid-South Community College Mentor/Mentee Activities

  21. Supervision • Crisis Support • School based crisis response teams • Student voiced concerns of suicide/violence • Student reporting pregnancy Mentor Support

  22. Review school level planning • Review relevant and reality based data to determine effectiveness of program • Available data sources • Rating scales (Quantitative) • Completed before entry into program and then monthly basis (for temporary placements) • Survey (Qualitative) • Questionnaires for students/parents to complete • Methods of improving school developed plans • Review/Analyze data collected Program Evaluation

  23. Mentors Mentees (Students with…) • Teachers • Paraprofessionals • Custodians • Cafeteria Staff • Academic Coaches • Secretaries • Counselors • Principals • Asst. Principals • Agency Therapists • Social Workers • Case Managers • Community Volunteers • Poor attendance • Multiple Retentions • Academic distress • Inappropriate Behaviors • Poor Hygiene • Lack of resources • Lack of academic/social concern • Social Withdrawal • Non-traditional students • Neglected/abused • Drastic change in family structure • (foster care, divorce, incarceration, death, homelessness) Potential Program Members

  24. Thank you for your time! aschepman@wmsd.net Click here to complete training