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Understanding Active and Passive Floodproofing Options for Non-Residential Buildings in a Special Flood Hazard Area PowerPoint Presentation
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Understanding Active and Passive Floodproofing Options for Non-Residential Buildings in a Special Flood Hazard Area

Understanding Active and Passive Floodproofing Options for Non-Residential Buildings in a Special Flood Hazard Area

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Understanding Active and Passive Floodproofing Options for Non-Residential Buildings in a Special Flood Hazard Area

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  1. Understanding Active and Passive Floodproofing Options for Non-Residential Buildings in a Special Flood Hazard Area Course Number: SV003 Learning Units: 1 Credit Designation: HSW Provider: Smart Vent Products, Inc Provider number: T058

  2. Learning Objectives • Identify the applicable ICC building codes and FEMA regulations pertaining to non-residential floodproofing options. • Understand the design benefits for each dry floodproofing and wet floodproofing option. • Identify design issues and occupants risks associated with active flood proofing techniques and the liability associated with those risks. • Analyze the difference between Active and Passive floodproofing techniques and how they affect the buildings sustainability.

  3. Course Outline • Section 1 General Overview • Effects of hydrostatic pressure • NFIP (FEMA) Regulations, ICC building codes, ASCE standards • Define dry and wet floodproofing techniques • Active and passive methods • Section 2 Dry Floodproofing • Planning considerations & engineering requirements • Active vs Passive methods • FEMA floodproofing certificate • Designer Liability • Section 3 Wet Floodproofing • Options • Engineered vs non-engineered • ICC-ES Evaluated Products • Project Studies

  4. Section 1 • Section 1 • Effects of hydrostatic pressure • NFIP (FEMA) Regulations, ICC building codes, ASCE standards • Define dry and wet floodproofing techniques • Active and passive methods

  5. Hydrostatic Pressure

  6. The Effects of Hydrostatic Force A B C D

  7. Floodproofing Options: A Zones Dry Flood Proofing Wet Flood Proofing

  8. Dry Floodproofing (Resist) • Making a building watertight, impermeable to flood waters • NFIP allows in non-residential buildings only • For new construction or substantial improvements to existing buildings • Acceptable in A, AE, A1-A30, AO, & AH Zones • Design must be certified (Liability)

  9. Wet Floodproofing (Relieve) • Flood Vents equalize the hydrostatic pressure • NFIP allows in both residential and non-residential structures • For new construction or substantial improvements to existing buildings • Acceptable in A, AE, A1-A30, AO, & AH Zones • ICC-ES Certified Options

  10. Additional Floodplain Construction References 2009 IBC ASCE 24-05

  11. Design Plans

  12. Which To Design With? • Dry Vs Wet • Design differences and costs • Active vs Passive approaches

  13. Section 2 • Dry Floodproofing • Design requirements & materials • Active & passive flood barriers • Flood proofing certificate & liability

  14. Dry Floodproofing • Planning: Is it possible? • Considerations • Warning time, Safety & Access • Flood Velocities, Depths, and Debris • Frequency • Emergency Plan • Inspection & Maintenance Plan • Cost • Liability

  15. Warning Time, Safety & Access • Time is critical • Active flood proofing measures • Human Stability • Dry Flood Proofing is not appropriate in a flash flood area.

  16. Flood Velocities, Depths & Debris • Cost Prohibitive When • Flood Velocities are over 5 feet per second • Base Flood depths in excess of 3 feet • Impact forces from debris • Calculation assumes 1 second duration of impact • Object estimated at 1,000 pounds

  17. Flood Frequency • How often • Wear & Tear • Risks of implementing a emergency plan over and over • If frequency is not a factor, time to design

  18. Emergency Operation Plan • Establish the chain of command & responsibilities • Procedure for notifying necessary parties • A list of specific duties & location of all dry floodproofing materials • Evacuation plan- with and without duties • Annual training drills with community officials

  19. Inspection & Maintenance Plan • Mechanical equipment, sump pumps & generators • Inspect & test all flood shields (check gaskets) • Inspect foundation walls for cracks • Levees & berms

  20. Dry Floodproofing Certificate Property Address Section I: FIRM info Section II: Flood proofing design info Section III: Certification

  21. Property Address

  22. Section I & II

  23. Section III

  24. Floodplain Impact Consideration • Increased flood depths, velocities, & flows • Growing the floodplain • ASFPM: No Adverse Impact • The action of one property owner or community does not adversely affect another

  25. Section 3 • Wet Floodproofing (Passive Solution) • Engineered vs Non-engineered • ICC-ES Evaluated Products • Proper Placement

  26. Three Options • ICC-ES Certified Engineered Openings • Unique project specific Engineered Openings • Non-engineered Openings Both FEMA and the ICC reference ASCE 24. ASCE requires that flood openings allow for a 3” sphere to pass through to permit for debris.

  27. 3. Non-engineered Openings Provide 1 sq in ofnetopen area for every 1sq ft of enclosed area An 8”x16” hole with air vent device inserted does NOT provide 128 sq in! Account for obstructions to flow If I-Codes apply, 3” min dimension Liability: Design Professional, Surveyor, Construction Official 27

  28. Unacceptable Measures: Page 19 TB-1 • Standard foundation air ventilation devices that can be closed manually, unless they are disabled in the open position

  29. Unacceptable Measures: Page 19 TB-1 • Standard foundation air ventilation devices that are designed to open and close based on temperature

  30. Unacceptable Measures: Page 19 TB-1 • Windows below the BFE • Garage Doors without openings installed in them • Standard exterior doors without openings installed in them

  31. Debris is a Fact of Flood 31

  32. 3” Clarification

  33. 2. Unique Engineered Openings • Designed for a specific project • Certified based on computations (TB1 and ASCE 24) • I-Codes & ASCE 24: 3” min dimension • Not for mass distributed products • Design must be accompanied by the original certification • Liability: Licensed Design Professional

  34. Unique Engineered Opening Certificate • Statement certifying the openings will automatically equalize hydrostatic flood loads • Range of flood characteristics used • Installation requirements • Property address (must be licensed in that state) • Licensed design professionals name, title, address, type of license, license number, state in which the license was issued

  35. 1. ICC-ES Engineered Openings • Designed, Tested, & Certified for performance • Designed and certified based on computations (TB1 and ASCE 24) • ICC-ES Certifed: AC-364 (AFFV) • I-Codes & ASCE 24: 3” min dimension

  36. ICC-ES Report

  37. Liability For Performance • Rests on the manufacturer’s shoulders • Each vent is tested • Regular QA inspections

  38. Placement Requirements

  39. Placement Requirements FEMA Photo

  40. Placement Requirements 40

  41. Sloping Sites: Walk Out Basements 41

  42. Dry vs Wet • William L. Coulbourne, P.E. Floodproofing Report • Dry vs Wet Floodproofing Technologies • Two dry scenarios • Two wet scenarios • 5,000 sq. ft. spaces 4 foot BFE with 1 foot freeboard

  43. Dry Scenario 1D • 5,000 sq. ft. full height enclosed space

  44. Dry Scenario 2D • 5,000 sq. ft. crawlspace

  45. Wet Scenario 1W • 5,000 sq. ft. full height enclosed space • (13) ICC-ES certified flood vents

  46. Wet Scenario 2W • 5,000 sq. ft. crawlspace • (13) ICC-ES certified flood vents

  47. Cost Analysis

  48. Summary: Considerations • Local floodplain ordinances • Health, Safety & Welfare of the Occupants • Active vs Passive techniques • Costs • Liability

  49. Questions