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Personal Safety

Personal Safety

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Personal Safety

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  1. Personal Safety Activity 1 Activity 15 Activity 8 Activity 9 Activity 16 Activity 2 Activity 10 Activity 17 Activity 3 Activity 11 Activity 18 Activity 4 Activity 12 Activity 19 Activity 5 Activity 6 Activity 13 Activity 20 Activity 7 Activity 14

  2. Safety in the Home Most important Put barbed wire on top of the garden fence Fit window locks Prioritise the list of jobs concerned with safety in the home. Explain your decisions. Service gas boiler Activity 1 Join Neighbourhood Watch Install a spyhole in the front door Install carbon monoxide detectors Least important Back

  3. Click + Alt to Input Text Safety in the Home Email your gas supplier asking them to install a carbon monoxide detector. Think about what kind of questions you would want to ask before installation. Enquiries@northerngas.co.uk Customer Ref: 6571 2999 9078 Add text here Activity 2 Back

  4. Safety in the Home If you did suspect you had a gas leak, in what order would you do the follow: Gas Co. Smell gas? What should you do? Go to see a doctor immediately 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Get out immediately Report the leak Turn off the gas supply Warn your neighbours Activity 3 Call 0800 111 999 Click and drag the above to their correct place on the list right. Back

  5. Safety in the Home Which additional guidance goes with each instruction? Click and drag the statements below, to complete the guidance. Gas Co. Smell gas? What should you do? 1. Turn off the gas supply 2. Get out immediately 3. Warn your neighbours 4. Call 0800 111 999 5. Report the leak 6. Go to see a doctor immediately Activity 4 to the gas supplier. at the meter. leave the doors and windows open if possible for ventilation. if you think you've been exposed to carbon monoxide gas. don't turn any electrical switches on or off and don't smoke! the gas emergency helpline. Back

  6. Protecting Your Home What is the purpose of each of the following texts? Who is each text aimed at? Click the texts for the tasks. • Teaching your children simple rules will help protect them against fire. Tell them: • never play with matches or lighters • never play with a lighted candle • never play close to a fire or heater, or leave toys near a fire or heater • don’t pull on electric cables or fiddle with electrical appliances or sockets • never switch on the cooker Protecting your belongings If you've saved up or worked hard to be able to buy a computer or an MP3 player, make sure that no-one else can get their hands on it. By taking a few simple security steps, you can keep your belongings extra safe. Activity 5 A Government report published yesterday claims that incidents of burglary over the last twelve months have significantly decreased as a result of homeowners installing their own detection systems. Robert Lester, the Justice Minister, reacted to the findings, saying: “Obviously, we are very… • FTG Fire Security • Security Services & EquipmentTel: 01412 673129 14, Shepley Crescent, Kent DA9 1LO • Burglar & Fire Alarms • CTV Installation • Access Control • Service & Repairs • Electrical Installations • Part P Approved Back For more on text types www.ngfl-cymru.org.uk/vtc/ngfl/2007-08/english/irf2/

  7. Protecting your Home What words/phrases/features help you to identify the purpose and audience of each text? Target Purpose Activity 5 Back

  8. Protecting your Home What words/phrases/features help you to identify the purpose and audience of each text? Target Purpose Activity 5 Back

  9. Protecting your Home What words/phrases/features help you to identify the purpose and audience of each text? Target Purpose Activity 5 Back

  10. Protecting your Home What words/phrases/features help you to identify the purpose and audience of each text? Target Purpose Activity 5 Back

  11. Protecting your Home Read the following instructions for improving safety in the home. The imperatives have been removed. Select the most appropriate one for each instruction from the list below – each one can only be used once. _______ sure heaters are BSI approved, in good condition and surrounded by a protective barrier or screen. ________ unused electrical outlets, including power strips, with protective devices. ________ bookcases, TV stands, dressers and free-standing shelves to the wall with furniture guard brackets. ________ rough furniture corners with rubber or plastic corner guards. ________ safety cushions on the rough edges of the hearth. ________ matches and lighters out of your child's reach, preferably in a locked cabinet. ______ your child that these items are not toys. ________ cigarettes in water prior to disposal. Activity 6 Protect Teach Attach Cover Store Stop Give Cover Immerse Keep Use Make Back

