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IS-100 for Healthcare

IS-100 for Healthcare

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IS-100 for Healthcare

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    1. IS-100 for Healthcare Instructor Notes Welcome the participants to the course. Tell the participants that this course will introduce them to the Incident Command System (ICS). Introduce yourself by providing: ?? Your name and organization. ?? A brief statement of your experience with emergency or incident response using ICS. Instructor Notes Welcome the participants to the course. Tell the participants that this course will introduce them to the Incident Command System (ICS). Introduce yourself by providing: ?? Your name and organization. ?? A brief statement of your experience with emergency or incident response using ICS.

    2. IS-100 for Healthcare Instructor Notes: Inform the students that this program is brought to them by: This project is made available by St. Vincent Healthcare Foundation, through a grant funded by the U.S. Department ofHealth and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). Instructor Notes: Inform the students that this program is brought to them by: This project is made available bySt. Vincent Healthcare Foundation, through a grant funded by theU.S. Department ofHealth and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA).

    3. IS-100 for Healthcare Course Objective Demonstrate basic knowledge of the Incident Command System (ICS) for Healthcare Emergencies. Instructor Notes Tell participants that the objective for this course is for participants to demonstrate basic knowledge of the Incident Command System (ICS). Tell the participants that this course is designed to provide overall incident management skills rather than tactical expertise. Additional courses are available on developing and implementing incident tactics. Instructor Notes Tell participants that the objective for this course is for participants to demonstrate basic knowledge of the Incident Command System (ICS). Tell the participants that this course is designed to provide overall incident management skills rather than tactical expertise. Additional courses are available on developing and implementing incident tactics.

    4. Unit Objectives Identify three purposes of the Incident Command System (ICS) for Hospitals and Public Health. Identify requirements to use ICS during a Healthcare Emergency. Instructor Notes: Review the unit objectives with the group. Tell the participants that by the end of this unit, they should be able to: ?? Identify three purposes of the Incident Command System (ICS). ?? Using management best practices, ICS helps to ensure: ?? The safety of first receivers/responders and others. ?? The achievement of tactical objectives. ?? The efficient use of resources. ?? Identify requirements to use ICS. ?? National Incident Management Systems (NIMS) ?? Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) 1986 ?? Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule 1910.120 ?? State and Local Regulations Instructor Notes: Review the unit objectives with the group. Tell the participants that by the end of this unit, they should be able to: ?? Identify three purposes of the Incident Command System (ICS). ?? Using management best practices, ICS helps to ensure: ?? The safety of first receivers/responders and others. ?? The achievement of tactical objectives. ?? The efficient use of resources. ?? Identify requirements to use ICS. ?? National Incident Management Systems (NIMS) ?? Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) 1986 ?? Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule 1910.120 ?? State and Local Regulations

    5. NIMS Components & ICS Command and Management Instructor Notes: Explain that ICS is only one facet of NIMS. Present the following key points: NIMS integrates existing best practices into a consistent, nationwide approach to domestic incident management that is applicable at all jurisdictional levels and across functional disciplines in an all-hazards context. Six major components make up the NIMS systems approach. Following is a synopsis of each major component of NIMS, as well as how these components work together as a system to provide the national framework for preparing for, preventing, responding to, and recovering from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size, or complexity. Command and Management. NIMS standard incident command structures are based on three key organizational systems: ICS. ICS defines the operating characteristics, interactive management components, and structure of incident management and emergency response organizations engaged throughout the life cycle of an incident; Multiagency Coordination Systems. These define the operating characteristics, interactive management components, and organizational structure of supporting incident management entities engaged at the Federal, State, local, tribal, and regional levels through mutual-aid agreements and other assistance arrangements; and Public Information Systems. These refer to processes, procedures, and systems for communicating timely and accurate information to the public during crisis or emergency situations. Preparedness. Effective incident management begins with a host of preparedness activities conducted on a steady-state basis, well in advance of any potential incident. Preparedness involves an integrated combination of planning, training, exercises, personnel qualification and certification standards, equipment acquisition and certification standards, and publication management processes and activities. Resource Management. NIMS defines standardized mechanisms and establishes requirements for processes to describe, inventory, mobilize, dispatch, track, and recover resources over the life cycle of an incident. Communications and Information Management. NIMS identifies the requirement for a standardized framework for communications, information management (collection, analysis, and dissemination), and information sharing at all levels of incident management. Supporting Technologies. Technology and technological systems provide supporting capabilities essential to implementing and continuously refining NIMS. These technologies include voice and data communications systems, information management systems (i.e., recordkeeping and resource tracking), and data display systems. Also included are specialized technologies that facilitate ongoing operations and incident management activities in situations that call for unique technology-based capabilities. Ongoing Management and Maintenance. This component establishes an activity to provide strategic direction for and oversight of NIMS, supporting both routine review and the continuous refinement of the system and its components over the long term. Instructor Notes: Explain that ICS is only one facet of NIMS. Present the following key points: NIMS integrates existing best practices into a consistent, nationwide approach to domestic incident management that is applicable at all jurisdictional levels and across functional disciplines in an all-hazards context. Six major components make up the NIMS systems approach. Following is a synopsis of each major component of NIMS, as well as how these components work together as a system to provide the national framework for preparing for, preventing, responding to, and recovering from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size, or complexity. Command and Management. NIMS standard incident command structures are based on three key organizational systems: ICS. ICS defines the operating characteristics, interactive management components, and structure of incident management and emergency response organizations engaged throughout the life cycle of an incident; Multiagency Coordination Systems. These define the operating characteristics, interactive management components, and organizational structure of supporting incident management entities engaged at the Federal, State, local, tribal, and regional levels through mutual-aid agreements and other assistance arrangements; and Public Information Systems. These refer to processes, procedures, and systems for communicating timely and accurate information to the public during crisis or emergency situations. Preparedness. Effective incident management begins with a host of preparedness activities conducted on a steady-state basis, well in advance of any potential incident. Preparedness involves an integrated combination of planning, training, exercises, personnel qualification and certification standards, equipment acquisition and certification standards, and publication management processes and activities. Resource Management. NIMS defines standardized mechanisms and establishes requirements for processes to describe, inventory, mobilize, dispatch, track, and recover resources over the life cycle of an incident. Communications and Information Management. NIMS identifies the requirement for a standardized framework for communications, information management (collection, analysis, and dissemination), and information sharing at all levels of incident management. Supporting Technologies. Technology and technological systems provide supporting capabilities essential to implementing and continuously refining NIMS. These technologies include voice and data communications systems, information management systems (i.e., recordkeeping and resource tracking), and data display systems. Also included are specialized technologies that facilitate ongoing operations and incident management activities in situations that call for unique technology-based capabilities. Ongoing Management and Maintenance. This component establishes an activity to provide strategic direction for and oversight of NIMS, supporting both routine review and the continuous refinement of the system and its components over the long term.

    6. Other ICS Mandates Hazardous Materials Incidents Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) 1986 Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule 1910.120 JCAHO State and Local Regulations State EOP and annexes (HazMat, Terrorism, etc) County EOP and annexes Hospital Disaster Plans Mass Casualty Incident Plans Local Resolutions Instructor Notes: Explain that in addition to the NIMS mandate, the following laws require the use of ICS: The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 established Federal regulations for handling hazardous materials. SARA directed the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to establish rules for operations at hazardous materials incidents. OSHA rule 1910.120, effective March 6, 1990, requires all organizations that handle hazardous materials to use ICS. The regulation states: The Incident Command System shall be established by those employers for the incidents that will be under their control and shall interface with other organizations or agencies who may respond to such an incident. Note that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires States to use ICS at hazardous materials incidents. IMPORTANT INSTRUCTOR NOTE: Add any State and local regulations governing the use of ICS. County EOP Local Resolution signed by County Commission Instructor Notes: Explain that in addition to the NIMS mandate, the following laws require the use of ICS: The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 established Federal regulations for handling hazardous materials. SARA directed the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to establish rules for operations at hazardous materials incidents. OSHA rule 1910.120, effective March 6, 1990, requires all organizations that handle hazardous materials to use ICS. The regulation states: The Incident Command System shall be established by those employers for the incidents that will be under their control and shall interface with other organizations or agencies who may respond to such an incident. Note that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires States to use ICS at hazardous materials incidents. IMPORTANT INSTRUCTOR NOTE: Add any State and local regulations governing the use of ICS. County EOP Local Resolution signed by County Commission

    7. Video: ICS Overview Instructor Notes: Explain that this presentation provides an overview of what the Incident Command System is and why it is used. Instructions for playing video: The videos are activated by a single click on the image in Slide Show mode. If you click a second time on the video, it will stop. The videos will not work unless you are in Slide Show mode. The total running time for the video is 1:54. Transcript: Incident Command System An incident is an occurrence, either caused by humans or natural phenomena, that requires response actions to prevent or minimize loss of life or damage to property and/or the environment. Examples of incidents include: ?? Fire, both structural and wildland. ?? Natural disasters, such as tornadoes, floods, ice storms, or earthquakes. ?? Human and animal disease outbreaks. ?? Search and rescue missions. ?? Hazardous materials incidents. ?? Criminal acts and crime scene investigations. ?? Terrorist incidents, including the use of weapons of mass destruction. ?? National Special Security Events, such as Presidential visits or the Super Bowl. ?? Other planned events, such as parades or demonstrations. Instructor Notes: Explain that this presentation provides an overview of what the Incident Command System is and why it is used. Instructions for playing video: The videos are activated by a single click on the image in Slide Show mode. If you click a second time on the video, it will stop. The videos will not work unless you are in Slide Show mode. The total running time for the video is 1:54. Transcript: Incident Command System An incident is an occurrence, either caused by humans or natural phenomena, that requires response actions to prevent or minimize loss of life or damage to property and/or the environment. Examples of incidents include: ?? Fire, both structural and wildland. ?? Natural disasters, such as tornadoes, floods, ice storms, or earthquakes. ?? Human and animal disease outbreaks. ?? Search and rescue missions. ?? Hazardous materials incidents. ?? Criminal acts and crime scene investigations. ?? Terrorist incidents, including the use of weapons of mass destruction. ?? National Special Security Events, such as Presidential visits or the Super Bowl. ?? Other planned events, such as parades or demonstrations.

    8. What Is an Incident? An incident is . . . . . . an occurrence, either caused by human or natural phenomena, that requires response actions to prevent or minimize loss of life, or damage to property and/or the environment. Instructor Notes: Explain that an incident is an occurrence, either caused by human or natural phenomena, that requires response actions to prevent or minimize loss of life, or damage to property and/or the environment. Instructor Notes: Explain that an incident is an occurrence, either caused by human or natural phenomena, that requires response actions to prevent or minimize loss of life, or damage to property and/or the environment.

