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EECS 349 Machine Learning

EECS 349 Machine Learning. Instructor: Doug Downey Note: slides adapted from Pedro Domingos, University of Washington, CSE 546. Logistics. Instructor: Doug Downey Email: ddowney@eecs.northwestern.edu Office: Ford 3-345 Office hours: Wednesdays 3:00-4:30 (or by appt)

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EECS 349 Machine Learning

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  1. EECS 349Machine Learning Instructor: Doug Downey Note: slides adapted from Pedro Domingos, University of Washington, CSE 546

  2. Logistics • Instructor: Doug Downey • Email: ddowney@eecs.northwestern.edu • Office: Ford 3-345 • Office hours: Wednesdays 3:00-4:30 (or by appt) • TA: Francisco Iacobelli • Email: 'f-iacobelli@northwestern.edu‘ • Office: Ford 2-202 • Office Hours: Tuesdays 2:00-3:00 • Web:www.eecs.northwestern.edu/~downey/courses/349/

  3. Evaluation • Three homeworks (50% of grade) • Assigned Friday of weeks 1, 3, and 5 • Due two weeks later • Via e-mail at 5:00PM Thursday • Late assignments will not be graded (!) • Some programming, some exercises • Final Project (50%) • Teams of 2 or 3 • Proposal due Thursday, October 16th

  4. Source Materials • T. Mitchell, Machine Learning,McGraw-Hill (Required) • Papers

  5. Case Study: Farecast

  6. A Few Quotes • “A breakthrough in machine learning would be worthten Microsofts” (Bill Gates, Chairman, Microsoft) • “Machine learning is the next Internet” (Tony Tether, Director, DARPA) • “Machine learning is the hot new thing” (John Hennessy, President, Stanford) • “Web rankings today are mostly a matter of machine learning” (Prabhakar Raghavan, Dir. Research, Yahoo) • “Machine learning is going to result in a real revolution” (Greg Papadopoulos, CTO, Sun) • “Machine learning is today’s discontinuity” (Jerry Yang, CEO, Yahoo)

  7. So What Is Machine Learning? • Automating automation • Getting computers to program themselves • Writing software is the bottleneck • Let the data do the work instead!

  8. Traditional Programming Machine Learning Computer Data Output Program Computer Data Program Output

  9. Magic? No, more like gardening • Seeds = Algorithms • Nutrients = Data • Gardener = You • Plants = Programs

  10. Sample Applications • Web search • Computational biology • Finance • E-commerce • Space exploration • Robotics • Information extraction • Social networks • Debugging • [Your favorite area]

  11. ML in a Nutshell • Tens of thousands of machine learning algorithms • Hundreds new every year • Every machine learning algorithm has three components: • Representation • Evaluation • Optimization

  12. Representation • Decision trees • Sets of rules / Logic programs • Instances • Graphical models (Bayes/Markov nets) • Neural networks • Support vector machines • Model ensembles • Etc.

  13. Evaluation • Accuracy • Precision and recall • Squared error • Likelihood • Posterior probability • Cost / Utility • Margin • Entropy • K-L divergence • Etc.

  14. Optimization • Combinatorial optimization • E.g.: Greedy search • Convex optimization • E.g.: Gradient descent • Constrained optimization • E.g.: Linear programming

  15. Types of Learning • Supervised (inductive) learning • Training data includes desired outputs • Unsupervised learning • Training data does not include desired outputs • Semi-supervised learning • Training data includes a few desired outputs • Reinforcement learning • Rewards from sequence of actions

  16. Inductive Learning • Given examples of a function (X, F(X)) • Predict function F(X) for new examples X • Discrete F(X): Classification • Continuous F(X): Regression • F(X) = Probability(X): Probability estimation

  17. What We’ll Cover • Supervised learning • Decision tree induction • Rule induction • Instance-based learning • Neural networks • Support vector machines • Bayesian Learning • Learning theory • Unsupervised learning • Clustering • Dimensionality reduction

  18. What You’ll Learn • When can I use ML? • …and when is it doomed to failure? • For a given problem, how do I: • Express as an ML task • Choose the right ML algorithm • Evaluate the results • What are the unsolved problems/new frontiers?

  19. ML in Practice • Understanding domain, prior knowledge, and goals • Data integration, selection, cleaning,pre-processing, etc. • Learning models • Interpreting results • Consolidating and deploying discovered knowledge • Loop

  20. Reading for This Week • Mitchell, Chapters 1 & 2 • Wired data mining article (linked on course Web page)(don’t take it too seriously)

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