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Classroom Assessment Scoring System CLASS

Classroom Assessment Scoring System CLASS

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Classroom Assessment Scoring System CLASS

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    1. Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS) An Overview for Florida What to Know Beginning with this slide, you will begin sharing the UCF program as teachers will see it. For this session (session 1, UCF Overview), you will model facilitating the session for your participants. During the subsequent 3 sessions, your participants will have opportunities to practice facilitating the sessions with feedback from you. What to Know Beginning with this slide, you will begin sharing the UCF program as teachers will see it. For this session (session 1, UCF Overview), you will model facilitating the session for your participants. During the subsequent 3 sessions, your participants will have opportunities to practice facilitating the sessions with feedback from you.

    2. Overview of CLASS What is quality? What does CLASS measure? What does research using CLASS tell us about the quality of ECE programs? How is CLASS being used at large-scale for evaluation and quality improvement? Alignment with professional development supports Using CLASS with the ECERS Questions?

    3. Role of Quality in Educational Improvement Even as we invest in early childhood education, let's raise the bar for early learning programs that are falling short. Now, today, some children are enrolled in excellent programs. Some children are enrolled in mediocre programs. And some are wasting away their most formative years in bad programs....That's why I'm issuing a challenge to our states: Develop a cutting-edge plan to raise the quality of your early learning programs; show us how you'll work to ensure that children are better prepared for success by the time they enter kindergarten We will reward quality and incentivize excellence, and make a down payment on the success of the next generation." -Remarks by President Barack Obama at the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce on a Complete and Competitive American Education, March 10, 2009

    4. Complicating factors What is quality? How can we assess it in a way that will have the biggest impact on childrens development? How can we tie quality assessment/ monitoring into quality improvement?

    5. Structural Quality Quality improvement efforts have typically invested resources in structural quality indicators such as:

    6. Investing in interactions Research shows that although these structural features of quality are important they are linked to student outcomes through the ways in which they change teachers interactions with students (process quality).

    7. What is CLASS? An observational tool designed to measure effective teacher-child interactions Validated in over 3000 classrooms children in classrooms with higher CLASS scores show better academic and social development Linked to a set of validated professional development resources Used by the Office of Head Start as a monitoring tool as well as several states and cities as a part of quality improvement programs

    8. The CLASS Lens The Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS) lens offers these advantages: Reliable, validated measure Reflects the complexity of classrooms Provides a common language What to Say and Do The CLASS is one lens; it is not the only possible lens. The CLASS provides an objective measurement of classroom level variables (teacher-child interactions) that produce benefits for childrens development. Advantages to using the CLASS: It is reliable. The CLASS is standardized. Two people who are reliable on the CLASS will see the same things and arrive at the same scores while observing a classroom. It is valid. The CLASS has been used in several large studies, in thousands of pre-K classrooms, and it is associated with childrens academic and social development. It measures what it says it measures, which is teacher-child interactions that lead to childrens social and academic development. It is complex. It focuses on the key interaction-based aspects of classroom that we know are important. It can take a great deal of practice to learn to see classroom interactions through the CLASS lens. The complexity of the CLASS matches the complexity of classrooms. It provides a common language through which we can define and discuss the many types of quality teacher-child interactions that take place in the classroom everyday. What to Say and Do The CLASS is one lens; it is not the only possible lens. The CLASS provides an objective measurement of classroom level variables (teacher-child interactions) that produce benefits for childrens development. Advantages to using the CLASS: It is reliable. The CLASS is standardized. Two people who are reliable on the CLASS will see the same things and arrive at the same scores while observing a classroom. It is valid. The CLASS has been used in several large studies, in thousands of pre-K classrooms, and it is associated with childrens academic and social development. It measures what it says it measures, which is teacher-child interactions that lead to childrens social and academic development. It is complex. It focuses on the key interaction-based aspects of classroom that we know are important. It can take a great deal of practice to learn to see classroom interactions through the CLASS lens. The complexity of the CLASS matches the complexity of classrooms. It provides a common language through which we can define and discuss the many types of quality teacher-child interactions that take place in the classroom everyday.

