for presentation to portfolio committee on 13 march 2012 ceo thulani nzima n.
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For presentation to Portfolio Committee on 13 March 2012 CEO: Thulani Nzima

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For presentation to Portfolio Committee on 13 March 2012 CEO: Thulani Nzima

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  1. Executive SummarySA TOURISM’S STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE 5-YEAR PERIOD 2012/13 – 2016/17 & HIGH-LEVEL ANNUAL PERFORMANCE PLAN & BUDGET FOR 2012/13 For presentation to Portfolio Committee on 13 March 2012 CEO: Thulani Nzima

  2. Our Mandate

  3. Invest only in selected markets to deliver volume and value Convince consumers that SA can be trusted to deliver memorable experiences Engage Stakeholders to deliver quality visitor experience that re-affirm the brand promise Work the distribution channel to promote SA Energise and empower the organisation to innovate and achieve excellence SA Tourism mandate, key business objectives and strategies effective 1 April 2011 Possible Tourism sector outcome which SAT will need to deliver against Create a thriving tourism sector by making South Africa a destination of choice Make the SA brand a Global Player in portfolio markets which will grow tourism’s trended revenue to the economy by 1.5% p.a SAT outcome Strategies to deliver outcome

  4. Linking to Government’s Key Priorities

  5. Linking Government priorities to SA Tourism priorities • Government has set five key priorities for the next five years including the creation of decent work and sustainable livelihoods, education, health, rural development including food security and land reform and the fight against crime and corruption. • These five priorities has been converted into Government’s Medium-Term Strategic Framework which highlights 10 priorities and 12 outcomes over the MTEF period. Tourism falls under the Economic Sectors and Employment Cluster, one of the 5 Government clusters and its actions appear under Outcome 4: “Decent employment through inclusive economic growth”.

  6. National Tourism Sector Strategy

  7. NTSS – Targets • Arrivals –15 million foreign arrivals by 2020. • Domestic tourists to grow by 3.4m from 14.6m in 2009 to 18m by 2020 and total trips to grow from 30m to 54m, with holiday trips increasing by 5m. • GDP – Increase tourism’s contribution to the GDP from an estimated R189.4 billion in 2009 to R499 billion by 2020. • Contribution of domestic tourism to GDP to grow to 60% from 52% in 2009. • Job creation – the tourism sector is committed to consolidating its efforts to create jobs and aims to create 225 000 jobs by 2020 – 177 000 in the tourism sector and 48 000 through direct government investment.

  8. Our Research-based Methodology

  9. The review adopts a “fresh eyes” approach by considering all the countries in the world, and filtering them based on a set of objective attractiveness criteria Approach to Portfolio Review Attractiveness Criteria 2nd Filter 1st Filter Consideration Set Salient Set 4th Filter CORE, TACTICAL, INVESTMENT & WATCHLIST MARKETS COST-BENEFIT EVALUATION & UNDERSTANDING OF MARKETING ISSUES Attractive Markets Qualitative process involving a panel discussion

  10. Key steps of the Portfolio Review Process 2nd filter 3rd filter 1st filter Exclude sub-Saharan Africa Exclude markets of less than 3 million people or GDP per capita is less than US$2,000 Top 50 markets in terms of outbound volume and value Exclude markets with less than 4 million people living in urban areas and less than 20,000 arrivals p.a. or no airlift Markets with less than 20,000 arrivals p.a. in 2008 but with airlift (strategic hubs) Exclude markets with less than 20,000 arrivals p.a. or no airlift Include all Africa land markets* Top sub-Saharan Africa markets PLUS Africa land markets Salient set 4th filter Final portfolio Core, tactical, investment and watch-list markets Application of cost-benefit evaluation How attractive are these markets in the short term and the long term? *Africa land markets are markets where more than 60% of arrivals to SA arrive by land.