    9. What Is ICS? Standardized, all-hazard incident management concept. Allows its users to adopt an integrated organizational structure. Has considerable internal flexibility. A proven management system based on successful business practices. The result of decades of lessons learned in the organization and management of emergencies and incidents. Instructor Notes: Because of today's budget constraints and limited staffing of local, state, tribal and federal agencies, it's not possible for any one agency to handle all of the management and resource needs for the increasing numbers of incidents nationwide. Local, state, tribal and federal agencies must work together in a smooth, coordinated effort under the same management system. The Incident Command System, or ICS, is a standardized, on-scene, all-hazard incident management concept. ICS allows its users to adopt an integrated organizational structure to match the complexities and demands of single or multiple incidents without being hindered by jurisdictional boundaries. ICS has considerable internal flexibility. It can grow or shrink to meet different needs. This flexibility makes it a very cost effective and efficient management approach for both small and large situations. ICS is a proven management system based on successful business practices, and includes decades of lessons learned in the organization and management of emergency incidents. This system represents organizational "best practices," and has become the standard for emergency management across the country.Instructor Notes: Because of today's budget constraints and limited staffing of local, state, tribal and federal agencies, it's not possible for any one agency to handle all of the management and resource needs for the increasing numbers of incidents nationwide. Local, state, tribal and federal agencies must work together in a smooth, coordinated effort under the same management system. The Incident Command System, or ICS, is a standardized, on-scene, all-hazard incident management concept. ICS allows its users to adopt an integrated organizational structure to match the complexities and demands of single or multiple incidents without being hindered by jurisdictional boundaries. ICS has considerable internal flexibility. It can grow or shrink to meet different needs. This flexibility makes it a very cost effective and efficient management approach for both small and large situations. ICS is a proven management system based on successful business practices, and includes decades of lessons learned in the organization and management of emergency incidents. This system represents organizational "best practices," and has become the standard for emergency management across the country.

    10. Using management best practices, ICS helps to ensure: The safety of responders/receivers and others. The achievement of incident objectives. The efficient use of resources. ICS Purposes Instructor Notes: Emphasize that by using management best practices, ICS helps to ensure: ?? The safety of responders and others. ?? The achievement of tactical objectives. ?? The efficient use of resources. Instructor Notes: Emphasize that by using management best practices, ICS helps to ensure: ?? The safety of responders and others. ?? The achievement of tactical objectives. ?? The efficient use of resources.

    11. Video: History of ICS Instructor Notes: Tell the participants that this video explains why the Incident Command System was initially developed. Instructions for playing video: The videos are activated by a single click on the image in Slide Show mode. If you click a second time on the video, it will stop. The videos will not work unless you are in Slide Show mode. The total running time for the video is 1:46. Transcript: History of the Incident Command System The Incident Command System (ICS) was developed in the 1970s following a series of catastrophic fires in California's urban interface. Property damage ran into the millions, and many people died or were injured. The personnel assigned to determine the causes of this disaster studied the case histories and discovered that response problems could rarely be attributed to lack of resources or failure of tactics. What were the lessons learned? Surprisingly, studies found that response problems were far more likely to result from inadequate management than from any other single reason. Weaknesses in incident management were often due to: ?? Lack of accountability, including unclear chains of command and supervision. ?? Poor communication due to both inefficient uses of available communications systems and conflicting codes and terminology. ?? Lack of an orderly, systematic planning process. ?? No common, flexible, pre-designed management structure that enables commanders to delegate responsibilities and manage workloads efficiently. ?? No predefined methods to integrate interagency requirements into the management structure and planning process effectively. A poorly managed incident response can be devastating to our economy and our health and safety. With so much at stake, we must effectively manage our response efforts. The Incident Command System, or ICS, allows us to do so. ICS is a proven management system based on successful business practices. This course introduces you to basic ICS concepts and terminology. Instructor Notes: Tell the participants that this video explains why the Incident Command System was initially developed. Instructions for playing video: The videos are activated by a single click on the image in Slide Show mode. If you click a second time on the video, it will stop. The videos will not work unless you are in Slide Show mode. The total running time for the video is 1:46. Transcript: History of the Incident Command System The Incident Command System (ICS) was developed in the 1970s following a series of catastrophic fires in California's urban interface. Property damage ran into the millions, and many people died or were injured. The personnel assigned to determine the causes of this disaster studied the case histories and discovered that response problems could rarely be attributed to lack of resources or failure of tactics. What were the lessons learned? Surprisingly, studies found that response problems were far more likely to result from inadequate management than from any other single reason. Weaknesses in incident management were often due to: ?? Lack of accountability, including unclear chains of command and supervision. ?? Poor communication due to both inefficient uses of available communications systems and conflicting codes and terminology. ?? Lack of an orderly, systematic planning process. ?? No common, flexible, pre-designed management structure that enables commanders to delegate responsibilities and manage workloads efficiently. ?? No predefined methods to integrate interagency requirements into the management structure and planning process effectively. A poorly managed incident response can be devastating to our economy and our health and safety. With so much at stake, we must effectively manage our response efforts. The Incident Command System, or ICS, allows us to do so. ICS is a proven management system based on successful business practices. This course introduces you to basic ICS concepts and terminology.

    12. History of ICS Weaknesses in incident management were due to: Lack of accountability, including unclear chain of command and supervision. Poor communication, including system and terminology problems. Lack of an orderly, systematic planning process. No common, flexible, predesigned management structure. No predefined methods to integrate interagency requirements into the management structure and planning process. Instructor Notes: Weaknesses in incident management were often due to: Lack of accountability, including unclear chains of command and supervision. Poor communication, because of inefficient uses of available communications systems and conflicting codes and terminology. Lack of an orderly, systematic planning process. No common, flexible, pre-designed management structure that enables commanders to delegate responsibilities and manage workloads efficiently. No predefined methods to integrate interagency requirements into the management structure and planning process effectively. Poorly managed incident response can be devastating to our economy, the food supply, and our health and safety. With so much at stake, we must effectively manage our response efforts. The Incident Command System, or ICS, allows us to do so. ICS is a proven management system based on successful business practices. This course introduces the students to basic ICS concepts and terminology. Instructor Notes: Weaknesses in incident management were often due to: Lack of accountability, including unclear chains of command and supervision. Poor communication, because of inefficient uses of available communications systems and conflicting codes and terminology. Lack of an orderly, systematic planning process. No common, flexible, pre-designed management structure that enables commanders to delegate responsibilities and manage workloads efficiently. No predefined methods to integrate interagency requirements into the management structure and planning process effectively. Poorly managed incident response can be devastating to our economy, the food supply, and our health and safety. With so much at stake, we must effectively manage our response efforts. The Incident Command System, or ICS, allows us to do so. ICS is a proven management system based on successful business practices. This course introduces the students to basic ICS concepts and terminology.

    13. ICS Benefits What ICS is designed to do: Meet the needs of incidents/disasters of any kind or size. Allow personnel from a variety of agencies and private organizations to meld rapidly into a common management structure. Provide logistical and administrative support to operational staff. Be cost effective by avoiding duplication of efforts. Instructor Notes: Designers of the system recognized early that ICS must be interdisciplinary and organizationally flexible to: Meet the needs of incidents of any kind or size. Allow personnel from a variety of agencies to meld rapidly into a common management structure. Provide logistical and administrative support to operational staff. Be cost effective by avoiding duplication of efforts. ICS has been tested in more than 30 years of emergency and non-emergency applications, by all levels of government and in the private sector. Instructor Notes: Designers of the system recognized early that ICS must be interdisciplinary and organizationally flexible to: Meet the needs of incidents of any kind or size. Allow personnel from a variety of agencies to meld rapidly into a common management structure. Provide logistical and administrative support to operational staff. Be cost effective by avoiding duplication of efforts. ICS has been tested in more than 30 years of emergency and non-emergency applications, by all levels of government and in the private sector.

    14. Applications for the Use of ICS Applications for the use of ICS include: Routine or planned events (e.g. celebrations, parades, and concerts, conventions, etc.) Fires, hazardous materials, and multi-casualty incidents/accidents. Multijurisdictional and multiagency disasters, such as earthquakes, floods, and winter storms. Search and rescue missions. Infectious outbreaks and disease containment. Acts of terrorism. Instructor Notes: Applications for the use of ICS include: Routine or planned events (e.g., celebrations, parades, and concerts, conventions, etc.). Fires, hazardous materials, and multi-casualty incidents. Multijurisdiction and multiagency disasters, such as earthquakes, hurricanes, floods, and winter storms. Search and rescue missions. Biological outbreaks and disease containment. Acts of terrorism. Instructor Notes: Applications for the use of ICS include: Routine or planned events (e.g., celebrations, parades, and concerts, conventions, etc.). Fires, hazardous materials, and multi-casualty incidents. Multijurisdiction and multiagency disasters, such as earthquakes, hurricanes, floods, and winter storms. Search and rescue missions. Biological outbreaks and disease containment. Acts of terrorism.

    15. Knowledge Review Instructions: Decide if the statement is TRUE or FALSE. Instructor Notes: Ask the participants if the following statement is TRUE or FALSE. ICS could be used to manage a training conference, charity fundraising event, or emergency response and recovery. Allow the participants time to respond. Review the correct answer: This statement is true. Instructor Notes: Ask the participants if the following statement is TRUE or FALSE. ICS could be used to manage a training conference, charity fundraising event, or emergency response and recovery. Allow the participants time to respond. Review the correct answer: This statement is true.

    16. Basic ICS Features There are 14 basic features of the Incident Command System (ICS), including: Common terminology. Modular organization. Management by objectives. Reliance on an Incident Action Plan (IAP). Chain of command and unity of command. Unified Command. Manageable span of control. Pre-designated incident locations and facilities. Resource management. Information and intelligence management. Integrated communications. Transfer of command. Accountability. Mobilization. Instructor Notes: Tell the group that by the end of this unit they should be able to describe the basic features of the Incident Command System (ICS), including: ?? Common terminology. ?? Modular organization. ?? Management by objectives. ?? Reliance on an Incident Action Plan (IAP). ?? Chain of command and unity of command. ?? Unified Command. ?? Manageable span of control. ?? Predesignated incident locations and facilities. ?? Resource management. ?? Information and intelligence management. ?? Integrated communications. ?? Transfer of command. ?? Accountability. ?? Mobilization.Instructor Notes: Tell the group that by the end of this unit they should be able to describe the basic features of the Incident Command System (ICS), including: ?? Common terminology. ?? Modular organization. ?? Management by objectives. ?? Reliance on an Incident Action Plan (IAP). ?? Chain of command and unity of command. ?? Unified Command. ?? Manageable span of control. ?? Predesignated incident locations and facilities. ?? Resource management. ?? Information and intelligence management. ?? Integrated communications. ?? Transfer of command. ?? Accountability. ?? Mobilization.