  12. Protecting your Home Write four further safety instructions as imperative sentences using the four unused verbs remaining in the list. Place text here Place text here Place text here Activity 7 Place text here Click + Alt on the ‘”lace text here” to Input Text into the boxes or use the pen tool Back

  13. fire flood Protecting your Home In the future it is estimated that up to 48% of homes in some areas of the UK will be at risk from flooding. And the total number of house fires every year is around 60,000! So plan ahead … Activity 8 Click + Alt to Input Text into the post-it notes Fill the Venn diagram by showing the differences and similarities between evacuating for a flood and evacuating for a fire. Back

  14. Making an emergency plan for a flood Think about what you would do in an emergency. Discuss the plan with your family or housemates, so that everyone knows what to do. How would you keep your pets safe? What would you do to secure your home before you leave? Activity 9 What would you need to do before you leave? Do you need to move any valuable items upstairs? If you needed to leave your home, where would you go and how would you get there? Next

  15. Making an emergency plan for a fire Click + Alt to Input Text into the speech bubbles Discuss what points you would have to consider when making an emergency plan for a fire. Write these as questions as per the prompts for the flood plan. Activity 9 Write up in detail, your plan for evacuating should there be a fire in your home. Back

  16. Safety at Work What potential health and safety risks are there for each of these workers? Name: Diana Occupation: Mobile Hairdresser Employer: Self-employed Hours: 10 am – 4 pm Job Outline: drives to clients’ homes to cut, dye, colour, bleach, perm and blow dry hair. Pic 1 Activity 10 Next

  17. Safety at Work What potential health and safety risks are there for each of these workers? Name: Ravi Occupation: Nurse Employer: Bridgwater Hospital Hours: Variable 8-hour shifts, plus overtime Job Outline: patient care; administering medication; moving patients around; dealing with families; reacting to emergency situations. Pic 1 Activity 10 Next

  18. Safety at Work What potential health and safety risks are there for each of these workers? Name: Michael Occupation: Nightclub Doorman Employer: Bar Zync Hours: 9 pm – 4 am Job Outline: ensuring safety of customers; spotting potential trouble-makers; organising customer entry. Pic 1 Activity 10 Next

  19. Safety at Work What potential health and safety risks are there for each of these workers? Name: Serena Occupation: Software Programmer / IT Support Employer: Armitage Computer Solutions Hours: 9 am – 6 pm Job Outline: providing connections for colleagues; inputting data; working with office software. Pic 1 Activity 10 Back

  20. Safety at Work Select one of the workers and complete a risk assessment for an average working day for that person. HIGH MEDIUM LOW HIGH MEDIUM LOW HIGH MEDIUM LOW Activity 11 HIGH MEDIUM LOW HIGH MEDIUM LOW HIGH MEDIUM LOW HIGH MEDIUM LOW Back

  21. Bridgwater Hospital Clearwater Road, Bridgwater, BW1 9YG 21, Cherry Drive, Bridgwater, BW2 7ST 21 September 2010 Dear Mr Patel, As part of you responsibilities as senior ward nurse in Bridgwater Hospital’s paediatric ward, the senior management team would like you to undertake a review of the potential risks to patients and staff in your ward. The management team will expect a report by 31 March 2013 covering the aspects below: What are the potential risks? Who could be harmed and how? What you are already doing to minimise risks? What further action is necessary? How you will put these ideas into action? Please contact the Health and Safety team should you require further assistance. Yours sincerely, Nina Sullivan Hospital Manager Safety at Work Read the letter sent by Bridgwater Hospital to Ravi. Activity 12 Next

  22. What are the potential risks? Who could be harmed and how? What you are already doing to minimise risks? What further action is necessary? How you will put these ideas into action? Safety at Work What advice would you give Ravi to prepare for each section of his report? Click and drag to match the advice (left) with the question (right). • Walk around the workplace. • Ask other employees what they think. • Visit the website or call Health and Safety Executive Infoline. • Check manufacturers’ instructions for equipment used. Ensure that risks have been reduced ‘so far as is reasonably practicable’. An easy way of doing this is to compare what is being done already with good practice. If there is a difference, list what needs to be done. List what is already in place to reduce the likelihood of harm or make any harm less serious. Activity 12 Remember to prioritise. Deal with those hazards that are high-risk and have serious consequences first. • Identify workers who have particular needs. • People who may not be in the workplace all the time. • Hazards caused by members of the public. • How the general work could affect others present. • Explore how the hazard could cause harm. Back