  11. The results of the evaluation will illustrate the suggested core, tactical, investment and watch-list markets within each region Results of Portfolio Review Tactical markets are those which should be considered for specific, tactical opportunities Core markets are those which present the greatest opportunity • Less Attractive But Easier • Tactical Markets • Markets where there are particular opportunities, i.e. “low hanging fruit” • 15% of organisation’s effort deployed against these markets • Attractive And Easier • Core Markets • Markets that deliver the “bread & butter” • 60% of organisation’s effort deployed against these markets • Best capabilities allocated to these markets Easier to Target • Less Attractive And Difficult • Watch-list Markets • Markets that are on the radar • Activity in these markets will only occur if there is spare capacity in the organisation • 5% of organisation’s effort deployed against these markets • Attractive But Difficult • Investment Markets • Invest in these markets ahead of return, i.e. invest for the future • 20% of organisation’s effort deployed against these markets Investment markets are those where some investment is made for returns in future Watch-list markets need to be watched for value segments Attractiveness of Market

  12. The 4th Portfolio Review process will end March 2014; the 5th Portfolio Review will take place during July 2012 and fully implemented by 01/04/2014 2002 – 2004 2005 – 2007 2008 – 2010 2011-2014 4th Portfolio Country Manager Regional Director Responsibility Stakeholder Manager Global Channel Manager *Indicates Business Tourism Hubs

  13. Importance of Africa to meet NTSS targets Africa delivers the highest number of tourist arrivals • Africa delivers more than 70% of all arrivals every year • Tourist arrivals from Africa grew at ~10.3% annually from 2003–2010. Africa’s contribution to the total tourist arrivals to South Africa increased from 68.1% in 2003 to 77.0% in 2010 Africa is growing • Africa witnessed a remarkable growth in GDP and GDP per Capita (18.9% and 16.3%, respectively), from 2003–2008 • Tourist arrivals from Africa to South Africa increased at a much faster rate of 10.3%, compared to the growth of 3.3% in tourist arrivals from rest of the world, during 2003–2010 • The value that Africa brings to the South African economy goes beyond tourism (i.e., hotels and attractions), and has major benefits for the whole economy (especially in manufacturing and other downstream industries) • Africa is South Africa’s natural hinterland • Accessibility of South Africa to a significant number of travellers, particularly those in Southern African countries, and their familiarity with the country, are the major benefits • South Africa captures more than 50% of total outbound departures from African countries Africa is accessible • South Africa has the potential to further exploit its proximity and strength as a choice destination in the African market, which is still emerging from purpose-based travel into a true leisure-driven tourism market • South Africa receives a relatively small number of travellers from countries other than African countries, which implies that there is tremendous opportunity for growth Africa still represents untapped potential Source: Grail Research & Monitor Analysis

  14. Invest only in selected markets to deliver volume and value Convince consumers that SA can be trusted to deliver memorable experiences Engage Stakeholders to deliver quality visitor experience that re-affirm the brand promise Work the distribution channel to promote SA Energise and empower the organisation to innovate and achieve excellence Our Strategies to deliver on the outcome

  15. These 5 strategies have been converted to 5 Programmes to comply with the National Treasury Annual Resource Plan template: Programme 1: International Portfolio Marketing (purpose:to increase international arrivals focusing on Africa growth in particular & spend by marketing SA internationally and aggressively grow Africa) Programme 2: Head Office marketing (purpose: provision of support & toolkits for international regions to promote global visibility of SA brand & to aggressively promote a culture of domestic tourism) Programme 3: Grading of tourism products (purpose: promote word-of-mouth international and domestic marketing, following quality delivery of experiences to visiting international and domestic tourists, through the grading of tourism establishments using global best-practice grading systems and business processes) Programme 4: Head Office financial support (purpose: provision of real-time accurate financial information and business processes to ensure quality execution of approved Business Plans & Budgets while complying with policies and procedures (which will maximise our chances to maintain clean audit reports) Programme 5: Head Office administrative support (purpose: 1.provision of human resources, systems and structures to support execution of all approved Business Plans and Budgets 2. To fully implement the Convention Bureau & achieve its KPA’s)