    9. What to Say and Do Explain that the CLASS focuses on three broad domains of effective interactions that characterize childrens classroom experiences. Emotional Support - Positive relationships among teachers and children, teachers abilities to support social and emotional functioning in the classroom Classroom Organization - Well-managed classrooms that provide children with frequent, engaging learning activities Instructional Support - Interactions that teach children to think, provide ongoing feedback and support, and facilitate language development Tell teachers that each domain includes multiple dimensions of effective interactions known to contribute to childrens success in school. Let them know that you will look at each domain in detail in later slides.What to Say and Do Explain that the CLASS focuses on three broad domains of effective interactions that characterize childrens classroom experiences. Emotional Support - Positive relationships among teachers and children, teachers abilities to support social and emotional functioning in the classroom Classroom Organization - Well-managed classrooms that provide children with frequent, engaging learning activities Instructional Support - Interactions that teach children to think, provide ongoing feedback and support, and facilitate language development Tell teachers that each domain includes multiple dimensions of effective interactions known to contribute to childrens success in school. Let them know that you will look at each domain in detail in later slides.

    10. CLASS Domains & Dimensions What to Say and Do Explain that within the domains there are ten distinct dimensions that capture the different aspects of the domains. What to Say and Do Explain that within the domains there are ten distinct dimensions that capture the different aspects of the domains.

    11. Toddler Version What to Say and Do Explain that within the domains there are ten distinct dimensions that capture the different aspects of the domains. What to Say and Do Explain that within the domains there are ten distinct dimensions that capture the different aspects of the domains.

    12. How is the CLASS Organized? Refer to the structure in the manual diagram on page 32 Be sure to emphasize throughout training that we are looking for BOTH the presence or absence of behaviors specific to each of the dimensions. In the manual, there is a face page for each dimension that provides an overview of the dimension; there are also brief descriptors that provide an overview of behaviors associated with low, mid, and high range interactions for each indicator. The face page is ONLY a good first place to start/reference. When coding you should turn to the more descriptive pages to assign a code. Dont rely solely on this page or the laminated tri-fold that comes with the manual. Refer to the structure in the manual diagram on page 32 Be sure to emphasize throughout training that we are looking for BOTH the presence or absence of behaviors specific to each of the dimensions. In the manual, there is a face page for each dimension that provides an overview of the dimension; there are also brief descriptors that provide an overview of behaviors associated with low, mid, and high range interactions for each indicator. The face page is ONLY a good first place to start/reference. When coding you should turn to the more descriptive pages to assign a code. Dont rely solely on this page or the laminated tri-fold that comes with the manual.

    13. Emotional Support Domain What to Say and Do Point out that the dimensions within the CLASS domain of Emotional Support are Positive Climate, Negative Climate, Teacher Sensitivity and Regard for Student Perspectives. Positive Climate reflects the emotional connection, respect, and enjoyment demonstrated between teachers and children and among children. Negative Climate is not the absence of Positive Climate, but rather the presence of specific behaviors that express negativity in the classroom. Teacher Sensitivity reflects the teachers awareness of and responsiveness to childrens academic and emotional concerns. Regard for Student Perspectives reflects the degree to which classroom activities and interactions place an emphasis on childrens interests, motivations, and points of view. What to Say and Do Point out that the dimensions within the CLASS domain of Emotional Support are Positive Climate, Negative Climate, Teacher Sensitivity and Regard for Student Perspectives. Positive Climate reflects the emotional connection, respect, and enjoyment demonstrated between teachers and children and among children. Negative Climate is not the absence of Positive Climate, but rather the presence of specific behaviors that express negativity in the classroom. Teacher Sensitivity reflects the teachers awareness of and responsiveness to childrens academic and emotional concerns. Regard for Student Perspectives reflects the degree to which classroom activities and interactions place an emphasis on childrens interests, motivations, and points of view.

