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Educational Benefit

Educational Benefit

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Educational Benefit

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  1. Educational Benefit • Educational Benefit Review Processis a process that will assist in examining & reflecting on the quality of IEP development to increase student access to, participation and progress in the general education curriculum by providing an appropriate education. • Clarification:A properly written IEP provides the blueprint for teaching. It focuses upon the factors that tend to interfere with student achievement and utilizes students’ strengths to enhance learning. In order to bring this about, the IEP must cohesively link the assessment results to effective teaching strategies.

  2. Educational Benefit:Present Levels of Performance Test Scores • This information is recorded within the grid located in the middle of page three of the IEP • Standardized and/or informal testing completed within the last year • Scores must indicate instructional level or range

  3. Present Levels of Performance • Results of evaluations, as expressed in an IEP, must be interpreted and described in language that is understandable by teachers and parents. Do NOT use clinical language on the IEP. • Describe the tasks performed • Describe the level of performance obtained • Describe any relevant specific behaviors observed during testing • Project a description of how weaknesses may affect classroom performance; e.g. Student’s weakness in auditory processing interferes with her ability to take useful notes. This projection makes it much easier to select pivotal skills goals! *For a partial list of applicable reading assessment measures see the “Practitioner’s Guide”, Fall 2007, P. 52-53.

  4. Present Levels of Performance • Example 1: (Gary is an eighth grader.) • On the calculation subtest, Gary demonstrated mastery of addition and subtraction of four digit numbers, with regrouping. He has mastered the 2, 3, 5 and 10 multiplication tables for single digits. He struggles with long division, which affects his ability to solve algebraic equations. Test results show that Gary has trouble with sequential memory. This affects his ability to easily recall basic math facts, and slows down his completion of assignments.

  5. Present Levels of Performance • Example 2: • On the reading comprehension subtest, on which he was required to provide correct answers to questions related to a passage read silently, Gary demonstrated the ability to comprehend reading material on the fifth grade level. His weakness in organizing information appears to affect comprehension. His teacher reports that Gary struggles to understand content area reading assignments, and he takes a long time to complete tests.

  6. Present Levels of Performance • Example 3: • Gary’s frustration with his difficulties in reading comprehension interferes with his ability to stay engaged during silent reading assignments in the classroom, and when his peers are responding to teacher questions related to reading material. He often attempts to distract his peers by making jokes, tries to initiate conversation, and looks for reasons to leave his desk. His behaviors escalate when rebuffed by his peers.

  7. Present Levels of Performance • Parental and student input helps to identify student strengths, interests and preferences. • Example 4: • Gary’s parents report that he enjoys building models and helping his father with home maintenance. Gary stated that he likes playing action video games. He says that he learns best when doing things with his hands. Gary says that he wants to learn how to build and fix computers as a possible career.* • * This is an example of a transition statement, required on IEPs for students 14 and older. Gary will turn 15 during this school year.

  8. Present Levels of Performance • It is important to include information about which teaching and learning strategies have been successful with Gary and which ones have not. • Example 5: • Teachers report that Gary does not respond well to independent class activities. He does not like to work alone. He operates best during small group activities in which he has opportunities to share information with and learn from his peers.

  9. Academic Management Needs This section appears on the bottom of page three of the IEP, and is critical for cohesively linking assessment results to effective teaching practices on a daily basis. Indicate the instructional modifications and resources to enable the student to succeed, e.g. • visual aids • learning styles (visual, audio, etc.) • graphic organizers / lesson outlines • books on tape/peer reader • manipulatives • calculator • (frequent) breaks • checklists • content area picklists • simplify task directions • multi-sensory approach • hands-on activities • preferential seating

  10. Academic Management Needs • While remedial programs are underway, a student must have immediate access to curriculum via accommodations and modifications. • Example: • Gary will be permitted to use a calculator in class when required to solve algebraic equations. • He will use a teacher-designed graphic organizer when reading content area text. • Gary needs to be located near the teacher during content area reading activities, for prompts and reminders to stay on task. • Whenever possible, Gary should have the option to present his completed assignments in alternate modes, agreed upon with the teacher, e.g. models (including digital) and posters. • Whenever possible, Gary should participate in a small group for classroom activities. • Reduction of task size or extra time allocated to accommodate slow processing in reading comprehension and math.

  11. Matching Present Levels of Performance to Annual Goals All areas of student needs on the IEP page 3, Present Levels of Performance, MUST be addressed on the IEP page 6 Goals.

  12. Audience PollAnnual Goals • Which statement is false? • Annual goals must address the needs of the student as described in the present levels of performance. • Annual goals should focus on pivotal skills, based on weaknesses described in the present levels of performance. • All annual goals must be based on 80% criterion of accuracy. • Annual goals are written in measurable terms that focus on one year of instruction and must be formulated to be achievable by the student.

