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Writing Process and SFL Informed Writing Instruction PowerPoint Presentation
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Writing Process and SFL Informed Writing Instruction

Writing Process and SFL Informed Writing Instruction

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Writing Process and SFL Informed Writing Instruction

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  1. Writing Process and SFL Informed Writing Instruction Overhead 3.1

  2. The Writing Process in English Overhead/Slide 2.12 Prerequisites to Writing in English 1. English writing system -letters (small and capitals) -punctuation symbols -directionality 2. Knowledge of the English language • Engagement • Audience Purpose • Voice • Background knowledge • Authentic • Activities • Text • Organization • Genre • Cultural • Differences • Vocabulary • Breadth • Depth • Morphology • Semantic • Relations • Language structure • Syntax and • Grammar • Morphology • Spelling & Conventions • Morphology • Phonology • Orthography • Punctuation • Capitalization Process Knowledge: Choosing topic, planning, drafting, revising, editing, publishing p. 147 Making Meaning from Text: Composing

  3. Knowledge Goals Participants will learn about the impact of audience, purpose, voice and background knowledge of the writing process and ensuring products. Participants will learn about creating authentic writing unites to motivate writing. p. 152

  4. Write a Letter To a friend telling her/him what you did last weekend To a colleague giving him/her the instructions on how teach using writer’s workshop To your principal asking him/her to extend the period for teaching writing Overhead/Slide 3.A.1

  5. AUDIENCE Person(s) reading the text Relative status between writer and audience. For example, Students writing scientific reports to show the principal how much they have learned Students writing scientific reports to teach a younger grade about the topic of their reports Overhead/Slide 3.A.2 p. 153-154

  6. PURPOSE: Elementary School Modes of Writing Story Telling (Narrative) Recount (personal, factual, imaginative, historical, procedural) Fictional Narrative Giving Instructions Procedure (Scientific Procedure) Organizing Information (Expository) Report (scientific, social science, research report) Explanation (scientific, historical) Persuading Exposition Discussion Historical, scientific argument Overhead/Slide 3.A.3 p. 155

  7. Voice Identity as a writer shown through the choice of language. Depends on purpose. For example, Story telling: witty, entertaining, funny Reports: authoritative, humble Exposition: authoritative, sure of self Overhead/Slide 3.A.4

  8. Talk-Write Talk/writer talks, questioner ask questions to expand Talk/writer writes, questioner assists Questioner reads the final piece Share by posting writings around the room Overhead/Slide 3.A.7 Strategy Explained on page 254

  9. Strategy: Talk Write Round One Talker talks about question. Questioner asks question to illicit more. Round Two Talker now writes about question. Questioner reminds of points or helping with expression. Finally Questioner reads the final piece. What is the importance of background knowledge to writing? Strategy Explained on page 254

  10. Background Knowledge When addressing background knowledge it is important to distinguish between: using the knowledge that students have and developing knowledge the students need. Background knowledge bears on the ability of students to write about a topic. It impacts: content organization vocabulary and language structure fluency Overhead/Slide 3.A.6

  11. RAN (Reading and Analyzing Non-Fiction) Overhead/Slide 3.A.8 p. 156 • Discuss a topic with students asking them what they think they know about a topic. • Write what they say on the chart, or better, write it on large post-it notes and put it under the 1st column. • Do research on the topic and • move things that were accurate to the 2nd column. • move things that were not accurate to the 3rd column. • write concepts or information that is new in the 4th column. • Ask students what else they would like to know and note it in the 5th column.

  12. The Writing Process in English Overhead/Slide 2.12 Prerequisites to Writing in English 1. English writing system -letters (small and capitals) -punctuation symbols -directionality 2. Knowledge of the English language • Engagement • Audience Purpose • Voice • Background knowledge • Authentic • Activities • Text • Organization • Genre • Cultural • Differences • Vocabulary • Breadth • Depth • Morphology • Semantic • Relations • Language structure • Syntax and • Grammar • Morphology • Spelling & Conventions • Morphology • Phonology • Orthography • Punctuation • Capitalization Process Knowledge: Choosing topic, planning, drafting, revising, editing, publishing p. 147 Making Meaning from Text: Composing