    17. Common Terminology Common Terminology is essential to ensuring efficient, clear communication. Using common terminology helps to define: Organizational functions. Incident facilities. Resource descriptions. Position titles. Instructor Notes: The ability to communicate within ICS is absolutely critical. Using standard or common terminology is essential to ensuring efficient, clear communication. ICS requires the use of common terminology, meaning standard titles for facilities and positions within the organization. Explain that common terminology also includes the use of "clear text"that is, communication without the use of agency-specific codes or jargon. In other words, use plain English. Uncommon Terminology: "Response Branch, this is HazMat 1, we are 10-24." Common Terminology: "Response Branch, this is HazMat 1, we have completed our assignment." Instructor Notes: The ability to communicate within ICS is absolutely critical. Using standard or common terminology is essential to ensuring efficient, clear communication. ICS requires the use of common terminology, meaning standard titles for facilities and positions within the organization. Explain that common terminology also includes the use of "clear text"that is, communication without the use of agency-specific codes or jargon. In other words, use plain English. Uncommon Terminology: "Response Branch, this is HazMat 1, we are 10-24." Common Terminology: "Response Branch, this is HazMat 1, we have completed our assignment."

    18. Use of Plain English Communications should be in plain English or clear text. Do not use radio codes, agency-specific codes, or jargon. Instructor Notes: Optional Activity: Prior to showing this visual, provide each team with a different message containing jargon or codes. Indicating an action they should take in the classroom (e.g., going to a certain corner of the report, count the number of PWDs (personal writing devices) at the table, giving the teams yellow rectangles and red circles and tell them to fold the ROs (rectangular objects), etc.). Ask the teams to read the codes and then implement the required action. Next, ask the teams if decoding the messages delayed their ability to respond. Next, explain that using common terminology means that communications should be in plain English or clear text. It also means that you should not use radio codes, agency-specific codes, or jargon. Ask the participants the following question: Even if you use radio codes on a daily basis, why should you use plain English during an incident response? Allow the participants time to respond. If not mentioned by the group, tell the participants that it is important to use plain English during an incident response because often there is more than one agency involved in an incident. Ambiguous codes and acronyms have proven to be major obstacles in communications. Often agencies have a variety of codes and acronyms that they use routinely during normal operations. Not every ten code is the same nor does every acronym have the same meaning. When these codes and acronyms are used on an incident, confusion is often the result. The National Incident Management Systems (NIMS) requires that all responders use plain English, referred to as clear text, and within the United States, English is the standard language. Instructor Notes: Optional Activity: Prior to showing this visual, provide each team with a different message containing jargon or codes. Indicating an action they should take in the classroom (e.g., going to a certain corner of the report, count the number of PWDs (personal writing devices) at the table, giving the teams yellow rectangles and red circles and tell them to fold the ROs (rectangular objects), etc.). Ask the teams to read the codes and then implement the required action. Next, ask the teams if decoding the messages delayed their ability to respond. Next, explain that using common terminology means that communications should be in plain English or clear text. It also means that you should not use radio codes, agency-specific codes, or jargon. Ask the participants the following question: Even if you use radio codes on a daily basis, why should you use plain English during an incident response? Allow the participants time to respond. If not mentioned by the group, tell the participants that it is important to use plain English during an incident response because often there is more than one agency involved in an incident. Ambiguous codes and acronyms have proven to be major obstacles in communications. Often agencies have a variety of codes and acronyms that they use routinely during normal operations. Not every ten code is the same nor does every acronym have the same meaning. When these codes and acronyms are used on an incident, confusion is often the result. The National Incident Management Systems (NIMS) requires that all responders use plain English, referred to as clear text, and within the United States, English is the standard language.

    19. Why Plain English? EMT = Emergency Medical Treatment EMT = Emergency Medical Technician EMT = Emergency Management Team EMT = Eastern Mediterranean Time EMT = Effective Methods Team EMT = Effects Management Tool EMT = El Monte, CA (airport code) EMT = Electron Microscope Tomography EMT = Email Money Transfer Instructor Notes: Refer the participants to the following examples of different meanings of a common acronym. EMT = Emergency Medical Treatment EMT = Emergency Medical Technician EMT = Emergency Management Team EMT = Eastern Mediterranean Time (GMT+0200) EMT = Effective Methods Team EMT = Effects Management Tool EMT = El Monte, CA (airport code) EMT = Electron Microscope Tomography EMT = Email Money Transfer Ask the participants for examples of other codes or jargon that could be misunderstood by responders from different agencies. Instructor Notes: Refer the participants to the following examples of different meanings of a common acronym. EMT = Emergency Medical Treatment EMT = Emergency Medical Technician EMT = Emergency Management Team EMT = Eastern Mediterranean Time (GMT+0200) EMT = Effective Methods Team EMT = Effects Management Tool EMT = El Monte, CA (airport code) EMT = Electron Microscope Tomography EMT = Email Money Transfer Ask the participants for examples of other codes or jargon that could be misunderstood by responders from different agencies.

    20. Use of Plain English: Improve Your English Show the video.Show the video.

    21. Common Terminology: Example Instructor Notes: Ask the participants the following question: Which is the example of common terminology? A. Medic 1, GH, we have a 10-42, with MC. B. Medic 1, General Hospital, we are on scene at a traffic accident with multiple casualties. Allow the group time to respond. If not mentioned by the group, explain that B is the correct choice. Point out that this is an example of common terminology. Instructor Notes: Ask the participants the following question: Which is the example of common terminology? A. Medic 1, GH, we have a 10-42, with MC. B. Medic 1, General Hospital, we are on scene at a traffic accident with multiple casualties. Allow the group time to respond. If not mentioned by the group, explain that B is the correct choice. Point out that this is an example of common terminology.

    22. Management by Objectives ICS is managed by objectives. Objectives are communicated throughout the entire ICS organization through the incident planning process. Instructor Notes: Tell the group that management by objectives is another key ICS feature. Emphasize these key points: ?? ICS is managed by objectives. ?? Objectives are communicated throughout the entire ICS organization through the incident planning process. Tell the group that the next visual will outline the steps for establishing incident objectives. Instructor Notes: Tell the group that management by objectives is another key ICS feature. Emphasize these key points: ?? ICS is managed by objectives. ?? Objectives are communicated throughout the entire ICS organization through the incident planning process. Tell the group that the next visual will outline the steps for establishing incident objectives.

    23. Overall Priorities Incident objectives are established based on the following priorities: #1: Life Saving #2: Incident Stabilization #3: Property (Economic/Environmental) Preservation. Instructor Notes: Explain that incident objectives are established based on the following priorities: First Priority: Life Saving Second Priority: Incident Stabilization Third Priority: Property Preservation Ask the participants for examples of each type of priority. Present examples based on your experience. Instructor Notes: Explain that incident objectives are established based on the following priorities: First Priority: Life Saving Second Priority: Incident Stabilization Third Priority: Property Preservation Ask the participants for examples of each type of priority. Present examples based on your experience.

    24. Reliance on an Incident Action Plan Every incident must have an Incident Action Plan (IAP) that: Specifies the incident objectives. States the activities to be completed. Covers a specified timeframe, called an Operational Period (e.g. Shift Change). May be oral or writtenexcept for hazardous materials incidents, which require a written IAP. Instructor Notes: Every incident must have a verbal or written Incident Action Plan. The purpose of this plan is to provide all incident supervisory personnel with direction for actions to be implemented during the operational period identified in the plan. Incident Action Plans include the measurable tactical operations to be achieved and are prepared around a timeframe called an Operational Period. At the simplest level, all Incident Action Plans must have four elements: What do we want to do? Who is responsible for doing it? How do we communicate with each other? What is the procedure if someone is injured? Instructor Notes: Every incident must have a verbal or written Incident Action Plan. The purpose of this plan is to provide all incident supervisory personnel with direction for actions to be implemented during the operational period identified in the plan. Incident Action Plans include the measurable tactical operations to be achieved and are prepared around a timeframe called an Operational Period. At the simplest level, all Incident Action Plans must have four elements: What do we want to do? Who is responsible for doing it? How do we communicate with each other? What is the procedure if someone is injured?

    25. Elements of an Incident Action Plan Every IAP must have four elements: What do we want to do? Who is responsible for doing it? How do we communicate with each other? What is the procedure if someone is injured (Staff)? Instructor Notes: Explain that every IAP must answer the following four questions: ?? What do we want to do? ?? Who is responsible for doing it? ?? How do we communicate with each other? ?? What is the procedure if someone is injured? Instructor Notes: Explain that every IAP must answer the following four questions: ?? What do we want to do? ?? Who is responsible for doing it? ?? How do we communicate with each other? ?? What is the procedure if someone is injured?

    26. Manageable Span of Control Span of control: Pertains to the number of individuals or resources that one supervisor can manage effectively during an incident. Is key to effective and efficient incident management. Instructor Notes: Explain that the next ICS feature that this unit covers is manageable span of control. Point out that span of control: ?? Pertains to the number of individuals or resources that one supervisor can manage effectively during an incident. ?? Is key to effective and efficient incident management. Emphasize that supervisors must be able to adequately supervise and control their subordinates, as well as communicate with and manage all resources under their supervision.Instructor Notes: Explain that the next ICS feature that this unit covers is manageable span of control. Point out that span of control: ?? Pertains to the number of individuals or resources that one supervisor can manage effectively during an incident. ?? Is key to effective and efficient incident management. Emphasize that supervisors must be able to adequately supervise and control their subordinates, as well as communicate with and manage all resources under their supervision.

    27. ICS Management: Span of Control ICS span of control for any supervisor: Is between 3 and 7 subordinates. Optimally does not exceed 5 subordinates. Instructor Notes: Maintaining adequate span of control throughout the ICS organization is very important. Effective span of control on incidents may vary from three (3) to seven (7), but a ratio of one (1) supervisor to five (5) reporting elements is recommended. If the number of reporting elements falls outside of these ranges, expansion or consolidation of the organization may be necessary. There may be exceptions, usually in lower-risk assignments or where resources work in close proximity to each other. Instructor Notes: Maintaining adequate span of control throughout the ICS organization is very important. Effective span of control on incidents may vary from three (3) to seven (7), but a ratio of one (1) supervisor to five (5) reporting elements is recommended. If the number of reporting elements falls outside of these ranges, expansion or consolidation of the organization may be necessary. There may be exceptions, usually in lower-risk assignments or where resources work in close proximity to each other.

    28. Span of Control Considerations Span of control considerations are influenced by the: Type of incident. Nature of the task. Hazards and safety factors. Distances between personnel and resources. Instructor Notes: Explain that span of control considerations are influenced by the: ?? Type of incident. ?? Nature of the task. ?? Hazards and safety factors. ?? Distances between personnel and resources. Ask the participants if there are other factors that could influence the span of control. Instructor Notes: Explain that span of control considerations are influenced by the: ?? Type of incident. ?? Nature of the task. ?? Hazards and safety factors. ?? Distances between personnel and resources. Ask the participants if there are other factors that could influence the span of control.