  23. Safety at Work Which of these sections do you think it will be most difficult for Ravi to prepare for? Put them in order of difficulty. Explain your reasons. Most difficult What are the potential risks? Activity 13 Who could be harmed and how? What you are already doing to minimise risks? What further action is necessary? How you will put these ideas into action? Back

  24. Identify the features of a report Activity 14 Hint Back

  25. Identify the features of a leaflet Activity 15 Logo Rhetorical question Imperatives Alliteration Informal tone First person address Sub-heading Bullet points Contact details Slogan Bold/Underlining Emotive language Repetition Lists Images Back

  26. Identify the features of a leaflet Click once to magnify image, again to close. Back Activity 15

  27. Safety on the Streets 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Listen to the advice and make notes on how to stay safe on the street. Activity 16 Now produce a leaflet for street safety aimed at teenagers. Remember to use appropriate features. Back

  28. Road Safety Compare the two road safety websites (click on the graphics to view the sites). Who are the target audiences for each? How do you know? Activity 17 Next

  29. Road Safety Drink driving If you drive at twice the current legal alcohol limit, you are at least 30 times more likely to cause a road crash than a driver who has not been drinking. Read more about how THINK! is helping to reduce the number of road accidents caused by drink driving. Activity 17 Next

  30. Driver tiredness Driver sleepiness is estimate to account for around one fifth of accidents on major roads, and is responsible for around 300 deaths per year. Read this section to learn how THINK! has addressed this issue. Road Safety Activity 17 Next

  31. Driving for work Around 200 road deaths and serious injuries each week involve someone who is on the road as part of their work duties. Read more about how THINK! is helping to promote road safety among those who drive for work. Road Safety Activity 17 Next

  32. Drug driving For those caught while driving under the influence of drugs, the penalties are as severe as for those who drink and drive. Read more about how THINK! is helping to reduce the number of road accidents caused by drug driving. Road Safety Activity 17 Next

  33. Horse sense Find out how THINK! has teamed up with the British Horse Society to help advise drivers on how to avoid accidents when meeting with horses on the road. Road Safety Activity 17 Next

  34. Next Road Safety Activity 18

  35. Next Road Safety 1. First find a safe place to cross and where there is space to reach the pavement on the other side. Where there is a crossing nearby, use it. It is safer to cross using a subway, a footbridge, an island, a zebra, pelican, toucanor puffincrossing, or where there is a crossing point controlled by a police officer, a school crossing patrolor a traffic warden. Otherwise choose a place where you can see clearly in all directions. Try to avoid crossing between parked cars and on a blind bend or close to the brow of a hill. Move to a space where drivers and riders can see you clearly. Activity 18

  36. Next Road Safety 2. Stop just before you get to the kerb where you can see if anything is coming and where drivers can see you. Do not get too close to the traffic. If there is no pavement, keep back from the edge of the road but make sure you can still see approaching traffic. Activity 18

  37. Next Road Safety 3. Look all around for traffic and listen. Traffic could come from any direction. Listen as well, because you can sometimes hear traffic before you see it. Activity 18

  38. Next Road Safety 4. When it is safe, go straight across the road – do not run. If traffic is coming, let it pass. Look all around again and listen. Do not cross until there is a safe gap in the traffic and you are certain that there is plenty of time. Remember, even if traffic is a long way off, it may be approaching very quickly. Activity 18

  39. Back Road Safety 5. When it is safe go straight across the road – do not run! Keep looking and listening for traffic while you cross, in case there is any traffic you did not see, or in case other traffic appears suddenly. Look out for cyclists and motorcyclists travelling between lanes of traffic. Do not walk diagonally across the road. Activity 18

  40. Road Safety Activity 19 Complete the Venn diagram to show similarities and differences between the two texts. Think about: layout of the webpage; images; colour; language; purpose; audience. Back

  41. Road Safety What emotions does the advertisement aim to evoke? How does the advertisement use sound; images; facts; persuasive devices? Activity 20 Back