  16. Six Strategic Orientated Goals • Annual arrivals to South Africa increase to 12 068 030 by 2015 (NTSS target) and 15 000 000 by 2020 while the number of domestic tourists per annum should increase to 16 million by 2015; • The average spend per arrival in South Africa is R 12 536 per person during the 2012 calendar year; • Become the most preferred Tourism Brand by obtaining an average positive brand awareness percentage of 79% in all the markets where Brand Tracking is done; • To deliver on the quality experience expected by the international and domestic tourist by having at least graded 6 172 tourism products in South Africa by 31 March 2013; • To continuously improve internal policies, procedures and business processes so that it supports the spending of no less than 98% or no more than 102% of its consolidated annual approved budget as well as the achievement of clean annual audit reports • To grow South Africa’s business events industry, and continuously improve the culture within the organisation by living the SAT values and thereby reduce its average annual turnover rate to no more than 10% while achieving an average score of at least 3,3 in the Deloitte Best-Company-to-Work-for survey.

  17. Strategic Outcome Orientated Goal Number 1

  18. Strategic Outcome Oriented Goal 1: To market South Africa in such a way that annual arrivals to South Africa increase to 12 068 030 by 2015 and 15 000 000 by 2020 Historic arrival targets and actual arrivals were as follows: • 2009 actual arrivals: 9 933 966 (3,6% increase over 2008 actual) • 2010 actual arrivals: 11 395 700 (14,7% increase over 2009 actual) • 2011 calendar year arrival target: 11 504 920 ( 0,96% increase over 2010 actual) • 2012 calendar year arrival target: 11 922 201 (Tourist: 8 460 226) ( 3,6% increase in arrivals over 2011 target) • 2013 calendar year arrival target: 12 343 315 ( 3,5% increase over 2012 target) • 2014 calendar year arrival target: 12 683 472 ( 2,7% increase over 2013 target) • At its September 2011 Board meeting the Board agreed that SAT must include tourist targets as well. Not having adequate data points (every 5 years for 1 year projected) to set these tourist targets, the following must be noted: •  The tourist arrival target is estimated using the annual average incidence of tourist arrivals within the visitor arrivals for 2009 and 2010. •  This method of estimation is not reliable as the number of tourist arriving each month is variable. •  The data on tourist arrivals is an estimation only and not targets.

  19. MTEF allocation to aggressively grow Africa Goal 1 Continued……

  20. Objectives to drive growth from the continent to meet NTSS targets • Increasing regional awareness of South Africa as a tourism and leisure destination. • Increase arrivals and spend from Africa to contribute to GDP and job creation. • In SADC , our market penetration is high but opportunities exist to promote repeat travel and to turn shoppers into holiday travel. • In Africa Air markets, sizable opportunity exists to attract high value business and leisure traveller. • Setting up five marketing offices in key African markets by 2020. • Implementation of regional tourism programmes.

  21. Overview – Air markets • In addition to developing each market individually, we will look at growing arrivals in key regional • markets adjacent to Kenya and Nigeria, with spillover effects from activities in the DRC East African Regional Strategy West African Quick Win Strategy Central African Spillover Effect • Kenya is a relatively small market on a standalone basis, with only ~32k arrivals in 2010 • Serving additional EAC countries, such as Uganda and Tanzania would be beneficial • Combined arrivals of over 70k • Similar consumers • Good regional integration and growth • The Nigerian market is a large, and fast growing market • Serving Ghana adds ~20k arrivals to the Nigerian market • Arrivals from Ghana are growing fast • Combined arrivals from Ghana and Nigeria represent ~81% of ECOWAS’s arrivals or ~70k arrivals • The DRC market remains an investment market • Its high tourism potential, however, warrants increased investment • Due to the proximity and high connectivity between the DRC and Congo-Brazaville, any activities in the DRC will have spillover effects into Congo-Brazaville Summary of Opportunity Key Elements of Approach • Our strategy in West Africa will include showing, in the short term, our presence in Ghana by developing critical trade and media partnerships and making very targeted investments in the market • In addition, we will build our understanding of consumers and trade in Ghana through targeted research • Finally, we will continue to monitor the market’s growth and adapt our investment decisions in the long term • Limited additional effort is required in the short to medium term as effects will automatically spill over with no additional effort • We will, however, continue to monitor Congo-Brazaville and other surrounding Central African states to leverage opportunities as they arise • Large regional market potential suggests the need to establish presence in the market rapidly • This presence will start immediately by building key relationships (e.g., media, trade, etc.) to be leveraged for winning in these markets • In the short term, we will start developing a fully-fledged regional strategy for the EAC