  13. Annual Goals Goals • Address the needs of the student, as stated in the Present Levels of Performance • Are written in measurable terms that focus on one year of instruction and must be formulated to be achievable by the student • Must be relevant to class activities, and improve classroom performance • Based on pivotal skills based on weaknesses described in the Present Levels of Performance • Include clear and specific methods of measurement

  14. Annual Goals Annual Goals need to be SMART! S –Specific M –Measurable A –Achievable R –Relevant T –Time related

  15. Annual Goals: SMART! • Specific: • Describe what the student will do one year from now that s/he cannot do today. • Example: • In one year, using a sequential reading comprehension improvement program, andgiven athree-paragraph passagewritten on asixth grade level, Gary willanswer comprehension questions, as measured by five consecutive weekly comprehension tests with 90% accuracy.

  16. Annual Goals:SMART! • Measurable: • Describe the criteria to be used to measure successful achievement of the goal. • Example: • In one year, using a sequential reading comprehension improvement program, and given a three-paragraph passage written on a sixth grade level, Gary will answer comprehension questions as measured by five consecutive weekly comprehension tests with 90% accuracy.

  17. Annual Goals:SMART! • Achievable: • Looking at the student’s present levels of performance, project a goal that is attainable by the student in one year. • Example: • In one year, using a sequential reading comprehension improvement program, and given a three-paragraph passage written on a sixth grade level, Gary will answer comprehension questions as measured by five consecutive weekly comprehension tests with 90% accuracy.

  18. Annual Goals:SMART! • Relevant: • The goal must be related to class activities and improve classroom performance. • Example: • In one year, using a sequential reading comprehension improvement program, and given a three-paragraph passage written on a sixth grade level, Gary will answer comprehension questions as measured by five consecutive weekly comprehension tests with 90% accuracy.

  19. Annual Goals:SMART! • Time Related: • Describe how long the goal will take to achieve, and, when possible, embed the schedule for assessment. • Example: • In one year, using a sequential reading comprehension improvement program, and given a three-paragraph passage written on a sixth grade level, Gary will answer comprehension questions as measured by five consecutive weekly comprehension tests with 90% accuracy.

  20. Annual Goals:Transition • Transition should be addressed in the page 3 Present Levels of Performance, on page 6 Annual Goals, and on page 10 Transition for students 14 and older • Indicate the student’s needs, preferences and interests, relating to the transition (14 and older) from school to post-secondary outcomes. Example: In one year, Gary will read twenty articles from computer trade magazines, as measured by a poster chart that he will create, referencing the publications and articles, with a brief topic summary relating to each publication. Progress will be assessed quarterly by the teacher’s review of the chart.

  21. Testing Accommodations • Testing accommodations are changes made in the administration of the test in order to remove obstacles that are presented by the disability without changing the construct of the test. Not all students with IEPs require test accommodations. The rationale must appear in the Present Levels of Performance. • Example: • Gary will participate in State and City-wide tests with accommodations: Time and one-half will be permitted on all assessments.* • * This aligns with information found in Gary’s Present Levels of Performance (page 3).

  22. Educational Benefit • Now let’s see how all of this is linked together, resulting in “Educational Benefit” for Gary, and providing a blueprint for instruction.

  23. Note how strengths are incorporated into accommodations in order to “push” Gary toward achievement while goals are being implemented.

  24. Was the student’s program reasonably calculated to result in educational benefit? YES or NO?

  25. Educational Benefit: Outcome Improving Performance & Academic Achievement • Progress toward goals • Improved scores on district/statewide assessments/alternative assessment • Advancement from grade to grade • Progress in the General Education curriculum • Transition connection • OVERALL: Increased movement toward LRE Staten Island Integrated Service Center (ISC)

  26. Educational Benefit: Related Services • When reviewing Educational Benefit, consider whether or not it is in the student’s best interest to continue the current mandated related services. • Is there justification for removing the student from classroom instruction in order to receive related services? • How long (duration, frequency, group size, etc.) has the student been receiving the same related service? • Is there another option for the student to receive additional assistance/enrichment in place of the related service - Advisory, CBO, AIS, etc.? • Can the student’s need be addressed in the classroom environment without the related service?

  27. Hyperlink Resources • Standard Operating Procedures Manual • http://schools.nyc.gov/NR/rdonlyres/F1AD5E08-62A0-408A-9187-BB757C9556BA/0/SOPM.pdf • Creating A Quality IEP (IEP Manual) • http://schools.nyc.gov/NR/rdonlyres/916F2D1C-8D46-4635-A988-45D9CC13F561/0/CreatingaQualityIEP.pdf • Practitioner’s Guide with Primary Emphasis on Assessing Achievement as Part of an Evaluation for Special Education – fall 2007 • http://schools.nycenet.edu/offices/teachlearn/speced/NYC_DOE_Practitioners_Guide.pdf • Testing • Test Access and Accommodations for Students with Disabilities: Policy and Tools to Guide Decision-Making and Implementation; New York State Education Department; May 2006 http://www.vesid.nysed.gov/specialed/publications/policy/testaccess/policyguide.htm To access Archived Webcasts at LEARNING TIMES click the link below. http://www.learningtimes.net/iscrecordings Or, click the following link to participate in live webcasts: http://www.learningtimes.net/iscwebcasts

  28. Suggested Reading • How To Differentiate Instruction In Mixed-Ability Classrooms, Carol Ann Tomlinson • Pre-referral Intervention Manual,Stephen B. McCarney • Better IEPs, Barbara Bateman • From Gobbledygook to Clearly-Written Annual Goals, Barbara Bateman