    29. Manageable Span of Control Use the cat herder video.Use the cat herder video.

    30. Provide a common standard for all users. Helps to ensure that qualified individuals fill positions. Useful when requesting personnel. Standardizes communication. ICS Position Titles Instructor Notes: To maintain span of control, the ICS organization can be divided into many levels of supervision. At each level, individuals with primary responsibility positions have distinct titles. Using specific ICS position titles serves three important purposes: Titles provide a common standard for all users. For example, if one agency uses the title Branch Chief, another Branch Director, etc., this lack of consistency can cause confusion at the incident. The use of distinct titles for ICS positions allows for filling these positions with the most qualified individuals rather than by seniority. Standardized position titles are useful when requesting qualified personnel. For example, in deploying personnel, it is important to know if the positions needed are Unit Leaders, clerks, etc.Instructor Notes: To maintain span of control, the ICS organization can be divided into many levels of supervision. At each level, individuals with primary responsibility positions have distinct titles. Using specific ICS position titles serves three important purposes: Titles provide a common standard for all users. For example, if one agency uses the title Branch Chief, another Branch Director, etc., this lack of consistency can cause confusion at the incident. The use of distinct titles for ICS positions allows for filling these positions with the most qualified individuals rather than by seniority. Standardized position titles are useful when requesting qualified personnel. For example, in deploying personnel, it is important to know if the positions needed are Unit Leaders, clerks, etc.

    31. ICS Supervisory Position Titles Titles for all ICS supervisory levels are shown in the table below.

    32. Modular Organization (1 of 2) Develops in a bottom-up, modular fashion starting with a single resource. Is based on the size and complexity of the incident. Is based on the hazard environment created by the incident. Instructor Notes: Tell participants that another important ICS feature is modular organization, which means that the Incident Command System: ?? Develops in a bottom-up, modular fashion. ?? Is based on the size and complexity of the incident ?? Is based on the hazard environment created by the incident. When needed, separate functional elements can be established, each of which may be further subdivided to enhance internal organizational management and external coordination. Instructor Notes: Tell participants that another important ICS feature is modular organization, which means that the Incident Command System: ?? Develops in a bottom-up, modular fashion. ?? Is based on the size and complexity of the incident ?? Is based on the hazard environment created by the incident. When needed, separate functional elements can be established, each of which may be further subdivided to enhance internal organizational management and external coordination.

    33. Modular Organization (2 of 2) Incident objectives determine the organizational size. Only functions/positions that are necessary will be filled. Each element must have a person in charge. Instructor Notes: Explain that employing a modular organization means that: ?? Incident objectives determine the organizational size. ?? Only functions/positions that are necessary will be filled. ?? Each element must have a person in charge. Optional: Distribute examples of organizational charts from recent incidents that demonstrate how the ICS organization adjusts to fit the requirements of the incident. Instructor Notes: Explain that employing a modular organization means that: ?? Incident objectives determine the organizational size. ?? Only functions/positions that are necessary will be filled. ?? Each element must have a person in charge. Optional: Distribute examples of organizational charts from recent incidents that demonstrate how the ICS organization adjusts to fit the requirements of the incident.

    34. ICS Organization In the ICS organization: There is no correlation with the administrative structure of any other agency/private organization or jurisdiction. This organizations uniqueness helps to avoid confusion over different position titles and organizational structures. Someone who serves as a Director of Nursing or Public Health Officer every day may not hold that title when deployed under an ICS structure. Instructor Notes: Explain that in the ICS organization: ?? There is no correlation with the administrative structure of any other agency or jurisdiction. This organizations uniqueness helps to avoid confusion over different position titles and organizational structures. ?? Someone who serves as a Director of Nursing or Public Health Nurse every day may not hold that title when deployed under an ICS structure.Instructor Notes: Explain that in the ICS organization: ?? There is no correlation with the administrative structure of any other agency or jurisdiction. This organizations uniqueness helps to avoid confusion over different position titles and organizational structures. ?? Someone who serves as a Director of Nursing or Public Health Nurse every day may not hold that title when deployed under an ICS structure.

    35. Chain of Command Chain of command is an orderly line of authority within the ranks of the incident management organization. Instructor Notes: Tell the participants that the next ICS feature is chain of command. Explain that chain of command is an orderly line of authority within the ranks of the incident management organization. Instructor Notes: Tell the participants that the next ICS feature is chain of command. Explain that chain of command is an orderly line of authority within the ranks of the incident management organization.

    36. Unity of Command Under unity of command, personnel: Report to only one supervisor. Receive work assignments only from their supervisors. Instructor Notes: Tell the group that under unity of command, another key ICS feature, personnel: ?? Report to only one supervisor. ?? Maintain formal communication relationships only with that supervisor. Unity of command means that every individual has a designated supervisor to whom they report at the scene of the incident. Emphasize that together the principles of chain of command and unity of command help to clarify reporting relationships and eliminate the confusion caused by multiple, conflicting directives. Incident managers at all levels must be able to control the actions of all personnel under their supervision. Emphasize that the participants should not confuse unity of command with Unified Command. The next visual will explain the concept of Unified Command and clarify the differences between unity of command and Unified Command. Instructor Notes: Tell the group that under unity of command, another key ICS feature, personnel: ?? Report to only one supervisor. ?? Maintain formal communication relationships only with that supervisor. Unity of command means that every individual has a designated supervisor to whom they report at the scene of the incident. Emphasize that together the principles of chain of command and unity of command help to clarify reporting relationships and eliminate the confusion caused by multiple, conflicting directives. Incident managers at all levels must be able to control the actions of all personnel under their supervision. Emphasize that the participants should not confuse unity of command with Unified Command. The next visual will explain the concept of Unified Command and clarify the differences between unity of command and Unified Command.

    37. Knowledge Review Instructions: Determine if the span of control is consistent with ICS guidelines. Situation: A major accident (5 vehicles with 6 critical patients) has occurred in the municipality. Response actions have begun, with resources reporting to the Operations Section Chief at the Hospital. Instructor Notes: Tell the participants to review the situation on the visual. Situation: A major accident (5 vehicle with 6 critical patients) has occurred in the municipality. Response actions have begun, with resources reporting to the Operations Section Chief at the hospital. Ask the participants to determine if the span of control is consistent with ICS guidelines. Allow the participants time to respond. If not mentioned, point out that the span of control is NOT consistent with ICS guidelines. Remind them that ICS span of control for any supervisor is between 3 and 7 subordinates and optimally does not exceed 5 subordinates. Instructor Notes: Tell the participants to review the situation on the visual. Situation: A major accident (5 vehicle with 6 critical patients) has occurred in the municipality. Response actions have begun, with resources reporting to the Operations Section Chief at the hospital. Ask the participants to determine if the span of control is consistent with ICS guidelines. Allow the participants time to respond. If not mentioned, point out that the span of control is NOT consistent with ICS guidelines. Remind them that ICS span of control for any supervisor is between 3 and 7 subordinates and optimally does not exceed 5 subordinates.

    38. Remember . . . Modular Organization! Use the ICS feature of modular organization to maintain the optimal span of control! Instructor Notes: Emphasize that the participants should use the ICS feature of modular organization to maintain the optimal span of control. Point out that in the chart on the visual, the Operations Section Chief has two groups reporting to him or her, and each group has only four resources under it. Because the ICS organization develops in a bottom-up modular fashion, you can add positions as the needs of the incident grow and still maintain an optimal span of control. Note that the participants will learn more about the standard ICS organizational structures in the next units. Instructor Notes: Emphasize that the participants should use the ICS feature of modular organization to maintain the optimal span of control. Point out that in the chart on the visual, the Operations Section Chief has two groups reporting to him or her, and each group has only four resources under it. Because the ICS organization develops in a bottom-up modular fashion, you can add positions as the needs of the incident grow and still maintain an optimal span of control. Note that the participants will learn more about the standard ICS organizational structures in the next units.

    39. Five Major Management Functions Instructor Notes: There are five major management functions that are the foundation upon which the ICS organization develops. These functions apply whether you are handling a routine emergency, organizing for a major non-emergency event, or managing a response to a major disaster. Incident Command: Sets the incident objectives, strategies, and priorities and has overall responsibility at the incident or event. Operations: Conducts tactical operations to carry out the plan. Develops the tactical objectives and organization, and directs all tactical resources. Planning: Prepares and documents the Incident Action Plan to accomplish the objectives, collects and evaluates information, maintains resource status, and maintains documentation for incident records. Logistics: Provides support, resources, and all other services needed to meet the operational objectives. Finance/Administration: Monitors costs related to the incident. Provides accounting, procurement, time recording, and cost analyses.Instructor Notes: There are five major management functions that are the foundation upon which the ICS organization develops. These functions apply whether you are handling a routine emergency, organizing for a major non-emergency event, or managing a response to a major disaster. Incident Command: Sets the incident objectives, strategies, and priorities and has overall responsibility at the incident or event. Operations: Conducts tactical operations to carry out the plan. Develops the tactical objectives and organization, and directs all tactical resources. Planning: Prepares and documents the Incident Action Plan to accomplish the objectives, collects and evaluates information, maintains resource status, and maintains documentation for incident records. Logistics: Provides support, resources, and all other services needed to meet the operational objectives. Finance/Administration: Monitors costs related to the incident. Provides accounting, procurement, time recording, and cost analyses.

    40. Incident Commander The Incident Commander performs all major ICS command and staff responsibilities unless the ICS functions are delegated and assigned. Instructor Notes: During small incidents and events, one person, the Incident Commander, may accomplish all five management functions. In fact, the Incident Commander is the only position that is always staffed in ICS applications. ICS operating guidelines state that the first IC is responsible until the authority is delegated to another person. Thus on smaller incidents when additional person are not required, the IC will personally accomplish or manage all aspects of the incident organization. Large incidents or events may require that these functions be set up as separate Sections within the organization. The Incident Commander decides when it is time to expand the organization based upon the incident.Instructor Notes: During small incidents and events, one person, the Incident Commander, may accomplish all five management functions. In fact, the Incident Commander is the only position that is always staffed in ICS applications. ICS operating guidelines state that the first IC is responsible until the authority is delegated to another person. Thus on smaller incidents when additional person are not required, the IC will personally accomplish or manage all aspects of the incident organization. Large incidents or events may require that these functions be set up as separate Sections within the organization. The Incident Commander decides when it is time to expand the organization based upon the incident.

    41. Incident Commander: Delegating A short video illustrating how effective delegation can make all the difference. Terry Tate video.A short video illustrating how effective delegation can make all the difference. Terry Tate video.