  22. Arrivals targets for Africa – 5 years

  23. Implementation Timeline Year 1 Years 2-3 Years 4-5 Angola Office set-up Review office set up Activity planning and development of baseline to monitor Implementation of activities and monitoring the market Review of activities DRC Development of baseline to monitor Market monitoring Market preparation Develop trade environment Start to develop consumer-facing communication Kenya Office set-up Review office set up Activity planning and development of baseline to monitor Implementation of activities and monitoring the market Review of activities Quick Wins in Uganda, Tanzania Develop and Implement Regional Strategy in the EAC Office set-up Review office set up Nigeria Activity planning and development of baseline to monitor Implementation of activities and monitoring the market Review of activities Capture Quick Wins in Ghana Develop and Implement Ghana Strategy Source: Grail Research & Monitor Analysis

  24. Strategic Outcome Orientated Goal Number 2

  25. Domestic Tourism

  26. Overall results

  27. NTSS Objectives Related to Domestic Tourism • Keeping in mind the targets set out in the NTSS, it is important to identify the most attractive segments on which to focus activation efforts Note: 1The classification of the consumer-level job required is a subjective evaluation Source: Monitor/ Grail Analysis; National Tourism Sector Strategy, February 2011, Department of Tourism, Republic of South Africa

  28. New Domestic Strategy Formulation Project Scope • Understand the current situation of the domestic tourism market in terms of: • Macro-environment analysis • Sector overview • Research and segment the South African domestic traveller population based on: • Needs and attitudes related to travel • Travel behaviour, buying process, etc. • Develop high-level marketing strategies for the prioritised segments by: • Understanding the impact of economic conditions on travel behaviour • Developing high level activation strategies to target prioritised segments • Creating message themes towards transforming tourism culture in traveller segments Project Objectives To segment South African domestic travellers into groups that share similar needs and behaviours, and provide recommendations around the marketing strategy to engage and increase participation of these segments in domestic tourism in South Africa. This would enable SAT to meet its key objectives around tourism culture transformation and growth

  29. Possible Market • The study looked at South African adults earning more than R3,000 per month. Leaving a possible market of ~8.2 Mn people to target 50 Mn1 (100% of total) Total South African population 30.3 Mn (60.6% of total) Adult population over the age of 18 years 8.2Mn2 (16.4% of total) Adults earning more than R3,000 per month (personal income) • A previous SAT study has shown that... The target market represents 8.2Mn South Africans, all over the age of 18 and earning a personal monthly income of R3,000 or more Note: 1 2010 figures; As per UNISA, 2~22 Mn people in SA earned less than ZAR 3,000-3,500 pm in 2010 Source: Monitor/ Grail Analysis; SAT Domestic Surveys

  30. Segmenting the possible market • Using the action segmentation methodology, the available market is grouped into 14 distinct segments based on similarities in travel behaviour and preferences Seasoned Leisure Seekers Spontaneous Budget Explorers New Horizon Families High-Life Enthusiasts Older High Income Low Income Singles & Couples Low Income Black Singles Business Travellers Established Holiday Families Low Income Families Well-to-Do Mzansi Families Black Single-Parent Families Up and Coming Black Singles Older Middle Income Whites

