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Graduate Certificate in Global Security Studies

Graduate Certificate in Global Security Studies

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Graduate Certificate in Global Security Studies

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  1. Graduate Certificate in Global Security Studies Brandon Prins Political Science UTK

  2. Purpose of Certificate Program • Training • Increase understanding of salient security issues, such as the proliferation of nuclear weapons and fissile material, terrorism, and arms control • Increase understanding of the U.S. political system, especially U.S. national security institutions, but also the important relationship between the Executive and Legislative branches of the U.S. government • Increase understanding of policy process and bureaucratic decision-making • Increase understanding of the drivers of violent conflict, both inter-state and intra-state

  3. Purpose of Certificate Program, cont. • Research • Facilitate studies of violent conflict, insurgency, terrorism, and connections between arms proliferation and violence. • Explore conditions that support disarmament • Explore demand-side of nuclear weapons programs and how such programs influence rivalry and regional security • Executive-legislative relations • Bureaucratic policy implementation • Connect research to policy development

  4. Purpose of Certificate Program, cont. • Public Outreach • Increase the public’s awareness of security, proliferation, and arms control issues • Support Baker Center workshops, conferences, and meetings on security issues

  5. Demand for Certificate Program • Other Similar Programs • Maryland (PGSD) • Princeton (PSGS) • Johns Hopkins • Texas A&M (Bush School) • Who will benefit from this program? • Current Political Science graduate students that desire expertise in security affairs • Professionals that work in government or security that desire career advancement • Graduate students in physical sciences or engineering that desire training in policy, government, & international politics

  6. Program Specifics • Training and expertise in global security issues, such as arms control, weapons proliferation, terrorism, and U.S. national security institutions • Analytical tools to critically evaluate threats to U.S. and global security • Develop social science skills to model threats

  7. Program Specifics, cont. • 15 semester hour (5 course) non-degree program • Core seminars • Two basic tracks • National Security Institutions • Conflict Processes

  8. Program Specifics, cont. • Students take 2 of 4 core seminars • Students choose track 1 or track 2 • Students take 3 additional seminars in track chosen

  9. Courses • Core Seminars • International Politics (PS 580) • Foundations of Security Studies (new course) • War, Peace, & Grand Strategy (new course) • Public Policy Process (PS 548) • U.S. Government (PS 530)

  10. Courses, cont. • Track 1: National Security Institutions • Theory & Analysis of U.S. Foreign Policy (PS 682) • Congress & National Security Policy (new course) • Defense Policy (new course) • Arms Control & Non-proliferation (PS 688) • Congress (533) • Presidency (PS 532)

  11. Courses, cont. • Track 2: Conflict Processes • Violent Inter-state Conflict (PS 688) • Political Violence, Insurgency, and Civil War (new course) • Politics of Terrorism (new course) • Military Strategy & National Security Policy (new course)

  12. Hypothetical Program Schedule • Fall • Foundations of War & Peace • Plus 1 Track 1 Seminar & 1 Track 2 Seminar • Spring • PS 580 (IR Theory) • Plus 1 Track 1 Seminar & 1 Track 2 Seminar • Summer • One core seminar • Plus 1 Track 1 Seminar & 1 Track 2 Seminar

  13. Need for Internships • Assists in professional development • Enables a refinement of career goals • Bush School has a director of career services that facilitates internships • Bush School partners with many federal, state, private-sector, and non-governmental organizations • CIA, FBI, State, Homeland Security • OAS, American Red Cross • CSIS, World Bank, Stratfor

  14. Comparisons with Other Programs • Johns Hopkins • 5 course National Security Certificate • 2 Tracks (Foreign Policy & Science) • Maryland • Non-degree programs housed with Department of Government and Politics • Princeton • Non-degree program within the Woodrow Wilson School • Texas A&M • 4 course National Security Affairs Certificate • MPIA with Tracks in international economics and national security

  15. Current Political Science Faculty • Brandon Prins • PhD Michigan State 1999 • Conflict processes • Foreign policy • Methodology • David Brulé • PhD Texas A&M 2006 • Foreign policy • Conflict processes • Methodology • Wonjae Hwang • PhD Michigan State , 2004 • Political economy& Globalization • Conflict processes • Methodology

  16. Recap

  17. Preliminary Budget Needs • Staff • ~25-35k per year • Faculty Resources • Summer  ~16k per year • Fall  ~30k per year • Spring  ~30k per year • Graduate Student Funding • Two TA lines at 15k each  ~30k per year • Total Cost = ~130-150k per year

  18. Example of Current Research on Nuclear Proliferation

  19. Demand-Side of Nuclear Weapons • Cirincione & Sagan • Security • Prestige • Domestic Politics • Technology

  20. Demand-Side of Nuclear Weapons • Sagan • Security over-emphasized as driver of nuclear weapons • Cases • India (domestic politics) • South Africa (Technology and Prestige) • France (Prestige) • Ukraine (New Prestige of giving up nukes) • Role of NPT • Increase states’ confidence about limits of adversaries’ nuclear weapons programs • Tool to empower domestic actors who are opposed to development of nukes

  21. Empirical Evidence Related to Sources of Demand for Nuclear Weapons • Economic development increases probability of exploring, pursuing, and acquiring nukes • But only for poorer countries • Increases in per capita GDP actually decreases probability of exploring, pursuing, and acquiring nukes for richest states • Dispute involvement increases probability of all 3 • Great power alliances decrease probability of all 3 • Democracy increases probability of all 3 • Economic openness decreases probability of all 3

  22. Empirical Evidence Related to Sources of Demand for Nuclear Weapons • Countries that should have gone nuclear (high hazards, but no programs) • Saudi Arabia  1980s-1990s • W. Germany  1950s-1960s • Japan  1950s-1960s • Turkey  1960s-current • Bulgaria  1960s-1970s • Spain  1950s-1970s • Italy  1950s-1960s • Syria  various periods

  23. Empirical Evidence Related to Sources of Demand for Nuclear Weapons • Countries that should not have (low hazards but programs) • Libya • Brazil • Algeria • Pakistan