    42. Incident Commander Upon notification of an incident, the higher ranking person will either assume command, maintain command as is, or transfer command to a third party. Instructor Notes: Ensure the students understand: Upon notification of an incident, the higher ranking person will either assume command, maintain command as is, or transfer command to a third party. In some situations or agencies, a lower ranking but more qualified person may be designated as the Incident Commander.Instructor Notes: Ensure the students understand: Upon notification of an incident, the higher ranking person will either assume command, maintain command as is, or transfer command to a third party. In some situations or agencies, a lower ranking but more qualified person may be designated as the Incident Commander.

    43. Incident Commander Roles Instructor Notes: Explain what the Incident Commanders Roles are: Provides overall leadership for incident response within the hospital. Delegates authority to others. May take general direction from the administrator/official. Instructor Notes: Explain what the Incident Commanders Roles are: Provides overall leadership for incident response within the hospital. Delegates authority to others. May take general direction from the administrator/official.

    44. Incident Commander Responsibilities Instructor Notes: Explain the Incident Commanders Responsibilities: Is responsible for all activities and functions until delegated and assigned to staff. Assesses need for staff. Establishes incident objectives. Directs staff to develop the Incident Action Plan. Instructor Notes: Explain the Incident Commanders Responsibilities: Is responsible for all activities and functions until delegated and assigned to staff. Assesses need for staff. Establishes incident objectives. Directs staff to develop the Incident Action Plan.

    45. Changing Incident Commanders Command may change to meet the needs of the incident when incidents: Expand or contract. Change in jurisdiction or discipline. Become more or less complex. Instructor Notes: Explain that command may change to meet the needs of the incident when incidents: Expand or contract. Change in jurisdiction or discipline. Become more or less complex. Instructor Notes: Explain that command may change to meet the needs of the incident when incidents: Expand or contract. Change in jurisdiction or discipline. Become more or less complex.

    46. Transfer of Command Transfer of command requires: A transfer of command briefing for the incoming Incident Commander. Notification to all personnel that a change in command is taking place. Instructor Notes: Explains that transfer of command requires: A transfer of command briefing for the incoming Incident Commander. Notification to all personnel that a change in command is taking place. Instructor Notes: Explains that transfer of command requires: A transfer of command briefing for the incoming Incident Commander. Notification to all personnel that a change in command is taking place.

    47. Command Staff It may be necessary for the Incident Commander to designate a Command Staff who: Provide information, liaison, and safety services for the entire organization. Report directly to the Incident Commander. Instructor Notes: Depending upon the size and type of incident or event, it may be necessary for the Incident Commander to designate personnel to provide information, safety, and liaison services for the entire organization. In ICS, these personnel make up the Command Staff and consist of the: Public Information Officer serves as the conduit for information to internal and external stakeholders, including the media or other organizations seeking information directly from the incident or event. Safety Officer monitors safety conditions and develops measures for assuring the safety of all assigned personnel. Liaison Officer serves as the primary contact for supporting agencies assisting at an incident. Instructor Notes: Depending upon the size and type of incident or event, it may be necessary for the Incident Commander to designate personnel to provide information, safety, and liaison services for the entire organization. In ICS, these personnel make up the Command Staff and consist of the: Public Information Officer serves as the conduit for information to internal and external stakeholders, including the media or other organizations seeking information directly from the incident or event. Safety Officer monitors safety conditions and develops measures for assuring the safety of all assigned personnel. Liaison Officer serves as the primary contact for supporting agencies assisting at an incident.

    48. Public Speaking Aint Easy A short video illustrating how even someone with a lot of speaking experience can still make mistakes. The need for a good PIO.A short video illustrating how even someone with a lot of speaking experience can still make mistakes. The need for a good PIO.

    49. Understanding the General Staff Instructor Notes: Expansion of the incident may also require the delegation of authority for the performance of the other management functions. Point out that the people who perform the other four management functions are designated as the General Staff. The General Staff is made up of four Sections: Operations, Planning, Logistics, and Finance/Administration. Instructor Notes: Expansion of the incident may also require the delegation of authority for the performance of the other management functions. Point out that the people who perform the other four management functions are designated as the General Staff. The General Staff is made up of four Sections: Operations, Planning, Logistics, and Finance/Administration.

    50. Operations Section Directs and coordinates all tactical operations. Is typically one of the first sections to be assigned. Develops from the bottom up. Has the most incident resources. May have Staging Areas and special organizations. Instructor Notes: Explain that the Operations Section is responsible for: Directs and coordinates all tactical operations. Is typically one of the first sections to be assigned. Develops from the bottom up. Has the most incident resources. May have Staging Areas and special organizations. Instructor Notes: Explain that the Operations Section is responsible for: Directs and coordinates all tactical operations. Is typically one of the first sections to be assigned. Develops from the bottom up. Has the most incident resources. May have Staging Areas and special organizations.

    51. Operations Section Chief Roles Develop and manage the Operations Section. Develops and implements strategies and tactics. Work very closely with other members of the Command and General Staff to coordinate tactical activities. Instructor Notes: Until Operations is established as a separate Section, the Incident Commander has direct control of tactical resources. The Incident Commander will determine the need for a separate Operations Section at an incident or event. When the Incident Commander activates the Operations Section, he or she will assign an individual to be the Operations Section Chief. The roles of the Operations Section Chief include: Developing and managing the Operations Section to accomplish the incident objectives set by the Incident Commander. The Operations Section Chief is normally the person with the greatest technical and tactical expertise in dealing with the problem at hand. Responsibility for developing and implementing strategies and tactics to carry out the incident objectives. The Operations Section Chiefs responsibilities include organizing, assigning, and supervising all of the tactical field resources assigned to an incident, including air operations and those resources in a staging area. The Operations Section Chief works very closely with other members of the Command and General Staff to coordinate tactical activities. The Operations function is where the tactical fieldwork is done. Therefore, most incident resources are assigned to the Operations Section. Often, the most hazardous activities are carried out there. Because of this, it is necessary to monitor carefully the number of resources that report to any one supervisor. Instructor Notes: Until Operations is established as a separate Section, the Incident Commander has direct control of tactical resources. The Incident Commander will determine the need for a separate Operations Section at an incident or event. When the Incident Commander activates the Operations Section, he or she will assign an individual to be the Operations Section Chief. The roles of the Operations Section Chief include: Developing and managing the Operations Section to accomplish the incident objectives set by the Incident Commander. The Operations Section Chief is normally the person with the greatest technical and tactical expertise in dealing with the problem at hand. Responsibility for developing and implementing strategies and tactics to carry out the incident objectives. The Operations Section Chiefs responsibilities include organizing, assigning, and supervising all of the tactical field resources assigned to an incident, including air operations and those resources in a staging area. The Operations Section Chief works very closely with other members of the Command and General Staff to coordinate tactical activities. The Operations function is where the tactical fieldwork is done. Therefore, most incident resources are assigned to the Operations Section. Often, the most hazardous activities are carried out there. Because of this, it is necessary to monitor carefully the number of resources that report to any one supervisor.

    52. Operations Section Expanding Instructor Notes: The Incident Commander or Operations Section Chief at an incident may work initially with only a few single resources or staff members. The Operations Section usually develops from the bottom up. The organization will expand to include needed levels of supervision as more and more resources are deployed. During an incident, there may be hundreds of resources deployed to the Operations Section, and the Operations Section Chief cannot manage all of these resources directly. Trying to do so would result in inefficient resource management at best and personal injury at worst. While there are a number of ways to use field resources, the Operations Section Chief might decide to use Branches for each agency, as well as Groups, to organize resources and maintain the recommended span of control of one supervisor to five resources. It is important to maintain an effective span of control. Maintaining span of control can be done easily by grouping resources into Divisions or Groups. Another way to add supervision levels is to create Branches within the Operations Section. At some point, the Operations Section and the rest of the ICS organization will contract. The decision to contract will be based on the achievement of tactical objectives. Demobilization planning begins upon activation of the first personnel and continues until the ICS organization ceases operation. Instructor Notes: The Incident Commander or Operations Section Chief at an incident may work initially with only a few single resources or staff members. The Operations Section usually develops from the bottom up. The organization will expand to include needed levels of supervision as more and more resources are deployed. During an incident, there may be hundreds of resources deployed to the Operations Section, and the Operations Section Chief cannot manage all of these resources directly. Trying to do so would result in inefficient resource management at best and personal injury at worst. While there are a number of ways to use field resources, the Operations Section Chief might decide to use Branches for each agency, as well as Groups, to organize resources and maintain the recommended span of control of one supervisor to five resources. It is important to maintain an effective span of control. Maintaining span of control can be done easily by grouping resources into Divisions or Groups. Another way to add supervision levels is to create Branches within the Operations Section. At some point, the Operations Section and the rest of the ICS organization will contract. The decision to contract will be based on the achievement of tactical objectives. Demobilization planning begins upon activation of the first personnel and continues until the ICS organization ceases operation.

    53. Operations Section: Single Resources Single Resources may be: Individuals. A piece of equipment and its personnel complement. A crew or team of individuals with an identified supervisor. Instructor Notes: Explain that Single Resources may be: Individuals. A piece of equipment and its personnel complement. A crew or team of individuals with an identified supervisor. Instructor Notes: Explain that Single Resources may be: Individuals. A piece of equipment and its personnel complement. A crew or team of individuals with an identified supervisor.

    54. The Right Single Resource for the Job A short video illustrating how the right single resource can make all the difference. Trunk Monkey.A short video illustrating how the right single resource can make all the difference. Trunk Monkey.

    55. Operations Section: Strike Teams Instructor Notes: Explain that Strike Teams are: Strike Teams are a set number of resources of the same kind and type with common communications operating under the direct supervision of a Strike Team Leader. Instructor Notes: Explain that Strike Teams are: Strike Teams are a set number of resources of the same kind and type with common communications operating under the direct supervision of a Strike Team Leader.

    56. Operations Section: Task Forces Instructor Notes: Explain what a Task Force is: Task Forces are a combination of mixed resources with common communications operating under the direct supervision of a Task Force Leader. Instructor Notes: Explain what a Task Force is: Task Forces are a combination of mixed resources with common communications operating under the direct supervision of a Task Force Leader.

    57. Maintaining Span of Control The following supervisory levels can be added to help manage span of control: Instructor Notes: Explain what each element is: Division: Used to divide an incident geographically. The person in charge of each Division is designated as a Supervisor. Group: Used to describe functional areas of operations. The person in charge of each Group is designated as a Supervisor. Branch: Used when the number of Divisions or Groups exceeds the span of control. Can be either geographical or functional. The person in charge of each Branch is designated as a Director.Instructor Notes: Explain what each element is: Division: Used to divide an incident geographically. The person in charge of each Division is designated as a Supervisor. Group: Used to describe functional areas of operations. The person in charge of each Group is designated as a Supervisor. Branch: Used when the number of Divisions or Groups exceeds the span of control. Can be either geographical or functional. The person in charge of each Branch is designated as a Director.