  31. Understanding More about the Most Attractive SegmentsOverview of Prioritised Segments Spontaneous Budget Explorers New Horizon Families High-Life Enthusiasts Seasoned Leisure Seekers Well-to-Do Mzansi Families • 18-24 • All races • Income range: R5,001+ • 35+ • Black, Coloured and Indian • Income range: R5,001- R10,000 • 25-45 • Black, Coloured and Indian • Income range: R10,001+ • 25-45 • White • Income range: R5,001+ • 18-45 • Black, Coloured and Indian • Income range: R10,001+ • Avg. Length of Stay: 5.4 nights • Trips/year: 3 • Avg. Spend: R1,252.00 • Avg. Length of Stay: 5.2 nights • Trips/year: 3.1 • Avg. Spend: R1,160.50 • Avg. Length of Stay: 4.5 nights • Trips/year: 3.1 • Avg. Spend: R1,265.54 • Avg. Length of Stay: 7.7 nights • Trips/year: 4.4 • Avg. Spend: R1,853.40 • Avg. Length of Stay: 5.6 nights • Trips/year: 3.2 • Avg. Spend: R1,687.80 • Travel is a way to discover new people, places and adventures. Consumers in this segment travel to get away from the monotony of daily life; to add to their life experiences and fond memories • Travel is a way to educate their children, and to provide them with the opportunity to broaden their perspectives. It is also seen as quality time for the family to spend together, and a reward for hard work • Travel is a way to boost one’s social status, and to experience the finer things in life in new and different settings • Travel is a way of life and something of a necessity. Having grown up going on regular holidays, this group of consumers understands the value of travel experiences and memories over commodities • Travel is all about escaping the city, and being able to spend time with friends and family in new and different locations. To a certain extent, travel is also about exposing the children to alternative ways of life and activities Source: Monitor/ Grail Analysis; Domestic Segmentation Quantitative Survey 2011

  32. Integrated Marketing Activation The umbrella strategy combines aspects from all segments to create awareness and positivity around tourism for all South Africans • Value Proposition • Products Spontaneous Budget Explorers • Have fun in new/ different surroundings, whether with existing friends or meeting new friends along the way • Lots of activities with friends without being prescriptive • Spend quality family time and broaden the family’s horizons, while being rewarded for hard work • Accessible and informative family holidays New Horizon Families High-Life Enthusiasts • Domestic travel is the quickest and easiest way to enjoy invaluable and enviable world-class experiences • Glamorous and comfortable holidays Seasoned Leisure Seekers • South Africa has so many different places and ways to escape, relax and spend quality time with loved ones • Explore hidden cultural, culinary and landscape gems Well-to-Do Mzansi Families • Break away from daily pressures, whether relaxing with family or having good times with friends • Hassle free and comfortable getaways • Umbrella Strategy • Travelling in South Africa is not only a great way to explore the country and discover the many reasons why the rest of the world wants to visit, but also an accessible way to escape and have fun with family and friends Source: Monitor/ Grail Analysis

  33. High-level Implementation PlanRoles and Responsibilities • These roles and responsibilities extend to the more specific activities required, with us, SAT taking the lead on activating the market through both national-level demand-building... Activity NDT SAT Provincial and Local Authorities Industry • Activating the Market: Demand Building • Develop and execute a national educational campaign in collaboration with the Department of Education to build awareness around tourism and its value to South Africa • Provide direction to advertising agency in development of the national marketing communication campaign • Oversee all elements of the campaign, including integrated media strategy • Work to disseminate the planned key message to industry and channel partners to enable understanding and alignment • Develop toolkit to guide provincial and local players in their communication to ensure alignment with national messaging objectives • Develop provincial strategy and messaging relevant to brand building at a more general level • Fund, and oversee, development of provincial marketing communication campaigns in line with Toolkit developed by SAT • Continue to prioritise consumer segments for activation according to business objectives • Understand national strategy and identify areas in which it aligns with business strategy Source: Monitor/ Grail Analysis

