FY02 ASA Presentation Operate Emergency Communication Center - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

fy02 asa presentation operate emergency communication center n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
FY02 ASA Presentation Operate Emergency Communication Center PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
FY02 ASA Presentation Operate Emergency Communication Center

play fullscreen
1 / 93
Download Presentation
FY02 ASA Presentation Operate Emergency Communication Center
102 Views
dahlia-rice
Download Presentation

FY02 ASA Presentation Operate Emergency Communication Center

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. FY02 ASA Presentation Operate Emergency Communication Center Presented by: G. Borden G. Elliott, G. Harris, L. Martinez, M. Sheelor Office of Research Services National Institutes of Health 18 November 2002

  2. Table of Contents Main Presentation ASA Template ……………………………….……………………………….4 Customer Perspective……………………….……………………………….5 Customer Segmentation …………………….……………………………………6 Customer Satisfaction……………………….…………………………………….7 Unique Customer Measures………………….…………………………………..8 Internal Business Process Perspective…………………………………….9 Service Group Block Diagram…………………………………………………..10 Conclusions from Discrete Services Deployment Flowcharts……………….11 Process Measures………………………………………………………………..12 Learning and Growth Perspective………………………………………….13 Conclusions from Turnover, Sick Leave, Awards, EEO/ER/ADR Data……..14 Analysis of Readiness Conclusions…………………………………………….15 Unique Learning and Growth Measures………………………………………..16 Financial Perspective………………………………………………………..17 Unit Cost……………………………………………………………………………18 Asset Utilization……………………………………………………………………19 Unique Financial Measures..……………………………………………………..20 Conclusions and Recommendations……………………………………….21 Conclusions from FY02 ASA..……………………………………………………22 Recommendations…………………………………………………………………23

  3. Table of Contents Appendices Page 2 of your ASA Template Customer segments graphs Customer satisfaction graphs Block diagram Process maps Process measures graphs Learning and Growth graphs Analysis of Readiness Information

  4. ASA TEMPLATE

  5. What are we about? • We handle over 4,800 telephone calls per month • Responsible for over 32 line on the telephone system • Monitor 17 CCTV’s w/over 120 images of the NIH campus • Monitor 24 alarm devices and the fire alarm system • Make over 50,000 National Crime Information Center (FBI – NCIC) inquiries • Criminal and employment Background checks • Analyze stressful situations – 911 calls • The only Federal 911 center in the DC area. • Three shifts • 3 personnel midnights, 3 personnel mid-shift, and 5 personnel including supervisor on the day shift • TTY service for the hearing challenged

  6. If we are not handling Emergencies, What? Types of Non-Emergency Calls Received • Employee building access • Parking complaints • Ticket complaints • Directions to NIH • Events/Employment information • Complaints on parking meters • Calls for officers, administrative staff, ECC personnel • Lost & Found • Disable d vehicles • Citizens locked out of their vehicles

  7. Customer Perspective

  8. OUR CUSTOMERS • ECC’s prime customer is the Police Branch of which we are an integral part • NOTE: We concentrated on Police/Fire as customers with the idea that the NIH community is the ultimate customer

  9. CCTV Monitoring: DS2 • From May – October 02 – Two incidents • CCTV’s are providing crime deterrence • Increased security & CCTV’s has decreased crime

  10. FY02 ORS Customer Scorecard Data for the Annual Self Assessments Service Group 13: Operate Emergency Communication Center 16 October 2002 Summary Prepared by the Office of Quality Management (OQM)

  11. Survey Distribution Number of Surveys Distributed Emergency Communication Center 50 Number of Surveys Returned Emergency Communication Center 17 Response Rate 34%

  12. Survey RespondentsFY02 Respondents by IC

  13. Radar ChartFY02 Product/Service Satisfaction Ratings Note: The rating scale ranges from 1 - 10 where “1” represents Unsatisfactory and “10” represents Outstanding. Refer to the Data Analysis and Graphing training for advice on interpreting these results.

  14. Radar Chart InterpretationsProduct/Service • Comparison of ORS & ECC Product/Service Satisfaction ratings • ECC’s overall score is slightly below ORS index (ORS 8.27 vs. ECC 6.53), with ECC’s reliability the lowest of four categories (reliability, cost, timeliness, and quality) • Lack of formal training may be an issue in providing correct information or response • Ratings may reflect continuing difficulties in communication between Fire Department and ECC • ECC cost score is slightly below ORS (7.42 vs. ECC 7.33) however cost in ECC is the highest rated category • Respondents think ECC is a pretty good value

  15. Radar ChartFY02 Customer Service Satisfaction Ratings Service Group Index = 6.81 Availability 7.59 10.00 7.00 Handling of 4.00 Responsiveness Problems 7.06 6.29 1.00 Competence Convenience 5.82 7.31 Data based on 17 respondents Note: The rating scale ranges from 1 - 10 where “1” represents Unsatisfactory and “10” represents Outstanding. Refer to the Data Analysis and Graphing training for advice on interpreting these results.