    58. Operations Section: Divisions & Groups Divisions and Groups: Can be used together on an incident. Are at an equal level in the organization. One does not supervise the other. Instructor Notes: Explain Divisions and Groups: Can be used together on an incident. Are at an equal level in the organization. One does not supervise the other. Instructor Notes: Explain Divisions and Groups: Can be used together on an incident. Are at an equal level in the organization. One does not supervise the other.

    59. Operations Section: Branches Established if the number of Divisions or Groups exceeds the span of control. Have functional or geographical responsibility for major parts of the operations. Identified by Roman numerals or functional name. Managed by a Branch Director. Instructor Notes: Explain why Branches are established: Established if the number of Divisions or Groups exceeds the span of control. Have functional or geographical responsibility for major parts of the operations. Identified by Roman numerals or functional name. Managed by a Branch Director. Instructor Notes: Explain why Branches are established: Established if the number of Divisions or Groups exceeds the span of control. Have functional or geographical responsibility for major parts of the operations. Identified by Roman numerals or functional name. Managed by a Branch Director.

    60. The Planning Section Instructor Notes: The Incident Commander will determine if there is a need for a Planning Section and designate a Planning Section Chief. If no Planning Section is established, the Incident Commander will perform all planning functions. It is up to the Planning Section Chief to activate any needed additional staffing.Instructor Notes: The Incident Commander will determine if there is a need for a Planning Section and designate a Planning Section Chief. If no Planning Section is established, the Incident Commander will perform all planning functions. It is up to the Planning Section Chief to activate any needed additional staffing.

    61. Planning Section Chief Roles Organize and direct all aspects of Planning Section operations. Ensure the distribution of critical information/data. Compile scenario/resource projections from all section chiefs and effect long range planning. Document and distribute facility Incident Action Plan. Instructor Notes: Responsibilities of the Planning Section Chief: Gathering and analyzing information. Gathering, analyzing, and disseminating of intelligence and information. Managing the planning process. Compiling the Incident Action Plan. Developing a written Incident Action Plan (usually done for large incidents, and when the Incident Commander has directed). Managing the activities of Technical Specialists. Working closely with the Incident Commander and other members of the General Staff to be sure that information is shared effectively and results in an efficient planning process to meet the needs of the Incident Commander and Operations.Instructor Notes: Responsibilities of the Planning Section Chief: Gathering and analyzing information. Gathering, analyzing, and disseminating of intelligence and information. Managing the planning process. Compiling the Incident Action Plan. Developing a written Incident Action Plan (usually done for large incidents, and when the Incident Commander has directed). Managing the activities of Technical Specialists. Working closely with the Incident Commander and other members of the General Staff to be sure that information is shared effectively and results in an efficient planning process to meet the needs of the Incident Commander and Operations.

    62. Planning Section: Units Instructor Notes: The Planning Section can be further staffed with Units. Examples include: Resources Situation Documentation Demobilization In addition, Technical Specialists who provide special expertise useful in incident management and response may also be assigned to work in the Planning Section. Depending on the needs, Technical Specialists may also be assigned to other Sections in the organization. Instructor Notes: The Planning Section can be further staffed with Units. Examples include: Resources Situation Documentation Demobilization In addition, Technical Specialists who provide special expertise useful in incident management and response may also be assigned to work in the Planning Section. Depending on the needs, Technical Specialists may also be assigned to other Sections in the organization.

    63. Resource Unit Instructor Notes: Explain the Resource Units responsibilities: Tracks the status of personnel and material resources that are being utilized in various locations of the hospital. Instructor Notes: Explain the Resource Units responsibilities: Tracks the status of personnel and material resources that are being utilized in various locations of the hospital.

    64. Situation Unit Instructor Notes: Explain the responsibilities of the Situation Unit: Maintain current information regarding the incident status for all hospital staff. Ensure a written record of the hospital's emergency planning and response. Instructor Notes: Explain the responsibilities of the Situation Unit: Maintain current information regarding the incident status for all hospital staff. Ensure a written record of the hospital's emergency planning and response.

    65. Documentation Unit Instructor Notes: The Documentation Unit: Provides duplication services, including the written Incident Action Plan. Maintains and archives all incident-related documentation. Instructor Notes: The Documentation Unit: Provides duplication services, including the written Incident Action Plan. Maintains and archives all incident-related documentation.

    66. Demobilization Unit Instructor Notes: The Demob Unit: Assists in ensuring that resources are released from the incident in an orderly, safe, and cost-effective manner. Instructor Notes: The Demob Unit: Assists in ensuring that resources are released from the incident in an orderly, safe, and cost-effective manner.

    67. Technical Specialists Provide special expertise useful in incident management and response. May be assigned to work in the Planning Section or in other Sections. Instructor Notes: Technical Specialists: Provide special expertise useful in incident management and response. May be assigned to work in the Planning Section or in other Sections. Examples of a Technical Specialist: Training Specialist Public Health Nurse Lab Tech Instructor Notes: Technical Specialists: Provide special expertise useful in incident management and response. May be assigned to work in the Planning Section or in other Sections. Examples of a Technical Specialist: Training Specialist Public Health Nurse Lab Tech

    68. The Best Laid Plans.. View the video Best Laid Plans.View the video Best Laid Plans.

    69. Logistics Section Instructor Notes: The Incident Commander will determine if there is a need for a Logistics Section at the incident, and designate an individual to fill the position of the Logistics Section Chief. If no Logistics Section is established, the Incident Commander will perform all logistical functions. The size of the incident, complexity of support needs, and the incident length will determine whether a separate Logistics Section is established. Additional staffing is the responsibility of the Logistics Section Chief. Instructor Notes: The Incident Commander will determine if there is a need for a Logistics Section at the incident, and designate an individual to fill the position of the Logistics Section Chief. If no Logistics Section is established, the Incident Commander will perform all logistical functions. The size of the incident, complexity of support needs, and the incident length will determine whether a separate Logistics Section is established. Additional staffing is the responsibility of the Logistics Section Chief.

    70. Logistics Section Chief Responsibilities include: Acquiring resources from internal and external sources. Use standard and emergency acquisition procedures to acquire. Make requests to the local EOC or the HCC for assistance when needed. Instructor Notes: The Logistics Section Chief assists the Incident Commander by providing the resources and services required to support incident activities. He or she will coordinate activities very closely with the other members of the Command and General Staff. The Logistics Section develops several portions of the written Incident Action Plan and forwards them to the Planning Section. Logistics and Finance have to work closely to contract for and purchase goods and services needed at the incident. Responsibilities include: Acquiring resources from internal and external sources. Use standard and emergency acquisition procedures to acquire. Make requests to the local EOC or the HCC for assistance when needed. Instructor Notes: The Logistics Section Chief assists the Incident Commander by providing the resources and services required to support incident activities. He or she will coordinate activities very closely with the other members of the Command and General Staff. The Logistics Section develops several portions of the written Incident Action Plan and forwards them to the Planning Section. Logistics and Finance have to work closely to contract for and purchase goods and services needed at the incident. Responsibilities include: Acquiring resources from internal and external sources. Use standard and emergency acquisition procedures to acquire. Make requests to the local EOC or the HCC for assistance when needed.

    71. Logistics Section Instructor Notes: Responsibilities of the Logistics Section regarding the services and support needs: Obtaining, maintaining, and accounting for essential personnel, equipment, and supplies. Providing communication planning and resources. Setting up food services. Setting up and maintaining incident facilities. Providing support transportation. Providing medical services to incident personnel The Log Chief is responsible for seeing that all of these needs are met. If necessary, the Section may be divided into the pictured branches and units.Instructor Notes: Responsibilities of the Logistics Section regarding the services and support needs: Obtaining, maintaining, and accounting for essential personnel, equipment, and supplies. Providing communication planning and resources. Setting up food services. Setting up and maintaining incident facilities. Providing support transportation. Providing medical services to incident personnel The Log Chief is responsible for seeing that all of these needs are met. If necessary, the Section may be divided into the pictured branches and units.

    72. Logistics Section: Communications Unit Organize and coordinate internal and external communications; act as custodian of all logged and documented communications. Prepare ICS Form 205 Incident Communications Plan. Instructor Notes: The Communications Unit: Organize and coordinate internal and external communications; act as custodian of all logged and documented communications. Prepare ICS Form 205 Incident Communications Plan. Instructor Notes: The Communications Unit: Organize and coordinate internal and external communications; act as custodian of all logged and documented communications. Prepare ICS Form 205 Incident Communications Plan.

    73. Cell Phones Are Dangerous! Communications are critical to coordination. Sometimes, cell phones are not the best tool for communicating. Sometimes, they can be downright dangerous! Communications are critical to coordination. Sometimes, cell phones are not the best tool for communicating. Sometimes, they can be downright dangerous!

    74. Logistics Section: Staff Food Unit Organize food and water storage for preparation and rationing during periods of anticipated or actual shortages. Estimate the number of meals which can be served utilizing existing food stores; implement rationing if situation dictates. Inventory the current emergency drinking water supply and estimate time when re-supply will be necessary. Implement rationing if situation dictates. Report inventory levels of emergency drinking water and food stores to Logistics Section Chief. Instructor Notes: The Food Unit: Organize food and water storage for preparation and rationing during periods of anticipated or actual shortages. Estimate the number of meals which can be served utilizing existing food stores; implement rationing if situation dictates. Inventory the current emergency drinking water supply and estimate time when re-supply will be necessary. Implement rationing if situation dictates. Report inventory levels of emergency drinking water and food stores to Logistics Section Chief. Instructor Notes: The Food Unit: Organize food and water storage for preparation and rationing during periods of anticipated or actual shortages. Estimate the number of meals which can be served utilizing existing food stores; implement rationing if situation dictates. Inventory the current emergency drinking water supply and estimate time when re-supply will be necessary. Implement rationing if situation dictates. Report inventory levels of emergency drinking water and food stores to Logistics Section Chief.

    75. Food Unit: Hands-On Logistics Use the Bear and the Salmon video.Use the Bear and the Salmon video.

    76. Logistics Section: Supply Unit Assists in determining the type and amount of supplies needed to support the incident. Orders, receives, stores, and distributes supplies. Services nonexpendable equipment. Places resource orders. Maintains inventory of supplies and equipment. Instructor Notes: The Supply Unit: Assists in determining the type and amount of supplies needed to support the incident. Orders, receives, stores, and distributes supplies. Services nonexpendable equipment. Places resource orders. Maintains inventory of supplies and equipment. Instructor Notes: The Supply Unit: Assists in determining the type and amount of supplies needed to support the incident. Orders, receives, stores, and distributes supplies. Services nonexpendable equipment. Places resource orders. Maintains inventory of supplies and equipment.