  34. High-level Implementation PlanRoles and Responsibilities • And overseeing all elements of fulfilment through both SAT-led activity, and the provision of guidelines to assist collaborators in industry and government Activity NDT SAT Provincial and Local Authorities Industry • Oversee development and dissemination of information through physical and online channels • Provide insight into segment information needs and product needs to relevant industry and channel partners • Collaborate to develop and disseminate information and packages Investigate alternative physical channels and develop JMAs where possible to further the accessibility of products • Identify and provide training to channel partners to enable capability building • Collaborate with SAT and provincial authorities to provide product-specific information to be delivered to prioritised consumers through relevant information gathering channels • Collaborate with SAT and provincial authorities to develop product packages relevant to prioritised consumer segments • Make space available for information dissemination • E.g., Pamphlet distribution at front desks of car hire companies, hotel reception, travel agency windows, airline magazines • Activating the Market: Fulfilment • Ensure that resources are allocated to both SAT and provincial and local authorities to enable them to activate the market effectively • Establish common platforms where stakeholders can discuss issues around collaboration • Using toolkit and guidelines provided by SAT, prioritise segments that are well-suited to activation by the province and/ or cities • Oversee development and dissemination of information brochures relevant to provincial strategy • Provide direction for provincial information needs to relevant industry and channel partners • Collaborate with industry and channel partners to develop packages that are aligned with provincial strategy Source: Monitor/ Grail Analysis

  35. High-level Implementation PlanRoles and Responsibilities • In terms of tracking the market and ensuring supply, it is important for us, SAT to leverage key relationships and co-ordinate the various stakeholders to ensure that these elements of the strategy are executed Activity NDT SAT Provincial and Local Authorities Industry • Tracking the Market • Liaise with other government data collection agencies (e.g., StatsSA) to ensure that SAT is getting the required information and data • Co-ordinate and help to connect SAT to other parties collecting information that may be useful for tracking of the market (e.g., GCIS) • Track the evolution of the domestic market, based on key indicators • Trigger in-depth analysis and updated segmentation of the market when necessitated by sustained changes to the market landscape • Evaluate the impact of activation activities on the travel behaviour of domestic consumers • Supplement research provided by SAT to enable tracking of the evolution of relevant consumer segments • Feed province-level data back to SAT • Adjust provincial and local strategy as necessary based on changes to the market and changes to the national strategy by SAT • Make internal research and insights available to SAT, in order to enable a feedback loop that provides views on the consumer from multiple angles and sources • Co-ordinate, and fund, the audit of available product • Work with other government bodies, industry and industry bodies to move development of product forward • Evaluate the response to products developed for specific segments • Work with the NDT to conduct an audit of products available • Map against segment needs to identify gaps • Work with SAT and NDT to find areas where national product development objectives align with the business objectives of the industry and can be filled through industry action and with industry funding • Ensuring Supply to the Market • Work together with SAT and NDT to identify product availability and gaps at provincial level Source: Monitor/ Grail Analysis

  36. Introduction Growth Maturity Domestic Campaign national campaign: travel like a tourist in your own country & be the envy of the world Travel is an accessible way for you to live a vicarious life, if only for a short while. The possibilities and opportunities that lie in wait for you while you’re exploring are infinite and immediate. insiders sa:see your world as the world sees it By encouraging people to escape to their ideal destination in their minds, the segment relevant deals that will be within our communication mix simply serve as the confirmation and hassle-free way to access the market’s ideals.

  37. Average Spend per Arrival Goal 2 Continued………….

  38. Strategic Outcome Oriented Goal 2: To market South Africa in such a way that the average spend per arrival in South Africa are at least R12 536 per person during the 2012 calendar year being in South Africa Goal Statement 2 Through the execution of its Strategic Plan and Annual Performance Plan, the following spend per person should be achieved on average for every person arriving in South Africa: • 2010/11 actual R8,900 per person (this excludes prepaid) • 2011/12 calendar year target: R11 960 per person (this includes prepaid) • 2012/13 calendar year target: R12 536 per person (now calculated NITS i.e. includes prepaid) • 2013/14 calendar year target: R13 360 per person

  39. Spend per Country Through the execution of its Strategic Plan and Annual Performance Plan, the following spend per be person should achieved on average for every person arriving in South Africa:

