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Common Core Literacy Standards for Content Area Teachers

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Common Core Literacy Standards for Content Area Teachers

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  1. Common Core Literacy Standards for Content Area Teachers

  2. Job Alike Seating Please make sure you are seated at the appropriate table for your level and content Insert photo of table tent here

  3. Table Introductions • Name, School, Grade Level, Courses • What you hope to get out of today’s session • Choose A/B Partner

  4. Today’s Agenda

  5. Learning Targets • I can analyze and articulate ELA standards for my content area. • I can help develop my student’s ability to read my content area text. • I can develop student activities and assessments that support ELA standards in my content area. Starting … Getting there… Got it! Starting … Getting there… Got it! Starting … Getting there… Got it!

  6. Current Understanding with CCSS • 4 I can lead trainings • 3 I’ve begun transitioning my own practice • 2 I know what they are • 1 This is totally new to me

  7. K-W-L

  8. The way we learn "If reform plans are to be made operational, enabling teachers to really change the way they work, then teachers must have opportunities to talk, think, try, and hone new practices, which means they must be involved in learning about, developing, and using new ideas with their students.”-Lieberman, A.

  9. Common Core State Standards (CCSS)

  10. Anticipation Guide Mark Yes/No/? in the left column Independently then with A/B Partner

  11. Common Core State Standards Initiative • A joint effort: • National Governors Association • Council of Chief State School Officers • A State-Led initiative • The federal government did not develop the standards nor require their adoption

  12. Goals of CCSS • U.S. students will become more competitive with A+ countries. • Colleges will have less remediation for incoming students. • Students across the country will have standards that are of equal rigor. • Allows for development of common assessments and teaching materials.

  13. Standards Development Process • College and Career-Readiness standards for English / Language Arts and Mathematics developed in summer of 2009 • K-12 standards for each grade were created • Continual input throughout the process from states, educators, business and higher education leaders with 10,000 responses during the public comment period

  14. Standards Development Process • Final standards were released on June 2, 2010 • Adopted by Oregon State Board of Education on October 28, 2010 • ELA & Literacy in History/SS, Science and Technical Subjects • Mathematics

  15. Students are College and Career Ready when they can . . . • Demonstrate Independence: comprehend complex texts in all content areas • Build strong content knowledge across all subjects and disciplines • Respond to varying demands of audience, task, purpose, and discipline

  16. Students are College and Career Ready when they can . . . • Comprehend and critique • Value evidence • Use technology and digital media strategically and capably • Understand other perspectives and cultures

  17. The Standards Define: • What is most essential • Grade level expectations • What students are expected to know and be able to do • Cross-disciplinary literacy skills • Mathematical habits of mind

  18. The Standards Do NOT Define: • How teachers should teach • All that can or should be taught • The nature of advanced work • Intervention methods or materials • The full range of supports for English learners and students with special needs

  19. Processing Time The CCSS define ______, but they do not define ________.

  20. Instructional Shift #6Literacy Instruction in all Content Areas

  21. CCR ELA/Literacy Strands College and Career Readiness (CCR) Anchor Standards are divided into four interrelated literacy strands.

  22. Other CCR Strand Subheadings • Reading • Key Ideas and Details • Craft and Structure • Integration of Knowledge and Ideas • Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity • Writing • Text Types and Purposes • Production and Distribution of Writing • Research to Build and Present Knowledge • Range of Writing

  23. Other CCR Strand Subheadings • Speaking and Listening • Comprehension and Collaboration • Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas • Language • Conventions of Standard English • Knowledge of Language • Vocabulary Acquisition and Use

  24. CCSS ELA Structure Anchor Standard: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. Grade Level Subheading WHST.9-10.1 Standard

  25. CCSS Appendices: A, B and C Appendix A: Research Supporting Key Elements of the Standards (143 pages) *New supplement out last fall Appendix B: Text Exemplars and Sample Performance Tasks (183 pages) Appendix C: Samples of Student Writing (107 pages)

  26. Important CCSS Shifts for ELA in the Content Areas: • Increase reading of informational text • Text Complexity • Academic Vocabulary • Text-based Answers • Increase Writing From Sources • Literacy Instruction in all Content Areas

  27. Disciplinary Literacy What is Literacy? Literacy is the ability to read, write, listen, speak, think critically, and perform in different ways and for different purposes. ~Wisconsin Common Core State Standards For Literacy What is Disciplinary Literacy? Disciplinary Literacy is advanced literacy instruction embedded within content-areas. Disciplinary Literacy instruction engages learners with content in ways that mirror what scientists and mathematicians do to inquire and gain understanding in their disciplines. ~Shanahan and Shanahan 2008

  28. Scavenger Hunt Work as partners or small groups to complete the scavenger hunt using your standards packet.

  29. Anticipation Guide Answer Key

  30. What are you already doing? • Brainstorm what students already read and write in your class. • Look through your standards and determine which standards you are either already addressing, or you could address with some simple modifications.

  31. CCSS Toolkit: Content Area Literacy

  32. Learning Targets • I can analyze and articulate ELA standards for my content area. • I can help develop my student’s ability to read my content area text. • I can develop student activities and assessments that support ELA standards in my content area. Starting … Getting there… Got it! Starting … Getting there… Got it! Starting … Getting there… Got it!

  33. Break I still want to know about . I hope I learn more about . Other comments:

  34. Instructional Shift #2Text Complexity

  35. Quantitative Quantitative Information should drive placement of texts into Grade Bands.

  36. Qualitative 1. Structure of the text – Chronological order, simple graphics, well-marked vs. more complex text structures 2. Language conventionality and clarity – how familiar is the language of the text. 3. Knowledge Demands- Make few assumptions about the extent of readers’ life experiences and the depth of their cultural/literary and content/discipline knowledge vs. texts that make assumptions. 4. Levels of meaning (literary) or Purpose (informational): Satire may be more difficult. Or an informational text with a more obscure purpose. Qualitative Information should drive placement of texts into specific grades.

  37. How do I know if my text is complex? • Quantitative lens • Lexile Analyzer • Gale Power Search (Advanced Search) • Qualitative • Have you been studying this topic? Do they have background? High-interest?

  38. Instructional Shift #1Increase Reading of Informational Text

  39. Who Are You as a Reader? • What do you feel comfortable reading? • What do you not like to read and how do you handle this? • What do students need to be able to read for everyday life? • What do students need to be able to read for your specific content area?

  40. List the things you’ve read in the last 48 hours.

  41. Ok…I get it…But how do I do it?

  42. Think Alouds • Expert Blind Spot (Wiggins) • “…the failure to grasp that key lessons involve understandings that have to be engineered, not facts to be transmitted. When the Expert Blind Spot is at work, we have lost sight of this understanding about understanding. What is obvious to us is rarely obvious to a novice—and was once not obvious to us either, but we have forgotten our former views and struggles” (Understanding By Design).

  43. Let’s Try This…

  44. Just so your expert blind spot will not get in the way…House Bill 2220 Read the house bill and write a short summary of the bill. What are the significant implications of this legislation?

  45. Start the Task • Read the text independently. • Write a quick summary of the bill and what implications it may have. You will have about 10 minutes to complete this task.

  46. How Did that Feel? • Turn and Talk with your partner. • What were you feeling during the task? • How effective do you think you were at completing the task? • What strategies did you try as you were reading this challenging text? You need to understand your own metacognition around reading in order to know how to help your students with theirs.