  16. Comparison of ORS & ECC Customer Service Satisfaction ratings • Compared to ORS customer service satisfaction ratings, ECC is slightly below (ORS 8.55 vs. ECC 6.81) with ECC’s competence the lowest rating of 5 categories (reliability, handling of problems, responsiveness, convenience, competence). • The percentage of mistakes is miniscule, but the consequences are major • The only ways to reduce the number of mistakes further are (a) to provide additional training for employees and (b) to provide more staff – rushed call takers make mistakes

  17. Scatter DiagramFY02 Customer Importance and Satisfaction Ratings Note: The Importance rating scale ranges from 1 - 10 where “1” represents Unimportant and “10” represents Important. The Satisfaction rating scale ranges from 1 - 10 where “1” represents Unsatisfactory and “10” represents Outstanding.

  18. Scatter DiagramFY02 Customer Importance and Satisfaction Ratings: A Closer Look Note: A smaller portion of the chart is shown so that the individual data points can be labeled.

  19. Scatter Diagram Interpretation • The Police & Fire Branches believe availability and convenience are very important. • Cost does not appear to be a major factor for satisfaction. • It is interesting to note that better handling of problems would contribute greatly to improved customer satisfaction. • Again, we need to invest in more training and additional staff.

  20. These are some of the survey’s comments of what was done particularly well? • One or two dispatchers are competent to handle duties required. The rest need improvement. • Checking on building alarms in and out of service. • Keeping track of officers is usually done very well. • Good service. • All phases of dispatch and communication services are performed exceptionally well. • The new supervisor of ECC has improved the quality of ECC services and relationships with the customers.

  21. Returned Survey Comments of what needs to be improved? • Need to place lead dispatches on all shifts. All of them work day work. • Timing. • ECC needs to follow proper command structure, in other words, dispatchers need to stop placing themselves in the role of supervisor, which they are not. • How key dispatch calls. • Better dispatchers, people that understand police/fire/rescue operations. Dispatchers that speak clear English, dispatchers that are competent. • Quality and competency of ECC staff, more staff, better scheduling so "NO" police officers have to fill in. Repeaters for al 3 channels for better communications on and off campus. • The whole system. • Speed/accuracy of NCIC for officers for some dispatchers. • Nothing to complain about at this time. • Better equipment.

  22. Other Comments • All dispatchers need official training before being assigned to dispatch center. Formal training should be conducted by full time trainers, off campus if need be. • Keep training. • Day crew is very reliability, and responsive but nights and weekends are very shady and fly by night. Feel can not rely on them. • ECC definitely needs to improve quality and performance of dispatchers since NIH police and fire respond to life threatening situations! • Better dispatchers, better training, better quality assurance, and review. • Sent your staff to a ECC that works with real Emergency every day to get them real training. • The quality of dispatching changes between operations/shifts and by work load. I believe they all try very hard doing their best.

  23. To Summarize: Increased Customer Satisfaction depends on • Quality – customer satisfaction training • Reliability – work toward “Industry Standards” • Timeliness – constant scenario drills • Competence – better hiring practices • Handling of problems – training issues • More staff – tired and rushed dispatchers make mistakes

  24. Recommendations • Improve pay & benefits to attract high quality personnel • Have a panel of ECC/Fire personnel interview prospective recruits the interviewing to improve selection process • Structure probationary period – 12-week training to screen out less-successful recruits • Dispatcher Certification • Formal “IN-SERVICE’ program • Training in competence areas • (i.e., customer service, proper dispatching procedures)

  25. Internal Business Process Perspective

  26. Relationship between Service Group and Discrete Services • NIH ECC is the only Federal ECC to establish an enhanced 911 Emergency Communication Center in the DC area • ECC is the focal point between the Police, Fire, and NIH community • ECC answers emergency and non-emergency calls, analyze stressful situations, monitor approx. 130 CCTV’s, monitor Door Alarm Devise, and Fire Alarms. • ECC utilizes the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s National Crime Information Center (NCIC) for investigation purposes

  27. Conclusions from Discrete Services Deployment Flowcharts • Our Service Group completed 3 deployment flowcharts for 3 discrete services • We have learned from the deployment flowcharts • Overall view of total process from requester to completed actions • Shows sequence of events • Each chart shows a strong symbiotic relationship between ECC, Police & fire (I.e., maintain radio contact for personal safety • Shows area of improved training needs (i.e., obtain relevant information from requester) • Shows no outstanding signals