    14. Classroom Organization Domain What to Say and Do Point out that the three dimensions within the domain of Classroom Organization are Behavior Management, Productivity, and Instructional Learning Formats. Behavior Management refers to how teachers provide clear behavioral expectations and use effective methods to prevent and redirect misbehavior. Productivity looks at how a teacher manages instructional time and routines and provides activities so children have the opportunity to be involved in learning. Instructional Learning Formats focuses on what the teacher does to increase childrens interest, engagement, and abilities to learn from lessons and activities. What to Say and Do Point out that the three dimensions within the domain of Classroom Organization are Behavior Management, Productivity, and Instructional Learning Formats. Behavior Management refers to how teachers provide clear behavioral expectations and use effective methods to prevent and redirect misbehavior. Productivity looks at how a teacher manages instructional time and routines and provides activities so children have the opportunity to be involved in learning. Instructional Learning Formats focuses on what the teacher does to increase childrens interest, engagement, and abilities to learn from lessons and activities.

    15. Instructional Support Domain What to Know Instructional Support tends to be the most difficult domain to understand. What to Say and Do Point out that the three dimensions within the domain of Instructional Support are Concept Development, Quality of Feedback, and Language Modeling. Concept Development refers to how teachers promote childrens thinking skills and understanding both in moment-to-moment interactions and in lessons and activities. Quality of Feedback refers to how teachers expand childrens learning through their responses to childrens ideas, comments, and work. Language Modeling refers to the ways teachers facilitate and support childrens language development. What to Know Instructional Support tends to be the most difficult domain to understand. What to Say and Do Point out that the three dimensions within the domain of Instructional Support are Concept Development, Quality of Feedback, and Language Modeling. Concept Development refers to how teachers promote childrens thinking skills and understanding both in moment-to-moment interactions and in lessons and activities. Quality of Feedback refers to how teachers expand childrens learning through their responses to childrens ideas, comments, and work. Language Modeling refers to the ways teachers facilitate and support childrens language development.

    16. Research shows that levels of effective interactions vary greatly for children in early childhood education settings. What to Say and Do Tell teachers that you will now examine research studies about interactions in early childhood education settings. Explain to teachers that the levels of effective classroom interactions observed vary greatly, even among different classrooms that are at the same site or school. Researchers see the whole range from highly effective interactions to very ineffective interactions. The domains of Emotional Support and Classroom Organization are typically at moderate to high levels in early childhood education classrooms. Instructional Support, however, is typically at a low level. These findings have been replicated in several large national studies of early childhood education settings, including state pre-K, Head Start, and community-based child care centers. Children are also unlikely to receive consistent access to supportive classroom interactions that aid their social and academic learning as they move from one grade level to the next. Of 725 children followed from pre-K to kindergarten in a recent study, only 33% were placed in classrooms offering high levels of Emotional Support both years; the vast majority of children (60%) were in classrooms offering low levels of Instructional Support in both pre-K and kindergarten (La Paro, et al., in press). What to Say and Do Tell teachers that you will now examine research studies about interactions in early childhood education settings. Explain to teachers that the levels of effective classroom interactions observed vary greatly, even among different classrooms that are at the same site or school. Researchers see the whole range from highly effective interactions to very ineffective interactions. The domains of Emotional Support and Classroom Organization are typically at moderate to high levels in early childhood education classrooms. Instructional Support, however, is typically at a low level. These findings have been replicated in several large national studies of early childhood education settings, including state pre-K, Head Start, and community-based child care centers. Children are also unlikely to receive consistent access to supportive classroom interactions that aid their social and academic learning as they move from one grade level to the next. Of 725 children followed from pre-K to kindergarten in a recent study, only 33% were placed in classrooms offering high levels of Emotional Support both years; the vast majority of children (60%) were in classrooms offering low levels of Instructional Support in both pre-K and kindergarten (La Paro, et al., in press).

