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Epidemiology in Action

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Epidemiology in Action

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  1. Epidemiology in Action Unit IV Understanding and Preventing Health and Safety Problems FINAL ACTIVITY: Putting It All Together

  2. Epidemiology in Action 2 The basic purpose of epidemiology is to help us understand and prevent a wide variety of health and safety problems. For example, as a result of epidemiological studies, we instituted a number of prevention and intervention programs that helped lower the rate of deaths from lung cancer. (And epidemiologists statistically showed that these programs had an effect on lowering the death rate.) Source:CDC

  3. Epidemiology in Action 3 PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER: STUDENT ASSIGNMENT • To apply all you’ve learned and try your hand at understanding and preventing health/safety problems, you will complete the following STEPS: • STEP I: Choose a health/safety problem to investigate. Please choose a problem that you have a personal interest in (maybe something that has become interesting to you as you have been working on this unit), and that will have research available through easily accessible databases. • Then, complete the activities described on the following screens (see worksheet): Health?Food?Diet?Fitness?Flu?Asthma?Cancer?Heart Disease?Eating Disorders?Learning Disabilities?Depression?Pollution?Car/Biking/Skating/Boarding Accidents?Violence?Crime?Pregnancy?Sexual Risk Behaviors? Drugs/Alcohol?

  4. Epidemiology in Action 4 • STEP 2: RESEARCH. Find studies that have already been conducted on your subject. Find at least TWO different types of studies (descriptive, case-control, cross-sectional, cohort, or experimental). Describe these studies by identifying WHO, WHAT,WHEN, WHERE, and HOW. Also document correctly the source for your statistics. • Identify in the studies at least one measure of each of the following: (these can be from different years, different samples, etc.) • Prevalence of the condition: ______________ • Incidence of the condition: ______________ PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER: STUDENT ASSIGNMENT Health?Food?Diet?Fitness?Flu?Asthma?Cancer?Heart Disease?Eating Disorders?Learning Disabilities?Depression?Pollution?Car/Biking/Skating/Boarding Accidents?Violence?Crime?Pregnancy?Sexual Risk Behaviors? Drugs/Alcohol?

  5. Epidemiology in Action 5 PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER: STUDENT ASSIGNMENT • STEP 3: HYPOTHESIS. Consider all you know, and all you have learned about your health/safety condition, and possible risk factors. Then, write a carefully considered HYPOTHESIS, in terms of one risk factor you could test that has not, to your knowledge, been tested so far in any of the studies you’ve read .

  6. Epidemiology in Action 6 PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER: STUDENT ASSIGNMENT • STEP 4: STUDY DESIGN. Once you have your hypothesis, DESIGN a study you could do that would support your HYPOTHESIS. Imagine that time, money, and all logistical considerations are no object – you have all the resources you need at your disposal. In your study design, address the following questions: Who would be your subjects, and how would you select them? How would you avoid bias? From where would you get your data, and how would you collect it? How would you avoid bias? What type of study would you use, and why would it be best for this type of study? What would be some confounding variables that might affect your results, and how would you prevent them from doing that?

  7. Epidemiology in Action 7 PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER: STUDENT ASSIGNMENT • STEP 5: STATISTICS • Part I. How would you analyze your hypothetical data, once you’ve collected it? Create hypothetical statistics (what MIGHT you find, if your hypothesis proved correct?) and calculate two hypothetical examples of the statistical measures you would use to determine the validity of your hypothesis. Present your hypothetical “findings” using the best format for the type of analysis you conducted (pie chart, bar/line graph, etc.) • Part II: Collect REAL data on some aspect of your health/safety condition (does not have to specifically address your entire hypothesis, but it must relate). This can be data from the sources we’ve used in this unit, from other sources widely available, or original data you collect. Then, analyze this data using appropriate statistical measures, and present your findings using the best format for the type of analysis you conducted (pie chart, bar/line graph, etc.)

  8. Epidemiology in Action 8 • STEP 6: Imagine that your hypothetical results HAVE proven to be statistically significant. What changes will you recommend that people/organizations/companies/countries make, and why? • Finally, design a plan to communicate your information, and your recommended changes to the world. As a part of this plan, complete your project by designing a persuasive poster about your condition, similar to these historical posters on health issues: Source: Library of Congress, 1938, 1941 -WPA project, and 1973.

  9. Epidemiology in Action An Integrated High School Curriculum for Math, Science, Social Studies, Language Arts, and Health By Annette Holmstrom Curtis High School Tacoma, Washington 98422