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Bob PowerPoint Presentation

Bob

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Bob

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  1. Sentence: a group of words that tells a complete thought. Bob left.

  2. NOT sentences: • “Gone over there.” • “My face.” • “Yellow and green.” • “A BYU football player.” • “Left.” • “Ate it.” • These do NOT have a front wheel and back wheel. • Sometimes it is okay to talk this way in conversation. It is NOT okay to write this way!

  3. ALSO not sentences: • Connecticut. • Became a state in 1788. • Fifty states. • Make the United States.

  4. Connecticut—FRONT WHEEL • Became a state.—BACK WHEEL • Fifty states—FRONT WHEEL • Make the United States—BACK WHEEL

  5. Connecticut became a state in 1788. • Fifty states make the United States.

  6. SUBJECT… • The WHO. Connecticut became a state in 1788. Fifty states make the United States.

  7. PREDICATE… • The WHAT. Connecticut became a state in 1788. Fifty states make the United States.

  8. What is the subject? • My sister visited New Hampshire last summer.

  9. What is the subject? My sister visited New Hampshire last summer.

  10. What is the predicate? • The United States bought Alaska from Russia.

  11. What is the predicate? The United States bought Alaska from Russia.

  12. There are 4 kinds of sentences. -Declarative: makes a statement, like “I declare this day a holiday from school.” -Interrogative: a question—interrogates someone. “Where were you last night?” -Imperative: a command—imposes your demands on someone. “Turn around slowly and put your hands where I can see them.” -Exclamatory: has an exclamation point, shows excitement or strong feeling: “I didn’t do it!”

  13. 4 kinds of sentences again: -declarative -interrogative -imperative -exclamatory

  14. Declarative: • We were whistling “Dixie” while we worked. • I located the Appalachian Mountains on the map. • Cotton grows in the Black Belt of Alabama.

  15. Interrogative • Do you whistle while you work? • Can you locate the Appalachians on the map? • Where does cotton grow?

  16. Imperative • Whistle while you work. • Locate the Appalachian Mountains on the map. • Plant some cotton.

  17. Exclamatory • Yee-hah! • I found it! • Don’t that beat all!

  18. But what if Bob is really sad that we didn’t tell more about him so we want to make our sentence say, “Cute little Bob left for the hair salon.” • In that case, the sentence would have a SIMPLE SUBJECT and SIMPLE PREDICATE.

  19. Here, all we have is a WHO and a WHAT. These are the SIMPLE SUBJECT and SIMPLE PREDICATE. Bob left.

  20. Here, instead of keeping it SIMPLE, we made it COMPLICATED by adding bows to it. Cute little BOB LEFT for the hair salon.

  21. Red-headed John played the piano all night.

  22. The SIMPLE version: John played.

  23. And, complicated, here we go! Red-headed JOHN PLAYED the piano all night. What is the SIMPLE subject?

  24. The basketball player shoots baskets every day.

  25. The SIMPLE version: Player shoots.

  26. And, complicated, here we go! The basketball PLAYER SHOOTS baskets every day. What is the SIMPLE subject?

  27. Simple predicate, same idea: • Tom told me a joke.

  28. The SIMPLE version: Simple predicate is TOLD. Tom told.

  29. And, complicated, here we go! TOM TOLD me a joke. Simple predicate: Told.

  30. But sometimes… • We try to make a bike with only one wheel…and we end up talking like a caveman.

  31. The girl with the dog.

  32. Opened the book.

  33. Jumping over the fence.

  34. The doctor at the hospital.

  35. The student with the notebook.

  36. A bike with only one wheel… • We call it a FRAGMENT. • A sentence missing the subject or verb.

  37. A sentence can also be a fragment if it is missing punctuation marks, or using the wrong form of the verb (ing or to): • The girl walking her dog. • Jenny to make her bed.

  38. Fixing a FRAGMENT • To fix a fragment you have to add a subject or verb, and punctuation. • Hissed at me. • My kitten hissed at me. • The snake hissed at me.

  39. The suspension bridge. • The suspension bridge is wobbly. • OR… The suspension bridge collapsed. Practice time!!!!

  40. Action Verbs • The simple predicate, or the back wheel.

  41. The action verb tells you what the subject did or will do. • Marched • Proclaimed • Oppressed • Suffered • Study • Tell • Declare • overthrow

  42. Spicy Action Verbs

  43. We want INTERESTING verbs! • The parrot talked. BORING…..

  44. SPICY!!!!!!!! • The parrot screeched, squawked, howled, squealed, barked, rasped, squeaked.

  45. Recently we talked about…

  46. PROPER nouns • AKA SNOTTY nouns. • They are better than everyone else. • Because they are so high and mighty, they MUST be capitalized. • Names of people, places and things.

  47. COMMON nouns • These are just regular Joes. Nothing special. • They are not in love with themselves…so they don’t need you to capitalize them.

  48. Proper nouns: • Great Britain • Lake Michigan • Friday • Legacy Preparatory Academy • Homer Simpson • Pillsbury • Aunt Jemima’s Syrup • July • Halloween • Oreo • Hannah Montanah • Hannibal Lecter

  49. Common nouns • country • lake • day • month • girl • book • chocolate