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YOUR LOGO PowerPoint Presentation

YOUR LOGO

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YOUR LOGO

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  1. YOUR LOGO Small Changes – BIG Results! What’s In A Carb? It isn’t just how many carbohydrates you eat that counts for a healthy diet, it’s which kind you choose. Nutritionally, carbscan range from super healthy to almost “useless”. A balanced diet contains a proper mix of carbohydrates, fat and protein. Together they give you the energy and the building blocks for maintenance and activity. There are two basic types of carbs: complex – which includes pasta, rice, breads, cereals, fruits and vegetables – and simple which include cookies, candy, soft drinks and pastries. The big health difference: Complex carbs tend to be rich in vitamins, minerals and often fiber. Simple ones tend to be mostly sugar and low in nutrients – but high in calories. Choose healthy carbohydrates and fiber sources, especially whole grains, for long lasting energy. In addition to being delicious and satisfying, whole grains are rich in phytochemicals and antioxidants, which help to protect against coronary heart disease, certain cancers, and diabetes. Include a variety of whole grains in your healthy diet, including whole wheat, brown rice, millet, quinoa, and barley. Experiment with different grains to find your favorites. Make sure you're really getting whole grains. Be aware that the words stone-ground, multi-grain, 100% wheat, or bran can be deceptive. Look for the words “whole grain” or “100% whole wheat” at the beginning of the ingredient list. In the U.S., check for the Whole Grain Stamps that distinguish between partial whole grain and 100% whole grain. Try mixing grains as a first step to switching to whole grains. If whole grains like brown rice and whole wheat pasta don’t sound good at first, start by mixing what you normally use with the whole grains. You can gradually increase the whole grain to 100%. Avoid: Refined foods such as breads, pastas, and breakfast cereals that are not whole grain. TIP: Be aware of the calories associated with some of the new “low-carb” products . More than 1,000 low-carb products were introduced in 2003, but the FDA has yet to publish any guidelines as to what “low carb” really means. Instead, many new “low carb” foods are to carb-cutting what “low fat” cookies were to fat-cutting: just a new way of pitching foods high in calories and low in nutrient value. In fact, Consumer Reports found that many packaged low-carb foods are actually higher in calories than their regular counterparts. {Your Company} Healthy Choices Sources: American Dietetic Association, 2007, “Clearing up Calorie Confusion,” www.eatright.org United States Department of Agriculture, 2007, “Food and Nutrient Database for Dietary Studies,” www.usda.gov