    17. What to Say and Do Explain that this graph shows how much the effectiveness of interactions varies. Explain to teachers that based on CLASS data collected from observing several thousand pre-k-3rd classrooms throughout the country, researchers know that Children tend to experience all, but mostly moderate to high, levels of effective interactions for Emotional Support and Classroom Organization. Most children attend pre-k-3rd grade classrooms characterized by low levels of instructional support. What to Say and Do Explain that this graph shows how much the effectiveness of interactions varies. Explain to teachers that based on CLASS data collected from observing several thousand pre-k-3rd classrooms throughout the country, researchers know that Children tend to experience all, but mostly moderate to high, levels of effective interactions for Emotional Support and Classroom Organization. Most children attend pre-k-3rd grade classrooms characterized by low levels of instructional support.

    18. Research shows that effective teacher-child interactions are key ingredients for childrens social and academic development. What to Say and Do Tell teachers that research shows that the differences in effective interactions are linked to how much children learn and grow in school. Point out that children in classrooms with higher CLASS ratings experience greater gains in academic achievement and social skill development during the school year: Classrooms in which teachers develop positive relationships with children and are sensitive to childrens needs (as measured by the CLASS domain Emotional Support) foster childrens social development. Classrooms in which teachers effectively manage behavior and take an active role in creating learning opportunities (as measured by the CLASS domain Classroom Organization) enhance childrens self-regulatory skills and help children get the most out of each day they spend in the classroom. Children in classrooms in which teachers offer higher quality feedback and more consistently support the development of thinking skills (as measured by the CLASS domain Instructional Support) show more academic progress in both pre-K and kindergarten than do their peers who receive lower levels of these supports. When early childhood education programs provide effective emotional, organizational and instructional supports, children are more successful learners and are more likely to meet expectations about what children should know and be able to do. Emphasize that the differences among classrooms has an impact on what children are able to get out of their school and early childhood education experiences. What to Say and Do Tell teachers that research shows that the differences in effective interactions are linked to how much children learn and grow in school. Point out that children in classrooms with higher CLASS ratings experience greater gains in academic achievement and social skill development during the school year: Classrooms in which teachers develop positive relationships with children and are sensitive to childrens needs (as measured by the CLASS domain Emotional Support) foster childrens social development. Classrooms in which teachers effectively manage behavior and take an active role in creating learning opportunities (as measured by the CLASS domain Classroom Organization) enhance childrens self-regulatory skills and help children get the most out of each day they spend in the classroom. Children in classrooms in which teachers offer higher quality feedback and more consistently support the development of thinking skills (as measured by the CLASS domain Instructional Support) show more academic progress in both pre-K and kindergarten than do their peers who receive lower levels of these supports. When early childhood education programs provide effective emotional, organizational and instructional supports, children are more successful learners and are more likely to meet expectations about what children should know and be able to do. Emphasize that the differences among classrooms has an impact on what children are able to get out of their school and early childhood education experiences.

    19. Predicting Pre-K Child Development What to Know This graph is based on National Center for Early Development & Learning (NCEDL) data on over 2000 children in about 700 pre-K classrooms. It shows levels of effective interactions, as measured by the CLASS, related to childrens learning gains over the pre-K year. This data is based on an early version of the CLASS that only included the Emotional and Instructional Support domains, so information related to Classroom Organization is not included as a separate domain in these analyses. ECERS-R was another way classroom quality was measured. It focuses heavily on structural quality and a little on process. What to Say and Do This graph shows that what researchers found in these preschool classrooms was that the CLASS Instructional Support dimensions in particular were associated with childrens language learning. As classrooms provided more effective interactions in the instructional support dimensions of the CLASS, children gained more receptive and expressive language skills over the course of the year, and they developed more early literacy skills (rhyming, letter naming). In addition, children developed early math skills. It was also found that when classrooms were characterized by interactions that provided more effective emotional support, childrens social competence increased more over the course of the pre-K year. What to Know This graph is based on National Center for Early Development & Learning (NCEDL) data on over 2000 children in about 700 pre-K classrooms. It shows levels of effective interactions, as measured by the CLASS, related to childrens learning gains over the pre-K year. This data is based on an early version of the CLASS that only included the Emotional and Instructional Support domains, so information related to Classroom Organization is not included as a separate domain in these analyses. ECERS-R was another way classroom quality was measured. It focuses heavily on structural quality and a little on process. What to Say and Do This graph shows that what researchers found in these preschool classrooms was that the CLASS Instructional Support dimensions in particular were associated with childrens language learning. As classrooms provided more effective interactions in the instructional support dimensions of the CLASS, children gained more receptive and expressive language skills over the course of the year, and they developed more early literacy skills (rhyming, letter naming). In addition, children developed early math skills. It was also found that when classrooms were characterized by interactions that provided more effective emotional support, childrens social competence increased more over the course of the pre-K year.

