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Windows 8.1

Windows 8.1

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Windows 8.1

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  1. Windows 8.1 David F. Soll Chief Technology Officer Omicron Development LLC dsoll@omicron.com

  2. Agenda • Introduction • Genealogy • Editions • Windows 8 Overview • Metro • Start Menu • Demonstration • Conclusions

  3. Introduction • Presenter: David F. Soll • President and Chief Technology Officer, Omicron Development • Vice Chair, PCJS IEEE • Past Chair, Princeton/Central NJ IEEE Computer Society • Senior Member of the IEEE • Recipient of the IEEE Region 1 Award • Past Chair, Princeton Chapter of the ACM • Senior Member of the ACM • Chair, TCF IT Professional Conference • Over 30 years in computing

  4. Genealogy • Windows 1.x, 2.x, /286, /386 • Never a commercial “hit” • Windows 3.0, 3.1, and 3.11 • 16 bit, ran on top of MS-DOS • Windows NT 3.1 and 3.5 • First 32 bit Windows not reliant on MS-DOS • Runs utilizing protected mode of the processor • Windows 95, 98, and ME • 16 bit, still reliant on MS-DOS • Windows 2000 • Next generation of Windows NT • Both Server and Workstation • Windows XP • Built from Windows 2000 • Workstation only O/S • Windows Server 2003 • Server only platform built with Windows XP & 2000 base • Windows Vista • Built from Windows XP & Server 2003 • Major security changes from XP and Server 2003 • Many Look and Feel Changes • Windows Server 2008 • Server only platform built from Windows Server 2003 and Windows Vista • Windows 7 • Built from Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008 • Improvements to UAC and other security mechanisms • Windows Server 2008 R2 • Based on Windows 7, server only O/S • Windows 8 • Built from Windows 7 • Borrows from Windows Phone O/S • Windows Server 2012 • Based on Windows 8 • Uses the same start screen as Win 8 • Windows 8.1 • Based on Windows 8 with minor improvements • Windows Server 2012 R2 • Similar enhancements as Windows 8.1

  5. Windows 8.1 Editions • Windows 8.1 • Windows 8.1 Pro • Windows 8.1 Enterprise • Windows RT 8.1 • Note: Unlike Windows Vista and Windows 7, there are no Starter, Home Basic, Home Premium, or Ultimate editions.

  6. Differences in Editions

  7. Windows Upgrade Path Note: Upgrades from cross architecture are not supported (i.e.: From 32 bit to 64 bit)

  8. Windows 8.1 Overview • Unified Operating System for: • PCs • Tablets • Smart Phones • New User Interface Design • “Touch First” • Two Versions: • Windows 8.1 • Supports Intel/AMD (x86 and x64) • Windows RT 8.1 • Supports ARM (Advanced RISC Machine - 32 bit processor)

  9. New Windows API (Win RT) • Windows NT through 7 uses Win32 API • Old style programming model • Win RT uses a new Object Oriented Programming model • New style programming model • Windows RT 8.1 only supports Win RT • Windows 8.1 supports both Win RT and Win 32

  10. Windows Store App Style • New style of applications called Store App style applications using Modern UI • Code named “Metro” style • No longer called Metro due to legal issues • App Store Style Applications do NOT window • They have 2 modes: • Full screen • Snapped Mode (side by side) • Snapped mode requires 1366 x 768 or higher resolution • Store Apps use Win RT

  11. Store App vs. Traditional • Traditional apps are windowed • Store Apps take over the whole desktop • Traditional applications live within the legacy desktop • Store Apps have their own display space (they take up the whole desktop) • All apps participate in the application rotation (i.e.: Alt-tab and Windows-tab) including the desktop itself • Store App icons (well, they’re not really icons, they call them “tiles”) can be “live” • Store Apps use Win RT, Traditional Apps use Win 32 • Traditional apps have “chrome”, Store apps don’t

  12. New UI • New Desktop Experience: Modern UI • Originally appeared on Windows Phone 7 Operating System • Provides an easy to use interface for touch screens (such as tablets and smart phones) • Can switch to classic mode via registry edit • New Internet Explorer (actually 2 of them) • Dedicated Modern UI version • No add-in • No tabs • Application Style • Similar to current IE experience

  13. Other New Features • Multi-touch Gestures • Store • SkyDriveOneDrive • Snap • Charms • File History • When installing, if connected to the internet • Windows tries to use your Microsoft Live account

  14. Updated Desktop Apps • Some of the desktop has been improved • Windows Explorer now has a ribbon • New Math Input Panel • Not very useful on a desktop • Many new or rewritten re-written in Store App • Mail • People • Messaging • Calendar • Maps • Weather • Music • Photos • Video • Camera • SkyDrive • News • Travel • Finance • Store • Internet Explorer

  15. Who Stole the Start Menu? • The Start Menu has been replaced • Windows 8 has no start button • Windows 8.1 adds it back • Now, the start menu is a full screen interface • The start screen doesn’t look like a menu • Supports a search • Segregates the results (apps, settings, files, etc.) • Shows Store Apps differently than legacy • Supports a “Show all apps” (right click) • Also supports a show shrunken menu (click at bottom right)

  16. How do you shut down? • 3 Ways: • Press the power button • Use the settings “Charm” • Right-click on the Start Menu button

  17. Demonstration

  18. Review of Windows 8 • IEEE Spectrum Magazine published an article interviewing software guru Jakob Nielsen and his review of Windows 8 (http://spectrum.ieee.org/podcast/computing/software/is-windows-8s-lack-of-windows-a-mistake/?utm_source=computerwise&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=121212) • Nielsen Concluded: “Windows 8 is week on tablets, terrible on PCs” (http://blogs.computerworld.com/windows/21357/interface-design-guru-windows-8-weak-tablets-terrible-pcs) • Neilsen tested Windows 8 by having 12 experienced users try Windows 8 on both PCs and Surface RT tablets

  19. Nielsen Review (cont’d.) • Users have to learn and remember where to go for which features. • When running web browsers in both device areas, users will only see (and be reminded of) a subset of their open web pages at any given time. • Switching between environments increases the interaction cost of using multiple features. • The two environments work differently, making for an inconsistent user experience.“ • One of the worst aspects of Windows 8 for power users is that the product's very name has become a misnomer. "Windows" no longer supports multiple windows on the screen.

  20. Nielsen Review (cont’d.) • Icons are supposed to (a) help users interpret the system, and (b) attract clicks. Not the Win8 icons. • As a result of the Surface's incredibly low information density, users are relegated to incessant scrolling to get even a modest overview of the available information. • The underlying problem is the idea of recycling a single software UI for two very different classes of hardware devices. It would have been much better to have two different designs: one for mobile and tablets, and one for the PC.

  21. Conclusions • The new Store App interface is good for phones and tablets but may not be optimal for a laptop or a desktop • Basic underlying functionality is still Windows 7 based (plus the Win RT infrastructure) • The fast boot is amazing • The lack of Windowing for Store Apps is puzzling

  22. Windows 8.1 David F. Soll Chief Technology Officer Omicron Development LLC dsoll@omicron.com This presentation is available at: http://home.comcast.net/~soll/