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  1. Group Intervention Review Meetings: Julie Walker Bend-La Pine Schools

  2. Is what WE are doing working?

  3. Expectations • Demonstrate good audience skills • Silence cell phones • Hold side conversations out of ear shot of others • Engage in active listening • Participate in discussions • Ask questions during work time • If you need a break, take one

  4. Session Purposes The participant will be able to: • Discuss the structured process used to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions • Explain the use of decision rules to place, intensify, and exit students from interventions • Analyze a sample case of an intervention group Anita Archer

  5. Session Outcomes • Be affirmed for your good practices. • Be reminded of things you used to do but forgot about. • See things that you already do, now use and can expand on. • See things that are new and you would like to try.

  6. Despite our strong efforts. . .

  7. Partners • The person with the next birthday is coffee, the other person is cream.

  8. Group Intervention meetings help decide if the cows are fed the right food

  9. Start with the Why Simon Sinek

  10. Purpose To determine which students are in need of interventions, decide what intervention best fits each student’s needs, coordinate the students’ reading program, determine the effectiveness of current interventions, and make decisions about whether to continue, discontinue, or change an intervention.

  11. Coordination

  12. CVCe Silent “e” Bossy “e” Super “e” Ninja “e”

  13. Teamwork!!!!

  14. Interventions are one part of the system that helps a student be successful. • The adults must coordinate and be explicit with the students how the parts of instructional day are connected. Is what WE are doing working?

  15. Talk Time • Coffee please answer the following question: • Review the purpose of the intervention review process. • Cream please answer the following question: • How does/can your team work together to coordinate the students’ program? • With extra time switch questions

  16. Start with the Why Simon Sinek

  17. Intervention Review Process Meetings must be structured to determine- Is what WE are doing working?

  18. Teaming is hard!! • Having strong and effective teams is the MOST DIFFICULT thing to pull together! • Who meets? • How do we organize meetings? • When do we meet? • Who completes the paperwork? • How do we communicate decisions? • How do we assess our systems?

  19. Who sits at the table? • Principal • LiteracyGuru/Title I • Grade level team • Special Education teacher • May also include • ELL teacher • School Psychologist • Teacher representatives from other grade levels • Paraprofessionals

  20. A solid agenda will. . . . . . guide your team’s decision making . . . keep you focused on decision rules . . . keep you solution focused . . . help to avoid storytelling

  21. Guiding Question

  22. Sample Agenda

  23. When Do We Meet?

  24. Who completes the paperwork?

  25. Notifying Parents

  26. Note taking

  27. Tracking Attendance

  28. System Check

  29. Talk Time Review the documents in the handouts • Cream please answer the following question: • Which components of a tracking and communication system do you believe are most essential? • Coffee please answer the following question: • What do you believe is the next piece of the tracking and communication system that your school should work on? • With extra time switch questions

  30. Start with the Why Simon Sinek

  31. Intervention Review Process Have a clear set of decision rules to determine- Is what we are doing working?

  32. Purposes of Data Based Decision Making • Is what WE are doing working? • Adjustments to Instructional Design • Time • Design • Delivery • Optimize System Variables • Standardization • Efficiency • Effectiveness

  33. Decision Rules Pause Analyze Respond

  34. Decision Rules • Decision rules guide how we decide if what WE are doing is working • Your decision rules create consistency across grade levels and schools • Determine how to intensify and individualize interventions • Standardizes process for eligibility decision making

  35. Key features of decision rules • National research - benchmarks and norms • Set the grade levels for the decision rules (K, 1-6) • Number of points below the aimline • Give direction if the data is highly variable • Trendline analysis • Duration of intervention /frequency of monitoring - Length of time in between meetings (6 to 8 weeks) • Define success

  36. Example from KCSD Change interventions when: • DIBELS progress monitoring indicates at least 3 consecutive data points below the aimline (after at least6 weeks of instruction) or the student has not met grade level ambitious growth targets (see Adequate Response to Intervention for ORF). • If data is highly variable (points are above and below the aimline), maintain the current intervention until a total of 6 data points have been collected. • Each time the intervention is changed, the aimlineshould be redrawn using the median of the 3 data points prior to the intervention change as the starting point for the new aimline (see Aimlines and Trendlines for Progress Monitoring). • Check the progress of the cohort group after each 6-week period to determine whether an individual student’s progress is significantly different from the cohort group.

  37. Example from BLP • Progress monitoring indicates 3 out of 4 data points over a 6 week period (20 intervention periods) are below the aim-line. Use the following guideline below: • If the data are highly variable, continue with the intervention for another 6 week period. • The new aim-line should be redrawn using the median of three data points prior to the intervention change. This will be starting point for the new aimline. • For ELL students, check the progress of the cohort group with same ELL level after a 6 each week period to determine if the individual student’s progress is significantly different from the group (see ELL protocol)

  38. Example from CCSD Change interventions when: • Progress monitoring indicates at least 3 consecutive data points below the aimline and the slope is flat or decreasing. • If the data are highly variable (points are above and below the aimline), maintain the current intervention until 6 data points have been collected, analyze aimline and trendline. Change intervention if the slope is flat or decreasing and the scores are below the aimline. • Each time the intervention is changed the aimline should be redrawn using the median of the three data points prior to the intervention changes as the starting pint for the new aimline • Check the progress of the cohort after each 8-week period to determine whether an individual student’s progress is significantly different from the cohort group.

  39. 6 0 5 0 4 0 3 0 2 0 1 0 D e c . J a n . F e b . M a r c h A p r i l M a y J u n e S c o r e s S c o r e s S c o r e s S c o r e s S c o r e s S c o r e s S c o r e s Pause • When a student has “X” number of points below the aimlinewe must pause and think. . . Aimline Chase

  40. RTI = TIR • TIR = Thinking Is Required • Decision rules are “trip wires” that tell us when to pause, analyze, respond as needed based on the bestthinking of the group.

  41. Talk Time • Coffee please answer the following question: • What are the key features of decision rules? How do the examples help you to understand decision rules? • Cream please answer the following question: • How would using these decision rules change the discussions at your meetings? • With extra time switch questions

  42. Analyze • Analyze group progress monitoring data • Analyze individual progress monitoring data • Analyze complementary data

  43. Analyze Data • Once the decision rule has triggered a pause, we analyze progress monitoring data

  44. Analyze Group Data • Analyze: Is it an individual or a cohort problem?

  45. Cohort Data Cohort Group Analysis: Students who have similar literacy programming: • Grade level • Intervention program • Time • ELD level

  46. 6 0 5 0 4 0 3 0 2 0 1 0 D e c . J a n . F e b . M a r c h A p r i l M a y J u n e S c o r e s S c o r e s S c o r e s S c o r e s S c o r e s S c o r e s S c o r e s Analyze Cohort Data Isaiah Mary Amy Chase

  47. 6 0 5 0 4 0 3 0 2 0 1 0 D e c . J a n . F e b . M a r c h A p r i l M a y J u n e S c o r e s S c o r e s S c o r e s S c o r e s S c o r e s S c o r e s S c o r e s Analyze Cohort Data Amy Isaiah Chase Mary

  48. Analyze Individual Data CWPM (goal 100) Accuracy (goal 95%) 72% 73% 90% 80% 82% 95% Is this intervention successful? • 47 • 50 • 39 • 55 • 57 • 53

  49. National Growth Rates: Reading *Fuchs et al (1993), **Fuchs & Fuchs (2004)