  13. Vocabulary: Coping Strategies Correct meaning, incorrect part of speech I love he Paraphrase (Something around neck [tie]) Repetition of known words (In a short paragraph about air pollution, a student had the word air 5 times and the word you 9 times) Code-switching (The molino turned in the wind) Use of dictionary (hard copy, electronic) Overhead/Slide 3.C.1

  14. Grammar Cartoon downloaded from : http://www.stolaf.edu/services/cel/E-Newsletter/Will%20Work%20Cartoon.jpg Overhead/Slide 3.C.2

  15. Reformulate and Explain Dear third grader, Your going to love fourth grade because the teacher is awesome. He dose coool things. We don’t do to hard of work. We went to Darcut and we’re going agian. We will go to Garden center too. You even get to be in a musecal. I was an actor. I talked in my English way. Right now I am testing so I have to go . Your friend MCAS 2004 4th grade ELA “failing score” Overhead/Slide 3.C.3

  16. Dear Third grader, You’re going to love fourth grade. The teacher is awesome. He does cool things. (Or,He’s really cool.) The work isn’t too hard. We went to Darcut and we’re going again. We will go to the Garden Center too. You can be in a musical. I was an actor [or . I was an actor in a musical.]. I spoke English. Right now I’m taking a test so I have to go. Your friend, Overhead/Slide 3.C.4

  17. Grammatical Morphemes Then we play [played] ball we go to the park. You flip the card however has the highest number win [wins]. I’ll get help so it could be more easier [be easier]. Sylvana and Paolo say to [two] tigers… [2004 3-4 MEPA; 2007 5-6 MEPA; 2005 MCAS ELA] Overhead/Slide 3.C.5

  18. Other Grammatical Inaccuracies Students need the [Ø] vocabulary to express their intended meaning so that they have [the] opportunity to write [problems with articles] He coming [be-auxiliary missing] He ugly [be-copula missing] The teacher bringed [brought] cookies. [irregular past] Overhead/Slide 3.C.6

  19. Deep Orthography Phonology 40 phonemes to 26 letters Phonetic function useful for spelling 46% of words (Heald-Taylor, 1998, p. 405) Morphology Electric /k/, electricity /s/, electrician/sh/ Nation /ey/, nationality /a/ Overhead/Slide 3.C.7

  20. Selected spelling strategies Represent vowel sound with one letter rather than letter combinations, common in English (dose /ds/= does) Use sound and word form from L1(sirele = cereal) Spanish CVCVCV Represent the sound with L1 letter-sound correspondence (sirele=cereal /i/sound represented with letter <i> as in Spanish; cwim=swim <c> represents the sound /s/ in Russian Use the name of the letter (musecal=musical the name of <e> sounds /i/ Overhead/Slide 3.C.8

  21. Selected Instructional Practices Overhead/Slide 3.C.9 Word study Special word center Word families Conferences Mini-lessons Editing Individual spelling lists Reformulation strategy Lots of reading and writing

  22. Selected Conventions in Other Languages ¡! ¿?(Spanish exclamation and question marks) junio, domingo (no capitalization of months or days of the week) Japanese and Chinese: no capitals or spaces Overhead/Slide 3.C.10

  23. General Structure of a Unit Stimuli: Read mentor text(s) in the genre. Uncoached writing: Give students a prompt that directs them to write in that genre. Assessment: Notice the successful and challenging features of structure and language in their writing. Teach aspects of the genre that will help with writing. Provide graphic organizers and pages that facilitate creating the structure of the chosen genre. Students plan, draft, and produce final copy. Overhead/Slide 3.D.1

  24. Rhetorical Approach Choosing and exploring the topic Define purpose (genre), audience, and type of text Narrowing the topic Text organization Select information Writing draft Editing Final copy and publishing Overhead/Slide 3.D.2

  25. Concluding ActivityObjectives Each participant will: Review and/or reflect on what she/he learned in the training 2. Design an action plan to change some aspect of instruction of reading/writing for ELLs that occurs within his/her specific context (classroom, grade level, school, district) Overhead/Slide 4.1

  26. Concluding Activity:Teacher Action Plan Think about the instruction of reading/writing for ELLs that occurs: In your classroom At your grade level In your school In your district How can the knowledge and skills that you developed in this training be integrated within that instruction for ELLs? Please create an action plan and share your plan with the group Overhead/Slide 4.2

  27. Sample Action Plan Chart Overhead/Slide 4.3