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Does the reel world affect the real world? PowerPoint Presentation
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Does the reel world affect the real world?

Does the reel world affect the real world?

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Does the reel world affect the real world?

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  1. Cognitive Learning Does the reel world affect the real world?

  2. Statistics • During their first 18 years people spend more time watching TV than in school • People who live to 75 will spend 9 years watching TV • 2/3rds of US house holds have 3 or more TVS • Average child views 8000 TV murders and 100,000 other acts of violence before finishing elementary school. • Cable programs in 1996/97 • 6 of 10 featured violence • 74% went unpunished • 58% did not show the victim’s pain

  3. Correlational Studies • The more hours elementary school children spend engaged with media violence the more often they get in fights when restudied two to six months later. (Anderson 2003) • The more hours children spend watching violent programs, the more at risk they also are for aggression and crime as teens and adults. (Eron 1987) • Compared 16-22 year olds. One group watched less than an hours when 14, the other three or more hours. Heavier group committed 5 times as many aggressive acts

  4. Correlational Studies • In the United States and Canada, homicide rates doubled between 1957 and 1974, coinciding with the introduction and spread of TV. • Moreover, census regions that were late in acquiring TV service had their homicide rate jump correspondingly later. • White South Africans were first introduced to TV in 1975. They had a similar doubling of the homicide rate in 1975. (Centerwall, 1989) • Sevenfold increase in violent play immediately after children viewed Power Rangers (Boyatzis 1995)

  5. APA’s position on Media and Violence • There is absolutely no doubt that higher levels of viewing violence on television are correlated with increased acceptance of aggressive attitudes and increased aggressive behavior.”

  6. National Institute of Mental Health • 1982 Meta-analysis of experimental data • There is a correlation • This is especially so when an attractive person commits seemingly justified , realistic violence that goes unpunished and causes no visible pain or harm. (Donnerstien 1998)

  7. Desensitization • Observers become more indifferent to increasing levels of violence • While spending three evenings watching sexually violent movies, male viewers in one experiment became progressively less bothered by the rapes and slashings • Compared to control group they expressed less sympathy for domestic violence victims, and they rated the victims’ injuries as less sever (Mulllin & Linz 1995) • Five days later, their attitudes had pretty much returned to normal levels.

  8. http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=7416252005704255651&q=violent+video+games&hl=enhttp://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=7416252005704255651&q=violent+video+games&hl=en