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The importance of metaphors and paradigms for wetland conservation

The importance of metaphors and paradigms for wetland conservation

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The importance of metaphors and paradigms for wetland conservation

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  1. The importance of metaphors and paradigms for wetland conservation Anthropogenic activities – impacts < anthropocentrism = using natural resources, but detaching ourselves from Nature Delivery of ecosystem services, use of natural capital etc. signal a strong focus on human needs and wants Stereotypes and fears of dangerous / wild creatures and places reinforce this otherness: “Nature is out there, often far” vs “we humans are part of interconnected web of life”

  2. What about ecosystem relationships? Environmental flow research discusses water flows to ecosystems for the benefit of other organisms Ecosystem relationships and connectedness are often depicted with humans as the final user of the services that nature provides  6. Is there a goal in what nature does for humans? Or we should increase our appreciation of the existence value?

  3. Wetlands ≠ wastelands infested with dangerous creatures

  4. 1) Wetlands are still seen by many, with some reason, as wastelands and dangerous swamps infested by bugs, invasive snakes, and people that is best not to encounter.   Myths on swamp monsters • Slimy Slim AKA Sharlie, huge serpentine water-beast (Idaho, since 2002) • Lizard Man of Scape Ore Swamp(South Carolina) • Rougarou/ Loup-Garou (Cajun folklore - Louisiana) • The Loveland Frog (Ohio) • The Honey Island Swamp Monster (Lousiana) • (http://www.history.co.uk/shows/cryptid-the-swamp-beast/articles/5-american-swamp-beast-legends)

  5. 2) Algae ≠ toxic blooms! “Too much of anything is bad” • Not all algae form toxins • T. Paracelsus principle: “All things are poison and nothing is without poison, only the dosage makes a thing not poison” • Not all algal blooms are toxic • Algae as producers of some 50% of the oxygen humans breathe • Science communication can make wetlands and algae, among other topics, mainstream highlighting their positive attributes is required. St. Lucie River in Stuart -http://www.miamiherald.com http://news.nationalgeographic.com/

  6. Algae & art: a marriage made in water! David Williamson’sdrawings of the Okavango desmids Euastrumspinulosum Cosmarium pachidermum Micrasteriastropica Xavier Cortada Staurastrum prox. sebaldi

  7. Diatom of the month: http://floridacoastaleverglades.blogspot.com *10 posts: > 1,000 people reached on Facebook and > 7,000 impressions on Twitter*

  8. Ecosystem Services & Natural Capital: two in-fashion concepts "‘Natural capital’ is the stock (living and non-living components in the environment), while… …‘ecosystem services’ are the flows of benefits that are derived from this stock. The difference is, therefore, between assetsand the goods and servicesthat are produced from those assets. http://www.naturalcapitalinitiative.org.uk/about/

  9. Some questions for you “Do you view ES and NC as predominantly anthropocentric or predominantly ecocentric concepts?” + “Do you think that ES and NC are used and applied by a) other scientists, b) policy makers & stakeholders, as predominantly anthropocentric or predominantly ecocentric concepts?” “Do you think that the current literature on ecosystem services does or doesn’t sufficiently account for diverse cultural views of the relationship between humans and nature?” (e.g. relationship / kinship / belonging etc.) “Do you think that there is a need for improving / reframing the ES and NC concepts to account for cultural views of the relationship between humans and nature that may not be well represented in the current formulations?” 4. “How would you recommend (working towards) improving / reframing the ES and NC concepts?” “Would you recommend the international community of ecologists to adopt / use more any other phrases (new or already used) than ES and NC? If so, why?”

  10. In this phase of history do we need more Ecocentrism or more Anthropocentrism? To what extent can we manage ecosystems vs can we let nature run its course? Can we find a mixed balance?