    77. Logistics Section: Facilities Unit Sets up and maintains facilities. Maintain the integrity of the physical facility. Provide adequate environmental controls to perform the medical mission. Provides facility security and maintenance services (sanitation, lighting, cleanup). Instructor Notes: The Facilities Unit: Sets up and maintains facilities. Maintain the integrity of the physical facility. Provide adequate environmental controls to perform the medical mission. Provides facility security and maintenance services (sanitation, lighting, cleanup). Instructor Notes: The Facilities Unit: Sets up and maintains facilities. Maintain the integrity of the physical facility. Provide adequate environmental controls to perform the medical mission. Provides facility security and maintenance services (sanitation, lighting, cleanup).

    78. Logistics Section: Transportation Unit Organize and coordinate the transportation of all casualties, ambulatory and non-ambulatory. Arrange for the transportation of human and material resources to and from the facility. Instructor Notes: The Transportation Unit: Organize and coordinate the transportation of all casualties, ambulatory and non-ambulatory. Arrange for the transportation of human and material resources to and from the facility. Instructor Notes: The Transportation Unit: Organize and coordinate the transportation of all casualties, ambulatory and non-ambulatory. Arrange for the transportation of human and material resources to and from the facility.

    79. Why Men Dont Ask For Directions! Sometimes the Transportation/Ground Support unit will also determine routes for certain transportations functions, just as long as they dont have to ask for directions.Sometimes the Transportation/Ground Support unit will also determine routes for certain transportations functions, just as long as they dont have to ask for directions.

    80. Finance/Admin Section Instructor Notes: The Incident Commander will determine if there is a need for a Finance/Administration Section at the incident and designate an individual to fill the position of the Finance/Administration Section Chief. Instructor Notes: The Incident Commander will determine if there is a need for a Finance/Administration Section at the incident and designate an individual to fill the position of the Finance/Administration Section Chief.

    81. Finance/Admin Section Chief: Roles Is responsible for financial and cost analysis. Oversees contract negotiations. Tracks personnel and equipment time. Processes claims for accidents and injuries. Works with Logistics to ensure resources are procured. Oversee the acquisition of supplies and services necessary to carry out the hospital's medical mission. Supervise the documentation of expenditures relevant to the emergency incident. Instructor Notes: The Finance/Administration Section Chief is the one who worries about paying for the response efforts. He or she is responsible for all of the financial and cost analysis aspects of an incident. These include contract negotiation, tracking personnel and equipment time, documenting and processing claims for accidents and injuries occurring at the incident, and keeping a running tally of the costs associated with the incident. The Finance/Administration Chief will coordinate with all members of the Command and General Staff, but works most closely with Logistics to be sure that all resources needed to manage the incident are contracted and procured. Finance Chiefs Roles: Is responsible for financial and cost analysis. Oversees contract negotiations. Tracks personnel and equipment time. Processes claims for accidents and injuries. Works with Logistics to ensure resources are procured. Oversee the acquisition of supplies and services necessary to carry out the hospital's medical mission. Supervise the documentation of expenditures relevant to the emergency incident.Instructor Notes: The Finance/Administration Section Chief is the one who worries about paying for the response efforts. He or she is responsible for all of the financial and cost analysis aspects of an incident. These include contract negotiation, tracking personnel and equipment time, documenting and processing claims for accidents and injuries occurring at the incident, and keeping a running tally of the costs associated with the incident. The Finance/Administration Chief will coordinate with all members of the Command and General Staff, but works most closely with Logistics to be sure that all resources needed to manage the incident are contracted and procured. Finance Chiefs Roles: Is responsible for financial and cost analysis. Oversees contract negotiations. Tracks personnel and equipment time. Processes claims for accidents and injuries. Works with Logistics to ensure resources are procured. Oversee the acquisition of supplies and services necessary to carry out the hospital's medical mission. Supervise the documentation of expenditures relevant to the emergency incident.

    82. Finance/Admin Section: Major Activities Contract Negotiation and monitoring. Timekeeping. Cost Analysis. Compensation for injury or damage to property. Instructor Notes: Because of the large scope of some incidents, the number of agencies involved, and the amount of financial activity it will generate, the Finance/Administration Section Chief might need to activate all four units that report to him or her. These include the Time, Cost, Compensation and Claims, and Procurement Units. Provide the following key responsibilities of the Finance/Administration Section: Personnel check in and check out of incident. Contract negotiation and monitoring Timekeeping Cost analysis Compensation for injury or damage to property Larger incidents are using a Finance/Administration Section to monitor costs. Smaller incidents may also require certain Finance/Administration support. For example, the Incident Commander may establish one or more Units of the Finance/Administration Section for such things as procuring special equipment, contracting with a vendor, or making cost estimates for alternative response strategies.Instructor Notes: Because of the large scope of some incidents, the number of agencies involved, and the amount of financial activity it will generate, the Finance/Administration Section Chief might need to activate all four units that report to him or her. These include the Time, Cost, Compensation and Claims, and Procurement Units. Provide the following key responsibilities of the Finance/Administration Section: Personnel check in and check out of incident. Contract negotiation and monitoring Timekeeping Cost analysis Compensation for injury or damage to property Larger incidents are using a Finance/Administration Section to monitor costs. Smaller incidents may also require certain Finance/Administration support. For example, the Incident Commander may establish one or more Units of the Finance/Administration Section for such things as procuring special equipment, contracting with a vendor, or making cost estimates for alternative response strategies.

    83. General Staff Functions: Case Study (1 of 7) Instructions: Read the scenario below and then answer the question. The Scenario: At 8:30 p.m. on a chilly autumn day, an individual calls 911 to report a school bus has just collided with a concrete mixer. There are multiple serious injuries. This incident has been monitored at the Emergency Department. Who will assume the role of Incident Commander at the Hospital? Instructions: Read the scenario below and then answer the question. The Scenario: At 8:30 p.m. on a chilly autumn day, an individual calls 911 to report a school bus has just collided with a concrete mixer. There are multiple serious injuries. This incident has been monitored at the Emergency Department. Who will assume the role of Incident Commander at the Hospital? Charge Nurse or House Supervisor. Instructions: Read the scenario below and then answer the question.

    84. General Staff Functions: Case Study (2 of 7) The Scenario Continues: The Administrator on-call arrives at the hospital at the same time the local news arrives. What must happen before the Administrator on-call assumes the role of Incident Commander? The Scenario Continues: The Administrator on-call arrives at the hospital at the same time the local news arrives. What must happen before the Administrator on-call assumes the role of Incident Commander? Transfer of Command Briefing The Scenario Continues:

    85. General Staff Functions: Case Study (3 of 7) The Scenario Continues: A transfer of command briefing occurs and the Administrator on-call assumes the Incident Commander role. All Command Staff positions are filled. The Scenario Continues: A transfer of command briefing occurs and the Administrator on-call assumes the Incident Commander role. All Command Staff positions are filled. What is the correct title of the Command Staff member who will manage the media and ensure that the correct messages are communicated? PIO The Scenario Continues:

    86. General Staff Functions: Case Study (4 of 7) The Scenario Continues: The Incident Commander establishes an Operations Section. Within Medical Care, a special element for Triage has been established with identical resources, common communications, and operating under the direct supervision of a Leader. The Scenario Continues: The Incident Commander establishes an Operations Section. Within Medical Care, a special element for Triage has been established with identical resources, common communications, and operating under the direct supervision of a Leader. What is the correct title of this organizational element? Strike Team The Scenario Continues: The Incident Commander establishes an Operations Section. Within Medical Care, a special element for Triage has been established with identical resources, common communications, and operating under the direct supervision of a Leader. What is the correct title of this organizational element? Strike Team

    87. General Staff Functions: Case Study (5 of 7) The Scenario Continues: After the first hour, the Incident Commander establishes a second Section that will develop the Incident Action Plan and track the status of resources on the scene. The Scenario Continues: After the first hour, the Incident Commander establishes a second Section that will develop the Incident Action Plan and track the status of resources on the scene. What is the correct title of this Section? Planning Section The Scenario Continues: After the first hour, the Incident Commander establishes a second Section that will develop the Incident Action Plan and track the status of resources on the scene. What is the correct title of this Section? Planning Section

    88. General Staff Functions: Case Study (6 of 7) The Scenario Continues: As evening progresses , more than 25 hospital staff are on site along with significant numbers of family members. Given the number of individuals on site, there is a need to provide meals and water. The Scenario Continues: As evening progresses , more than 25 hospital staff are on site along with significant numbers of family members. Given the number of individuals on site, there is a need to provide meals and water. Which Section is responsible for providing these support resources? Logistics Section The Scenario Continues: As evening progresses , more than 25 hospital staff are on site along with significant numbers of family members. Given the number of individuals on site, there is a need to provide meals and water. Which Section is responsible for providing these support resources? Logistics Section

    89. General Staff Functions: Case Study (7 of 7) The Scenario Continues: Just before noon on the following day, all patients have been adequately treated and/or evacuated/transferred. The Scenario Continues: Just before noon on the following day, all patients have been adequately treated and/or evacuated/transferred. There is no exact answer. It will be up to the IC who is Demobilized first.The Scenario Continues: Just before noon on the following day, all patients have been adequately treated and/or evacuated/transferred. There is no exact answer. It will be up to the IC who is Demobilized first.