  28. Process Measures • Process measures for each discrete service • DS1: Operate ECC • Total calls received in ECC 2002 • Average time to dispatch a call • Actual average monthly overtime • DS2: Monitor CCTV equipment • Relatively new DS measurement – established a baseline for future measures (2.8 hours 24/7) • DS3: Respond to NCIC requests • Total number of requests per year • Relatively new DS measurement - established baseline for future measures

  29. Average Time To Dispatch A Call in Minutes Control Chart • Within limits: No major signals

  30. 911 Control Chart

  31. Total Calls Received In The Emergency Communications Center June 2001 – June 2002 Non-Emergency 84,693, BlP 11,868, Emergency 8,535 Total 84,693 76% Non-Emergency 14% Blue Light Phone 10% Emergency

  32. Process Measure Findings • Beginning month 40-60 hours • mandated OT because of high security – out side influence • Emergency incoming calls (approx. 11% of total calls) are within the control process • Average time to dispatch a call is between 4-5 minutes • Training issues with the update version of CAD system

  33. FY02 Learning and Growth (L&G) Data for the Annual Self Assessments Service Group 13: Operate Emergency Communications Center 26 September 2002 Summary Prepared by the Office of Quality Management

  34. Learning and Growth Data Table 1 ER case out of 7 employees 14% employee turnover About 1 award for every 2 employees About 2 days sick leave per employee

  35. Interpreting ECC’s Data • Group Turnover Rate • ECC is slightly below average • Average Hours of Sick leave Use • ECC is below average • Average Number of Awards Received • ECC is slightly below average • Average Number of EEC Complaints • None • Average Number of ER Cases • One case in 2001

  36. Summary of ECC’ Learning and Growth Data • Fourteen percent employee turnover • About 2 days of sick leave used per employee • About one award for every 2 employees • No ECC complaints for the year 2002 • Fourteen percent Employee Resolution cases (actually only one case in 2001) • Average number of ADR Cases - None

  37. Conclusions from Turnover, Sick Leave, Awards, EEO/ER/ADR Data • Group Turnover Rate • Fourteen percent • Out of 32 SG’s ECC ranks slightly below the 50 percentile with 50% being the mean • Average Hours of Sick Leave Used • With 35 hours as an average, ECC is below average with 18% This is an indication that Sick Leave is not being abused • Average Number of Awards Received • ECC is slightly below average. Improvement is needed • Note: NIH in general needs to improve awards program

  38. Conclusions Continued • Average Number of EEC Complaints • None – This indicates an adherence to the rules and policies concerning EEC practices • Average Number of ER Cases • One case in 2001 which gives 14% • As compared with other SG’s, ECC was slightly above the the average of .12 (ECC .14) • Note: ECC is in the process of formulating a Union, thus, another means to address ER issues. • Average Number of ADR Cases • None – ECC mgt & employees are working to resolve issues

  39. Financial Perspective

  40. Financial Findings: Overtime • Trend !!! • Until ECC reach “Full” staffing, OT costs will remain a part of the “normal” operating procedure. • ECC is utilizing approximate 20% OT • This equates to 2.82 FTE’s • Avg. Salary $38,314 • $38,314 X 11 (number of FTE’s) = $421,450 (straight time) • Avg. OT hours $27.63 X 904.50 hours (total number of OT used) = $107881 • Straight Sal $421450 & OT Sal 107881 = $529331 (total personnel cost) • $107881/38314 = 2.82 • 2/82 X $38,314 = $107881 • Hiring 3 additional personnel could be a break-even point

  41. Asset Utilization Measures • Activity difficult to measure in terms of standard outputs. • How do you measure standby? • Quess-timate 10% non-productive • Through observations • Asset Utilization 90% • Max input 11X1840 = 20240 • Non-productive input 2025 (10%) • Asset utilization 18216/20240 • Asset utilization 90% • Note: 10% can be used for additional training needs

  42. Analysis of Readiness Conclusions: What is Needed • The right mix of skills & abilities • Interpersonal skill, communication abilities (I.e., verbal, written), decision making abilities, technical know-how, analytical skill, ability to multi-task, physical • In the next three years ECC is expected to expand its digital CCTV to cover off-campus • There is a need for operational training (i.e. Weapons of Mass Destruction, Handling Bomb Threats, etc) • The right tools needed to carry out the mission are technological updates (i.e., MAAARS-View – shows location of incoming 911, DIAPHONE – records the into ing call, ANDOVER – UPDATES FOR BUILDING ACDCESS, CCTV) • At this point, budget concerns come into play