  40. Strategic Outcome Orientated Goal Number 3

  41. Strategic Outcome Oriented Goal 3: To market South Africa in such a way that South Africa becomes a most preferred Tourism Brand by 2014 obtaining at least a 79% brand awareness To become one of the most preferred Tourism Brand by 2014 as measured by the following criteria: 1. Brand Knowledge 2. Brand Journey 3. Conversion of positive brand awareness to sales Increase Average Brand Awareness • Achieved 79% in Feb 2011 • Target 79% Feb 2012 to 2015

  42. Significantly below Average for 13 destinations (at 95% confidence level) Significantly below Average for 13 destinations (at 95% confidence level) Conversion – Global Target (2008-11) The closure ratio improved for both core markets and investment markets in 2011, as compared to 2010 Core Markets1 1 in 2.75 (2008) 1 in 2.85 (2009) 1 in 2.56 (2010) 1 in 2.10 (2011) Global Closure Ratio 1 in 2.75 (2008) 1 in 2.88 (2009) 1 in 2.65 (2010) 1 in 2.19 (2011) Investment Markets2 1 in 2.78 (2008) 1 in 3.12 (2009) 1 in 3.76 (2010) 1 in 3.26 (2011) Note: Global closure ratios weighted according to marketing spend in market; Closure Ratio = Visited in Past 18 Months / Sought Info in the Past; 1Core Markets’ score does not include Kenya and Nigeria for 2008 to 2010; 2Investment Markets’ score does not include the Brazil market for 2010 Source: SAT BrandTrackerFeb-08 through Nov-11 (merged for each year)

  43. SA Brand Journey – Global Target (2008-11) Compared to 2010, South Africa’s global scores on Positivity and Short-term Consideration have improved slightly in 2011 Global Targets Note: In 2011, Core Markets weighted according to relative investment spend – Australia = 7.3%, France = 13%, Germany = 15.2%, India = 7.8%, Netherlands = 9.5%, UK = 20.2% , USA = 21.4%, Kenya = 2.7%, Nigeria = 2.7%; Investment Markets weighted according to – China = 38.9%, Italy = 25.8%, Japan = 11.6% and Brazil = 23.7%; Global Average, weighted according to investment spend – Core = 90%, Investment = 10%; All rating questions have been analyzed using top 2 box approach Source: SAT BrandTracker Feb-08 through Nov-11 (merged for each year)

  44. Key Brand Journey Metrics (2011) Note: Core Markets weighted according to relative investment spend – Australia = 7.3%, France = 13%, Germany = 15.2%, India = 7.8%, Netherlands = 9.5%, UK = 20.2% , USA = 21.4%, Kenya = 2.7%, Nigeria = 2.7%; Investment Markets weighted according to – China = 38.9%, Italy = 25.8%, Japan = 11.6% and Brazil = 23.7%; All rating questions have been analyzed using top 2 box approach Source: SAT BrandTracker Feb-11 and Nov-11

  45. Knowledge of the Brand – SA Rank Versus All Destinations (2011) Between 2010 and 2011, South Africa’s rankings improved in seven markets, most notably in Netherlands, India and Nigeria, while in China, the rankings have declined slightly in 2011 Ranking (out of 10) of The SA Brand Relative to Competitors Along Key Brand Attributes – 2011 Significantly Above Average for 10 destinations (at 95% confidence level) Significantly Below Average for 10 destinations (at 95% confidence level) When SA is ranked lowest amongst competitors When SA is ranked highest amongst competitors Note: For ranking purposes, if there are more than 10 destinations in survey, the following destinations are removed from rankings: USA followed by Italy and France Source: SAT BrandTracker Feb-11 and Nov-11

  46. Strategic Outcome Orientated Goal Number 4

  47. Strategic Outcome Oriented Goal 4: To deliver on the quality experience expected by the international and domestic tourist by having at least graded 6 172 tourism products in South Africa by 31 March 2013 Quality experience by the international and domestic tourist

  48. Plaque has been re-designed with New Security Feature

  49. Accommodating visitors with disabilities • South Africa needs to know how friendly our tourism accommodation facilities are to people living with disabilities or impairments!

  50. Strategic Outcome Orientated Goal Number 5