    90. Instructor Notes: Show the Video on Facilities. Instructor Notes: Show the Video on Facilities.

    91. Predesignated Incident Facilities Established by the Incident Commander based on the requirements and complexity of the incident. Instructor Notes: Explain what is located at each Facility. Common terminology is also used to define incident facilities, help clarify the activities that take place at a specific facility, and identify what members of the organization can be found there. Incident activities may be accomplished from a variety of facilities. Facilities will be established depending on the kind and complexity of the incident or event. It is important to know and understand the names and functions of the principal ICS facilities. Only those facilities needed for any given incident may be activated. Some incidents may require facilities not included in the standard list. The following are standard ICS incident facilities. Only those facilities needed for any given incident will be activated. The Incident Command Post (ICP) or Hospital Command Center (HCC), is the location from which the Incident Commander oversees all incident operations. There is generally only one ICP for each incident or event, but it may change locations during the event. Every incident or event must have some form of an Incident Command Post. The ICP may be located in a vehicle, trailer, tent, or within a building. The ICP will be positioned outside of the present and potential hazard zone but close enough to the incident to maintain command. (#20) Staging Areas are temporary locations at an incident where personnel and equipment are kept while waiting for tactical assignments.(#18) Staging Areas are located close enough for timely response, but far enough away to be out of the immediate impact zone. There may be more than one Staging Area at an incident. Each Staging Area should have a Staging Area Manager who reports to the Operations Section Chief or to the Incident Commander if an Operations Section has not been established. Base is the location from which primary logistics and administrative functions are coordinated and administered.(#3) The Base may be collocated with the Incident Command Post. There is only one Base per incident. Camp is the location where resources may be kept to support incident operations if a Base is not accessible to all resources.(#25) Not all incidents will have Camps. Helibase is the location from which helicopter-centered air operations are conducted. Helibases are generally used on a more long-term basis and include services like fueling and maintenance. Helispots are more temporary facilities used for loading and unloading personnel and cargo. Multiple Helispots may be used. Instructor Notes: Explain what is located at each Facility. Common terminology is also used to define incident facilities, help clarify the activities that take place at a specific facility, and identify what members of the organization can be found there. Incident activities may be accomplished from a variety of facilities. Facilities will be established depending on the kind and complexity of the incident or event. It is important to know and understand the names and functions of the principal ICS facilities. Only those facilities needed for any given incident may be activated. Some incidents may require facilities not included in the standard list. The following are standard ICS incident facilities. Only those facilities needed for any given incident will be activated. The Incident Command Post (ICP) or Hospital Command Center (HCC), is the location from which the Incident Commander oversees all incident operations. There is generally only one ICP for each incident or event, but it may change locations during the event. Every incident or event must have some form of an Incident Command Post. The ICP may be located in a vehicle, trailer, tent, or within a building. The ICP will be positioned outside of the present and potential hazard zone but close enough to the incident to maintain command. (#20) Staging Areas are temporary locations at an incident where personnel and equipment are kept while waiting for tactical assignments.(#18) Staging Areas are located close enough for timely response, but far enough away to be out of the immediate impact zone. There may be more than one Staging Area at an incident. Each Staging Area should have a Staging Area Manager who reports to the Operations Section Chief or to the Incident Commander if an Operations Section has not been established. Base is the location from which primary logistics and administrative functions are coordinated and administered.(#3) The Base may be collocated with the Incident Command Post. There is only one Base per incident. Camp is the location where resources may be kept to support incident operations if a Base is not accessible to all resources.(#25) Not all incidents will have Camps. Helibase is the location from which helicopter-centered air operations are conducted. Helibases are generally used on a more long-term basis and include services like fueling and maintenance. Helispots are more temporary facilities used for loading and unloading personnel and cargo. Multiple Helispots may be used.

    92. Common Responsibilities

    93. Only mobilize to an incident when requested or when dispatched by an appropriate authority. Make sure that you receive a complete deployment briefing. Mobilization Instructor Notes: Only Mobilize when: Only mobilize to an incident when requested or when dispatched by an appropriate authority. Make sure that you receive a complete deployment briefing. Note: The photo is of the Murrah building bombing in Oklahoma City. Note the cadre of nurses rushing into a scene where everyone else is wearing helmets and protective gear. Obviously the DO NOT CROSS tape didnt seem to get their attention. One of those nurses died after being struck on the head by debris in the rubble pile. Well intentioned but she became a part of the problem not a part of the solution. Team leaders need to be identified and they must take responsibility for the team safety by following protocol. Instructor Notes: Only Mobilize when: Only mobilize to an incident when requested or when dispatched by an appropriate authority. Make sure that you receive a complete deployment briefing. Note: The photo is of the Murrah building bombing in Oklahoma City. Note the cadre of nurses rushing into a scene where everyone else is wearing helmets and protective gear. Obviously the DO NOT CROSS tape didnt seem to get their attention. One of those nurses died after being struck on the head by debris in the rubble pile. Well intentioned but she became a part of the problem not a part of the solution. Team leaders need to be identified and they must take responsibility for the team safety by following protocol.

    94. Deployment Briefing Descriptive location and response area Incident check-in location Specific assignment (e.g., position, team designation, etc.) Reporting time Communications instructions (e.g., incident frequencies) Special support requirements (e.g., facilities, equipment transportation and off-loading, etc.) Travel arrangements (if needed) Instructor Notes: If or when you are mobilized make sure you receive a Deployment Briefing: Descriptive location and response area Incident check-in location Specific assignment (e.g., position, team designation, etc.) Reporting time Communications instructions (e.g., incident frequencies) Special support requirements (e.g., facilities, equipment transportation and off-loading, etc.) Travel arrangements (if needed) Instructor Notes: If or when you are mobilized make sure you receive a Deployment Briefing: Descriptive location and response area Incident check-in location Specific assignment (e.g., position, team designation, etc.) Reporting time Communications instructions (e.g., incident frequencies) Special support requirements (e.g., facilities, equipment transportation and off-loading, etc.) Travel arrangements (if needed)

    95. Check-In at the Incident/Hospital: Purpose The check-in process helps to: Ensure personnel accountability. Track resources. Prepare personnel for assignments and reassignments. Locate personnel in case of an emergency. Establish personnel time records and payroll documentation. Plan for releasing personnel. Organize the demobilization process. Instructor Notes: Check-in officially logs you in at the incident. The check-in process and information helps to: Ensure personnel accountability. Track resources. Prepare personnel for assignments and reassignments. Locate personnel in case of an emergency. Establish personnel time records and payroll documentation. Plan for releasing personnel. Organize the demobilization process. Instructor Notes: Check-in officially logs you in at the incident. The check-in process and information helps to: Ensure personnel accountability. Track resources. Prepare personnel for assignments and reassignments. Locate personnel in case of an emergency. Establish personnel time records and payroll documentation. Plan for releasing personnel. Organize the demobilization process.

    96. Check-In at the Incident: Procedures Check in only once at an authorized location: At the Incident Command Post At the Base or Camp(s) At the Staging Areas At the Helibase With the Division/Group Supervisor Check-in information is usually recorded on ICS Form 211, Check-In List. Instructor Notes: Check in only once at an authorized location: At the Incident Command Post At the Base or Camp(s) At the Staging Areas At the Helibase With the Division/Group Supervisor Check-in information is usually recorded on ICS Form 211, Check-In List. Instructor Notes: Check in only once at an authorized location: At the Incident Command Post At the Base or Camp(s) At the Staging Areas At the Helibase With the Division/Group Supervisor Check-in information is usually recorded on ICS Form 211, Check-In List.

    97. Initial Incident Briefing Current situation assessment and objectives Specific job responsibilities and shifts (operational periods) Location of work area Eating and sleeping arrangements Procedural instructions for obtaining additional resources Safety hazards and required safety procedures/Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), as appropriate Instructor Notes: After check-in, they will need to locate their incident supervisor and obtain their initial briefing. Explain that the briefing information helps plan their tasks and communicate with others. Briefings received and given should include: Current situation assessment. Identification of your specific job responsibilities. Identification of coworkers. Location of work area. Identification of eating and sleeping arrangements, as appropriate. Procedural instructions for obtaining additional supplies, services, and personnel. Operational periods/work shifts. Required safety procedures and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), as appropriate. Instructor Notes: After check-in, they will need to locate their incident supervisor and obtain their initial briefing. Explain that the briefing information helps plan their tasks and communicate with others. Briefings received and given should include: Current situation assessment. Identification of your specific job responsibilities. Identification of coworkers. Location of work area. Identification of eating and sleeping arrangements, as appropriate. Procedural instructions for obtaining additional supplies, services, and personnel. Operational periods/work shifts. Required safety procedures and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), as appropriate.

    98. When Demobilizing (1 of 2) Complete all work assignments and required forms/reports. Brief replacements, subordinates, and supervisor. Evaluate the performance of subordinates. Follow incident and agency check-out procedures. Provide followup contact information. Instructor Notes: Tell the students that when Demobilizing: Complete all work assignments and required forms/reports. Brief replacements, subordinates, and supervisor. Evaluate the performance of subordinates. Follow incident and agency check-out procedures. Provide follow-up contact information. Instructor Notes: Tell the students that when Demobilizing: Complete all work assignments and required forms/reports. Brief replacements, subordinates, and supervisor. Evaluate the performance of subordinates. Follow incident and agency check-out procedures. Provide follow-up contactinformation.

    99. When Demobilizing (2 of 2) Return any incident-issued equipment or other nonexpendable supplies. Complete post-incident reports, critiques, evaluations, and medical followup. Complete any administration issues. Upon arrival at home, notify the home unit (i.e., whoever is tracking you) of your arrival and ensure your readiness for your next assignment. Instructor Notes: Tell the students that when Demobilizing: Return any incident-issued equipment or other nonexpendable supplies. Complete post-incident reports, critiques, evaluations, and medical followup. Complete any administration issues. Upon arrival at home, notify the home unit (i.e., whoever is tracking you) of your arrival and ensure your readiness for your next assignment. Instructor Notes: Tell the students that when Demobilizing: Return any incident-issued equipment or other nonexpendable supplies. Complete post-incident reports, critiques, evaluations, and medical followup. Complete any administration issues. Upon arrival at home, notify the home unit (i.e., whoever is tracking you) of your arrival and ensure your readiness for your next assignment.

    100. Taking the Exam Instructions: Take a few moments to review your Student Handout and identify any questions. Make sure that you get all of your questions answered prior to beginning the final test. When taking the test . . . Read each item carefully. Circle your answer on the test. Check your work and transfer your answers to the computer-scan (bubble) answer sheet or enter the answers online. You may refer to your Student Handout when completing this test. Instructor Notes: Instructions: Pass out Test. Note: Tell the student that they will take the test in class but go online (see next slides) to complete the Final Exam for credit and a certificate. Take a few moments to review your Student Handout and identify any questions. Make sure that you get all of your questions answered prior to beginning the final test. When taking the test . . . Read each item carefully. Circle your answer on the test. Check your work and transfer your answers to the computer-scan (bubble) answer sheet or enter the answers online. You may refer to your Student Handout when completing this test. Instructor Notes: Instructions: Pass out Test. Note: Tell the student that they will take the test in class but go online (see next slides) to complete the Final Exam for credit and a certificate. Take a few moments to review your Student Handout and identify any questions. Make sure that you get all of your questions answered prior to beginning the final test. When taking the test . . . Read each item carefully. Circle your answer on the test. Check your work and transfer your answers to the computer-scan (bubble) answer sheet or enter the answers online. You may refer to your Student Handout when completing this test.

    101. Useful Sites NIMS Online http://www.nimsonline.com/ IS 100 Online Independent Study Course https://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/IS/Exams/is100tst.asp Emergency Management Institute (EMI) Independent Study Courses http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/IS/crslist.asp

    102. Useful Sites OSHA ICS eTool http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/ics/org.html Very useful ICS Site provided by OSHA.Very useful ICS Site provided by OSHA.

    103. Feedback Please complete the course evaluation form. Your comments are important!

    104. Questions/Comments? Questions?