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What is Static Electricity?

What is Static Electricity?

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What is Static Electricity?

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  1. What is Static Electricity?

  2. Static Electricity is… • A stationary build-up of electric charge (electrons) on a material • Electricity that does not move (static vs. dynamic) • Shocking!

  3. Types of Charges • Most objects are neutral – electrically uncharged • If 2 neutral objects are rubbed together, one becomes positively charged (loses electrons) and the other becomes negatively charged (gains electrons) • Direction of electron flow called the “ELECTROSTATIC SERIES”

  4. The Electrostatic Series Weak hold on electrons • Acetate • Glass • Wool • Fur/Hair • Ca, Mg, Pb • Silk • Aluminum • Zinc • Cotton • Paraffin wax • Ebonite • Plastic • C, Ni, Cu • Sulfur • Gold, Platinum Strong hold on electrons

  5. The Electrostatic Series • For example: • A plastic comb is rubbed with wool • The wool gives up electrons (weaker hold); becomes positively charged • The plastic comb takes electrons and becomes negatively charged • Acetate • Glass • Wool • Fur/Hair • Ca, Mg, Pb • Silk • Aluminum • Zinc • Cotton • Paraffin wax • Ebonite • Plastic • C, Ni, Cu • Sulfur • Gold, Platinum

  6. Let’s try another one… • Your cotton sweater rubs against your silk shirt… • Negative charge: • Cotton (gained electrons) • Positive charge: • Silk (lost electrons) • Acetate • Glass • Wool • Fur/Hair • Ca, Mg, Pb • Silk • Aluminum • Zinc • Cotton • Paraffin wax • Ebonite • Plastic • C, Ni, Cu • Sulfur • Gold, Platinum

  7. How to put static charge on an object • By Contact • Touch something with a charged object • Positively charged object will take some electrons from neutral object, making it positive too • Negatively charged object will give electrons to the neutral object, making it negative too

  8. Charging by Contact • Friction • Between any two materials • Rubbing it with something

  9. Charging by Contact • Conduction • When 2 objects with different amounts of charge come into contact • Electrons move from one object to the other

  10. How to put static charge on an object • By Induction • Bring a charged object near a neutral object without touching it • Let’s check out the electroscope!

  11. Charging by Induction • Bringing a charged rod near the electroscope will INDUCE the same charge on the silver leaf • Negative rod forces electrons down and makes the leaf negative • Positive rod attracts electrons up and makes the leaf positive