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Tudors, Stuarts, and the English Civil War

Tudors, Stuarts, and the English Civil War. Objectives. Describe the relations between Tudor monarchs and Parliament. Analyze how clashes between the Stuarts and Parliament ushered in a century of revolution.

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Tudors, Stuarts, and the English Civil War

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  1. Tudors, Stuarts, and the English Civil War

  2. Objectives • Describe the relations between Tudor monarchs and Parliament. • Analyze how clashes between the Stuarts and Parliament ushered in a century of revolution. • Understand how the English Civil War and the development of the Commonwealth led to the Glorious Revolution. • Explain the development of English constitutional government.

  3. Terms and People • James I – the first Stuart monarch, who repeatedly clashed with Parliament • dissenters – Protestants who differed with the Church of England • Puritans – a group of dissenters who sought to “purify” the church of Catholic practices • Charles I– a Stuart monarch who inherited the throne in 1625 and dissolved Parliament, and then fought the English Civil War against it

  4. How did the British Parliament assert its rights against royal claims to absolute power in the 1600s? England took a different path than France did in the 1600s. Though English rulers attempted to increase their authority, Parliament expanded its own influence.

  5. Tudor monarchs Henry VIII and Elizabeth I worked with Parliament to rule England. Both sought approval from Parliament, even as they worked to control it. As a result, Parliament became accustomed to being consulted. In fact, Elizabeth’s skill at handling Parliament helped make her a popular ruler, who came to be known as “Good Queen Bess.”

  6. Harmony between the monarchy and Parliament ended with the Stuarts. Elizabeth died childless. The throne went to James Stuart, king of Scotland. James Iclashed with Parliament. Though he promised to rule by English custom, he tried to assert divine right.

  7. James was finally forced to call Parliament when he needed money. • However, when Parliament wanted to discuss foreign policy before voting funds, he dissolved Parliament and collected taxes on his own. • James also clashed withdissenters, especially Puritans, who wanted to “purify” the church. Like his father, he behaved like an absolute monarch and dissolved Parliament in 1629. His son Charles I inherited the throne in 1625.

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