    20. Aligned Professional Development Supports Teachstone, a non-profit organization, offers empirically-tested professional development supports designed to improve the quality of teachers interactions with children Range from low to high intensity

    21. Range of CLASS-based Professional Development Offerings

    22. Video Library

    23. Use of CLASS at Scale Office of Head Start Monitoring Professional Development through TA Network Trained over 2000 people on CLASS in 2008-09 (75% passed the first reliability test) QRIS VA and Arizona City of Chicago Georgia quality improvement efforts

    24. Training At-Scale Regional trainings Train the Trainer program Intro programs for teachers and directors

    25. CLASS in Florida Number of CLASS Trainings in FL 2007 = 1 2008 = 4 2009 = 14 2010 = 14 Locations include: University of Miami University of Central Florida Broward County Schools University of South Florida University of Florida

    26. CLASS and ECERS

    27. Using CLASS and ECERS We strongly recommend using CLASS in all classrooms, not just those that meet certain threshold on ECERS All teachers and classrooms can use feedback and support to strengthen their interactions with children. The CLASS might help capture strengths that are not reflected on the ECERS-R and would not be noticed or addressed if CLASS scores were given only to programs scoring sufficiently high on the ECERS-R.

    28. Use of CLASS in Diverse Settings Research in 700 diverse pre-K classrooms 15% of the pre-k classrooms had 50% or more children of Limited English proficiency at the beginning of the year. 50% of pre-k classrooms had children who spoke Spanish. 21% of classrooms had children who spoke a language other than English or Spanish. Results indicate that children in classrooms with higher CLASS scores make greater academic and social progress, regardless of the childs individual language abilities or the language context of the classroom (e.g. number of DLL children). Because CLASS focuses on interactions, and has multiple behavioral indicators, it allows for assessment in a diverse range of classrooms Example of eye contact

    29. Adapting the CLASS The CLASS should be used in the same way across classroom settings. The dimensions should not be tailored in terms of coding to try to accommodate differences across settings, including the language or special needs of children. The CLASS is a standardized tool and this is one of its advantages. If modifications were made, it would be difficult to make comparisons within and across programs. Can be used with other tools to assess aspects not covered by CLASS

    30. CLASS in Other Languages Group at Harvard has just completed a Spanish version of CLASS, working with Brookes on publication As yet, no training materials available in Spanish

    31. CLASS and Curricula CLASS does not measure any specific curricula but is well-aligned with most early childhood curricula Teaching Strategies (Creative Curriculum) has incorporated CLASS into their coaching manual Research typically finds as much variability between teachers using the same curriculum as there is between teachers using different curriculum

    32. Final Thoughts Take time for thoughtful planning; stakeholder involvement is crucial to the development of effective systems of evaluation and teacher support that incorporate the CLASS. Invest time and resources in using the tool well. Invest in evaluations that can inform future program development. Document results that can be used to leverage support and resources from policymakers. There is no magic bullet be thoughtful about how the CLASS fits into the larger picture of quality improvement efforts. Continually work toward building an aligned system of evaluation and professional development.

    33. More Information & Questions For more information on CLASS please visit: www.classobservation.com Questions?